Cycle ball

Last updated

Cycle ball
UCI Cycle Ball 2on1.jpg
Cycle ball
Highest governing body Union Cycliste Internationale
First played1893
Characteristics
ContactNo
Team membersYes
Mixed gender No
TypeCycle sports
Presence
Country or regionEurope, Japan
Olympic No
World Games 1989
Cycle-ball, early 20th century Liebig bike polo.jpg
Cycle-ball, early 20th century

Cycle-ball, also known as "radball" (from German), is a sport similar to association football played on bicycles. The two people on each team ride a fixed gear bicycle with no brakes or freewheel. The ball is controlled by the bike and the head, except when defending the goal.

Contents

History

The sport was introduced in 1893 by a German-American, Nicholas Edward Kaufmann. Its first world championships were in 1929. Cycle-ball is popular in Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Japan, Russia and Switzerland. The most successful players were the Pospíšil brothers of Czechoslovakia, world champions 20 times between 1965 and 1988.

Closely related is artistic cycling in which the athletes perform a kind of gymnastics on cycles.

Championships

See also

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