Jim Redman

Last updated

Jim Redman
06-08-05-RupHollGedenk-Jim REDMAN-108.jpg
Redman in 2006
NationalityZimbabwean
Born (1931-11-08) 8 November 1931 (age 91)
London, England
Motorcycle racing career statistics
Grand Prix motorcycle racing
Active years 19591966
First race 1959 350cc West German Grand Prix
Last race 1966 250cc Belgian Grand Prix
First win 1961 250cc Belgian Grand Prix
Last win 1966 500cc Dutch TT
Team(s) Honda
Championships 250cc – 1962, 1963
350cc – 19621965
StartsWinsPodiums Poles F. laps Points
1354598N/A35546

James Albert Redman, MBE (born 8 November 1931) is a British-born Zimbabwean former professional motorcycle racer. He competed in Grand Prix motorcycle racing from 1959 to 1966. Redman is notable for being a six-time Grand Prix road racing world champion. [1] In 2012, Redman was named an FIM Legend for his motorcycling achievements. [2]

Contents

History

Redman c. 1966 Jim Redman 1966.jpg
Redman c. 1966

Born in London, England, he emigrated to Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 1952, where he began his racing career. He met with John Love who was changing from motorcycle racing to single-seat cars. Redman enthusiastically helped Love prepare and maintain his Cooper F3 with a Manx Norton 500 cc engine. In recognition for Redman's assistance, Love allowed Redman to ride his Triumph Grand Prix including use of his riding gear for his first racing experiences. [3]

Redman acquired more experience on his home tracks, culminating in winning the 350 cc Rhodesian Championship, after which he aspired to European racing, starting at Brands Hatch in the company of Geoff Duke and a young, rising Mike Hailwood. After changing his riding style to better-suit the European circuits, Redman achieved some success, but retired from motorcycle racing and returned to Rhodesia in 1959. Still wanting to race, Redman returned to Europe where he hoped to secure a contract riding for Walter Kaaden's MZ team in 125 cc and 250 cc classes. [3] He unexpectedly gained factory rides in selected races with Honda for part of the 1960 season due to an injury suffered by regular rider Tom Phillis, and became himself contracted for the 1961 season. [3]

Redman would go on to claim four consecutive 350cc World Championships from 1962 to 1965. In 1962 and 1963 he claimed double championships winning both the 250cc and 350cc World Championships. After being injured at the 1966 Belgian Grand Prix, Redman made the decision to retire. [4]

Redman was also a six-time Isle of Man TT winner, taking double wins in 1963, 1964 and 1965 in the Lightweight & Junior TT Races. [5] He achieved a total of 45 Grand Prix victories. Redman was awarded the MBE for his achievements.

Personal life

In 1966, Jim Redman published a book about his racing career, Wheels of Fortune. In 2013, he published his book, Jim Redman: Six Times World Motorcycle Champion – The Autobiography.

Grand Prix motorcycle racing results

Position123456
Points864321

(key) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearClassTeam12345678910111213PointsRankWins
1959 350cc Norton FRA
-
IOM
-
GER
6
NED
-
BEL
-
SWE
6
ULS
-
NAT
-
215th0
500cc Norton FRA
-
IOM
-
GER
-
NED
5
BEL
-
SWE
-
ULS
-
NAT
-
215th0
1960 125cc Honda IOM
-
NED
4
BEL
9
ULS
-
NAT
4
67th0
250cc Honda IOM
-
NED
8
BEL
-
GER
NC
ULS
3
NAT
2
104th0
500cc Norton FRA
-
IOM
-
NED
-
BEL
5
GER
-
ULS
5
NAT
6
59th0
1961 125cc Honda ESP
3
GER
7
FRA
3
IOM
4
NED
2
BEL
3
DDR
6
ULS
4
NAT
5
SWE
3
ARG
2
284th0
250cc Honda ESP
4
GER
2
FRA
6
IOM
3
NED
3
BEL
1
DDR
2
ULS
3
NAT
1
SWE
4
ARG
3
363rd2
1962 125cc Honda ESP
2
FRA
2
IOM
5
NED
2
BEL
2
GER
10
ULS
3
DDR
2
NAT
4
FIN
1
ARG
-
382nd1
250cc Honda ESP
1
FRA
1
IOM
2
NED
1
BEL
2
GER
1
ULS
2
DDR
1
NAT
1
ARG
-
48 1st 6
350cc Honda IOM
-
NED
1
ULS
1
DDR
1
NAT
1
FIN
2
32 1st 4
1963 125cc Honda ESP
2
GER
NC
FRA
2
IOM
6
NED
NC
BEL
2
ULS
7
DDR
5
NAT
2
FIN
-
ARG
1
JPN
2
333rd1
250cc Honda ESP
2
GER
3
IOM
1
NED
1
BEL
-
ULS
1
DDR
3
NAT
2
ARG
2
JPN
1
44 1st 4
350cc Honda GER
1
IOM
1
NED
1
ULS
1
DDR
3
NAT
1
FIN
2
JPN
1†
32 1st 5
1964 125cc Honda USA
-
ESP
2
FRA
NC
IOM
2
NED
1
GER
1
DDR
3
ULS
NC
FIN
3
NAT
6
JPN
-
362nd2
250cc Honda USA
-
ESP
2
FRA
NC
IOM
1
NED
1
BEL
2
GER
2
DDR
2
ULS
2
NAT
3
JPN
1
422nd3
350cc Honda IOM
1
NED
1
GER
1
DDR
1
ULS
1
FIN
1
NAT
1
JPN
1
40 1st 8
1965 125cc Honda USA
-
GER
-
ESP
-
FRA
-
IOM
-
NED
-
DDR
-
CZE
-
ULS
-
FIN
-
NAT
-
JPN
NC
00
250cc Honda USA
-
GER
-
ESP
-
FRA
NC
IOM
1
NED
2
BEL
1
DDR
1
CZE
3
ULS
-
FIN
-
NAT
-
JPN
-
343rd3
350cc Honda GER
NC
IOM
1
NED
1
DDR
1
CZE
1
ULS
NC
FIN
-
NAT
-
JPN
2
38 1st 4
1966 250cc Honda ESP
NC
GER
2
FRA
2
NED
3
BEL
3
DDR
-
CZE
-
FIN
-
ULS
-
IOM
-
NAT
-
JPN
-
203rd0
350cc Honda GER
-
FRA
3
NED
-
DDR
-
CZE
-
FIN
-
ULS
-
IOM
-
NAT
-
JPN
-
415th0
500cc Honda GER
1
NED
1
BEL
NC
DDR
-
CZE
-
FIN
-
ULS
-
IOM
-
NAT
-
165th2

† The 1963 350cc Japanese Grand Prix was a non-championship event.

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References

  1. Jim Redman career statistics. MotoGP.com
  2. "FIM Legends" (PDF). fim-live.com. Retrieved 29 April 2020.
  3. 1 2 3 Carrick, Peter Motor Cycle Racing Hamlyn Publishing, 1969, p. 72 ISBN   0 600 02506 3
  4. 50 Years of Moto Grand Prix (1st edition). Hazelton Publishing Ltd, 1999. ISBN   1-874557-83-7
  5. Jim Redman. iomtt.com