Kumbak

Last updated
Kumbak
TypePrivate
Industry Amusement rides, roller coasters
FoundedNovember 14, 2001 (2001-11-14)
Founder9 former Vekoma employees
Headquarters,
Area served
Worldwide
Number of employees
16 (as of 3 December 2001)
Website www.kumbakcoasters.com

Kumbak is a Dutch amusement ride manufacturing company. In addition to manufacturing its own rides, the company primarily specialises in changing existing rides and attractions, originally made by other manufacturers.

Contents

History

Kumbak (originally Kumbak Coasters) was formed on 14 November 2001 just months after the bankruptcy of Vekoma, a roller coaster manufacturer. [2] The company was founded by nine former employees of Vekoma. [2] The company expanded to a total of 16 employees less than a month later. [2] Kumbak's first project was to design a passenger evacuation platform for Morey's Piers' Great Nor' Easter Suspended Looping Coaster. [3] Since then the company has performed a complete upgrade on several rides originally made by different manufacturers, [4] as well as designing their own water coaster and dark rides. [5] [6] [7] [8]

Projects

A Kumbak car from the Sea Viper on display at the 2009 IAAPA Expo. Sea Viper train at IAAPA 2009.jpg
A Kumbak car from the Sea Viper on display at the 2009 IAAPA Expo.

List of roller coasters


As of 2019, Kumbak has built 1 roller coaster around the world. [29]

NameModelParkCountryOpenedStatusRef
De Vliegende Hollander Water Coaster Efteling Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands2007Operating [30]

See also

Related Research Articles

Vekoma Dutch amusement ride manufacturer

Vekoma Rides Manufacturing is a Dutch amusement ride manufacturer. Vekoma is portmanteau of Veld Koning Machinefabriek which was established in 1926 by Hendrik op het Veld.

Roller coaster inversion Section of inverted track on a roller coaster

A roller coaster inversion is a roller coaster element in which the track turns riders upside-down and then returns them to an upright position. Early forms of inversions, dating as far back as 1848 on the Centrifugal Railway in Paris, were vertical loops that were circular in nature. They produced massive g-force that was often dangerous to riders, and as a result, the element eventually became non-existent with the last rides to feature the looping inversions being dismantled during the Great Depression. In 1975, designers from Arrow Development created the corkscrew, reviving interest in the inversion during the modern age of steel roller coasters. Since then, the elements have evolved from simple corkscrews and vertical loops to more complex inversions such as Immelmann loops and cobra rolls. Featuring fourteen inversions, The Smiler at Alton Towers holds the world record for the number of inversions on a roller coaster.

Flying roller coaster Type of roller coaster

A flying roller coaster is a type of roller coaster meant to simulate the sensations of flight by harnessing riders in a prone position during the duration of the ride. The roller coaster cars are suspended below the track, with riders secured such that their backs are parallel to the track.

Bolliger & Mabillard, officially Bolliger & Mabillard Consulting Engineers, Inc. and often abbreviated B&M, is a roller coaster design consultancy based in Monthey, Switzerland. The company was founded in 1988 by Walter Bolliger and Claude Mabillard, both of whom had worked for Giovanola.

The Riddlers Revenge Roller coaster at Six Flags Magic Mountain

The Riddler's Revenge is a stand-up roller coaster located at Six Flags Magic Mountain. Manufactured by Bolliger & Mabillard, the ride opened as the park's eleventh roller coaster on April 4, 1998, setting multiple world records among stand-up coasters. Originally located in the Movie District section of the park, which later became Metropolis in 2017, The Riddler's Revenge was also the park's single biggest investment at a cost of $14 million. It features a height of 156 feet (48 m), a maximum speed of 65 mph (105 km/h), six inversions, and a track length of 4,370 feet (1,330 m).

Kumba (roller coaster) Ride at Busch Gardens Tampa

Kumba is a steel roller coaster located at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay in Tampa, Florida. Manufactured by Bolliger & Mabillard, the ride opened in 1993. It stands 143 feet (44 m) tall and has a top speed of 60 miles per hour (97 km/h). Kumba features a total of seven inversions across the 3-minute ride.

Giant Inverted Boomerang Steel roller coaster

A Giant Inverted Boomerang is a type of steel shuttle roller coaster manufactured by the Dutch firm Vekoma. The ride is a larger, inverted version of Vekoma's popular Boomerang sit down roller coasters. As of January 2022, four installations of the model are operating, with another one under construction.

Suspended Looping Coaster Type of roller coaster

The Suspended Looping Coaster is a model of steel inverted roller coaster built by Vekoma. There are at least 39 different installations across the world. The minimum rider height requirement is 130 centimetres. Vekoma is now marketing a Suspended Thrill Coaster as a successor to the Suspended Looping Coaster. The Odyssey is the largest, fastest and tallest SLC ever built at Fantasy Island in the UK.

Arkham Asylum – Shock Therapy

Arkham Asylum – Shock Therapy is a Vekoma SLC roller coaster located at Warner Bros. Movie World on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. When the ride was introduced in 1995, it was themed to the Lethal Weapon film series created by Shane Black and was named Lethal Weapon – The Ride. In 2012, the ride was rethemed to Batman: Arkham Asylum and renamed Arkham Asylum. The ride was the first steel inverted roller coaster at an Australian theme park.

T3 (roller coaster) Roller coaster at Kentucky Kingdom

T3 (stylized as T3; pronounced "T-three", "T-cubed", or "Terror to the third power") is an inverted roller coaster at Kentucky Kingdom in Louisville, Kentucky. Previously named T2, the Suspended Looping Coaster model manufactured by Vekoma opened on April 8, 1995. The amusement park closed in 2009 due to financial difficulties, but later reopened under new ownership in 2014. The roller coaster was refurbished and renamed T3, which reopened to the public on July 3, 2015.

Chance Rides

Chance Rides Manufacturing is a roller coaster and amusement ride manufacturer. The company was formed on May 16, 2002, when the former Chance Industries Inc. emerged from bankruptcy. The main office and manufacturing facility are located in Wichita, Kansas.

Dive Coaster Roller coaster model

The Dive Coaster is a steel roller coaster model developed and engineered by Bolliger & Mabillard. The design features one or more near-vertical drops that are approximately 90 degrees, which provide a moment of free-falling for passengers. The experience is enhanced by unique trains that seat up to ten riders per row, spanning only two or three rows total. Unlike traditional train design, this distinguishing aspect gives all passengers virtually the same experience throughout the course of the ride. Another defining characteristic of Dive Coasters is the holding brake at the top of the lift hill that holds the train momentarily right as it enters the first drop, suspending some passengers with a view looking straight down and releasing suddenly moments later.

Suspended Family Coaster

A Suspended Family Coaster is a steel inverted roller coaster built by Vekoma designed for families with no inversions. Just like all inverted roller coasters the train runs under the track with the seats directly attached to the wheel carriage. This latter attribute is what sets it apart from the older suspended swinging coaster, which runs under the track, but "swings" via a pivoting bar attached to the wheel carriage.

Python (Efteling)

Python is a double-loop corkscrew roller coaster in the Efteling amusement park in the Netherlands. It opened as the largest steel roller coaster on the European mainland.

Thunderbolt (Dreamworld)

The Thunderbolt was a steel roller coaster located at the Dreamworld theme park in Gold Coast, Australia. The roller coaster opened with the park in April 1982 and operated until 8 August 2003. It was demolished the following year.

Sea Viper (roller coaster)

The Sea Viper was a steel roller coaster at Sea World on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Shambhala (roller coaster) Steel hyper coaster

Shambhala: Expedición al Himalaya is a steel hypercoaster roller coaster located at PortAventura Park in Salou and Vilaseca, Spain. Manufactured by Bolliger & Mabillard, it was the tallest and fastest hypercoaster in Europe until Hyperion opened at Energylandia in Poland on 14 July 2018. The height record was beaten in April 2017 by Red Force, which was also opened in PortAventura World's new theme park Ferrari Land, this coaster reaches a height of 112 metres (367 ft). Shambhala is named and themed after the inaccessible land in the Himalayas: Shambhala. It was announced to the public on 24 October 2011, and opened to the public on 12 May 2012.

Rocky Mountain Construction Roller coaster manufacturer.

Rocky Mountain Construction, often abbreviated as RMC, is a manufacturing and construction company based in Hayden, Idaho, United States. The company is best known for its I-Box track and Topper Track for wooden roller coasters.

Sea Serpent (Moreys Piers)

Sea Serpent is a steel roller coaster at Morey's Piers in Wildwood, New Jersey. Opened in 1984, it was built by Vekoma, and was the first boomerang-style coaster to be built in the US. The coaster's installation was part of a redevelopment of the Marine Pier into a new Mariner's Landing area in 1984. The Sea Serpent currently sits in the middle of Mariners Landing and serves as an icon for the pier along with The Giant Wheel.

Water coaster (roller coaster)

A Water Coaster is a steel roller coaster that combines roller coaster elements, such as chain lift hills and steep drops, with boat-based attraction elements, such as splash-down landings.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "KumbaK makes comeback!". Park World Online. 1 November 2009. Archived from the original on 29 March 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  2. 1 2 3 Emmons, Natasha (3 December 2001). "Nine Former Vekoma Employees Come Back With Kumbak Coasters". All Business. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  3. 1 2 "Morey's Pier (US) – Great Nor'Easter Evacuation Platform (2003)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  4. "Complete Upgrade of Existing Rides". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  5. 1 2 "Hold the excitement!". Park World Online. 1 November 2006. Archived from the original on 5 January 2011. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  6. 1 2 "Vliegende Hollander". Park World Online. 22 August 2007. Archived from the original on 29 March 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 "KumbaK upgrades Port Aventura coasters". Park World Online. 1 January 2007. Archived from the original on 13 October 2008. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  8. 1 2 "Explore 5D partners with Kumbak". Park World Online. 1 January 2007. Archived from the original on 28 August 2008. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  9. "Pleasure Beach Blackpool (UK) – Space Invader 2 (2004)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  10. "Nederlands Spoorwegmuseum (NL) – Wereld 3 'Stalen Monsters' (2005)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  11. Marden, Duane. "Python  (Efteling)". Roller Coaster DataBase . Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  12. "Efteling (NL) – Python (2005)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  13. "Pleasure Beach Blackpool (UK) – Grand National (2006)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  14. "Kennywood (US) – Phantom's Revenge (2006)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  15. Marden, Duane. "Vliegende Hollander  (Efteling)". Roller Coaster DataBase . Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  16. "PortAventura (ES) – Stampida (2007)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  17. "PortAventura (ES) – Tomahawk (2007)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  18. "Ouwehands Dierenpark (NL) – Monkey Rail (2008)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  19. 1 2 "KumbaK changes direction". Park World Online. 18 December 2007. Archived from the original on 5 January 2011. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  20. "Explore 5D / 5D Network (AT) – Miraculum (2008)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  21. "Explore 5D / 5D Network (AT) – Vienna Airlines (2008)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  22. "Wonderland Park (US) – Hornet (2009)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  23. "Sea World (AU) – Sea Viper (2009)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  24. "Walibi World (NL) – Robin Hood Restraint (2010)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  25. "Bakken (DK) – Rutschebanen (2010)". Kumbak. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  26. Wilson, Richard (30 September 2011). "Movie World, September 30, 2011". The Parkz Update. Parkz. Retrieved 15 October 2011.
  27. Roldan, Roberto (July 3, 2015). "Gut-wrenching Kentucky Kingdom coaster opens". IndyStar. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  28. Novelly, Thomas (June 5, 2018). "Kentucky Kingdom roller coaster reopens after crash investigation". Courier Journal. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  29. Kumbak - rcdb.com
  30. Marden, Duane. "De Vliegende Hollander  (Efteling)". Roller Coaster DataBase . Retrieved 28 October 2013.