Ritinis

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Ritinis competition in Vilnius, Lithuania. Ritinis.png
Ritinis competition in Vilnius, Lithuania.
Ritinis pictogram. Ritinis pictogram.svg
Ritinis pictogram.

Ritinis (also ritinys, rypka, rifle, katilka) is a team sport originating in Lithuania. It is included in the World Lithuanian Games. [1] Ritinis was also represented in the TAFISA World Games. [2]

Lithuania Republic in Northeastern Europe

Lithuania, officially the Republic of Lithuania, is a country in the Baltic region of Europe. Lithuania is considered to be one of the Baltic states. The country is situated along the southeastern shore of the Baltic Sea, to the east of Sweden and Denmark. It is bordered by Latvia to the north, Belarus to the east and south, Poland to the south, and Kaliningrad Oblast to the southwest. Lithuania has an estimated population of 2.8 million people as of 2019, and its capital and largest city is Vilnius. Other major cities are Kaunas and Klaipėda. Lithuanians are Baltic people. The official language, Lithuanian, is one of only two living languages in the Baltic branch of the Indo-European language family, the other being Latvian.

TAFISA voluntary association

The Association For International Sport for All (TAFISA) is the leading international Sport for All organisation. With more than 270 members from over 150 countries on all continents, TAFISA aims to achieve an Active World by globally promoting and facilitating access for every person to Sport for All and physical activity.

Contents

Gameplay

Ritinis is often played on a football field. Games last 40 minutes with a half-time interval after 20 minutes.

Two teams of seven players each (six strikers and one goal keeper) compete to throw the Rypka, a hard rubber discus, either behind their opponents' back line for 1 point, or in their opponents' goal for 3 points. Players can only throw the discus with their hands, while they can only block the discus with their bats, which are curved and are called Ritmuša.

It is common for teams to have five reserve players on hand.

Equipment

Scoring

History

Ritinis originated from the Lithuanian ethnic game that was played on an open field. The first rule book of stadium ritinis game was written by Karolis Dineika in Vilniaus rypka (the rypka of Vilnius) in 1923. [3]

In 1958 the Lithuanian Ethnic Games Federation was created and included ritinis. In 1973 a separate Lithuanian Ritinis Federation was established. The first Lithuanian National Championships were held in 1961.

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References