Hungarian sausages

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Hungarian Gyulai Kolbasz Gyulai kolbasz.jpg
Hungarian Gyulai Kolbász

Hungarian sausages are sausages found in the cuisine of Hungary. Hungary produces a vast number of sausage types. They may be boiled, fresh or dried, and smoked, with different spices and flavors, "hot" or "mild". Many were influenced by their neighbor and brethren.

Contents

These sausages may be eaten like a cold cut or used in a main course. Hungarian cuisine uses these different types of sausages in many ways such as in stews, soups, potato stews like "paprikás krumpli" (paprika-based stew with spicy sausage and potatoes), bean soups like Jókai bableves, [1] some goulash soup variations, pastry dishes, or even in salads.

The smoked sausages may contain bacon, ground pork, beef, boar or lamb, paprika, salt, garlic, black pepper, allspice, white pepper, caraway, nutmeg, zest, marjoram, cayenne pepper, sugar, white wine or cognac. Beef or lamb is usual in halal and kosher Hungarian sausages, which never include pork or boar for religious reasons.

The meat is coarsely ground and salted. If garlic is added, it is mashed in water to produce a slurry and added to the meat along with spices. The sausage is then stuffed into natural casings in 1-foot links - usually using the small intestine of the pig. This traditionally took place outside on the fall day when a pig was slaughtered. The sausage is then hung overnight to allow the flavors to meld and some of the grease to drip out. It is now ready to be used fresh and unsmoked. Fresh sausages may have additional ingredients like liver, mushroom, bread, rice, lemon juice, eggs, cream or milk. The unsmoked sausages are typically roasted with sauerkraut or red or green cabbage, and served with mashed potatoes.

The dry sausages are cold smoked and hung to cure before use.

Sausages

Kolbász

Csabai kolbasz Csabai kolbasz.jpg
Csabai kolbász

Kolbász is a traditional Hungarian smoked sausage seasoned with paprika. The best known and most popular versions are:

Hurka

Hurka are boiled sausages that come in two main types "májas" (liver sausage), and "véres" (blood sausage). The main ingredient is liver and rice, or blood and rice. Spices, pepper and salt are added.

Other cooked sausages

Szalámi

Hungary's most famous salami is téliszalámi (Winter salami).

See also

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References

  1. Gundel, Karoly (1992). Gundel's Hungarian cookbook. Budapest: Corvina. ISBN   963-13-3600-X. OCLC   32227400.page 24
  2. Gyulai kolbász / Gyulai pároskolbász, European Commission
  3. "Gyulai Kolbász (sausage)". Hungarian Horticulture. Archived from the original on 2008-06-07. Retrieved 2008-09-08.
  4. Csabai kolbász/Csabai vastagkolbász, European Commission
  5. Gundel, Karoly (1992). Gundel's Hungarian cookbook. Budapest: Corvina. ISBN   963-13-3600-X. OCLC   32227400.page 100