2019 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

Last updated
2019 North Indian Ocean cyclone season
2019 North Indian Ocean cyclone season summary.png
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedJanuary 4, 2019
(record earliest, tied with 2014)
Last system dissipatedSeason ongoing
Strongest storm
Name Fani
  Maximum winds215 km/h (130 mph)
(3-minute sustained)
  Lowest pressure937 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Depressions2
Deep depressions2
Cyclonic storms2
Severe cyclonic storms1
Very severe cyclonic storms1
Super cyclonic storms0
Total fatalities89 total
Total damage> $1.812 billion (2019 USD)
Related articles
North Indian Ocean tropical cyclone seasons
2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 , 2021

The 2019 North Indian Ocean cyclone season is an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The North Indian Ocean cyclone season has no official bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with the two peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. The season's first named storm, Pabuk, entered the basin on January 4, becoming the earliest-forming cyclonic storm of the North Indian Ocean on record. The second cyclone of the season, Fani, was the strongest tropical cyclone in the Bay of Bengal by 3-minute maximum sustained wind speed and minimum barometric pressure since the 1999 Odisha cyclone (while being equal in maximum 3-minute sustained wind speed to Phailin of the 2013 season).

Tropical cyclone Is a rotating storm system

A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane, typhoon, tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, and simply cyclone. A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, and a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean; in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean, comparable storms are referred to simply as "tropical cyclones" or "severe cyclonic storms".

Indian Ocean The ocean between Africa, Asia, Australia and Antarctica (or the Southern Ocean)

The Indian Ocean is the third largest of the world's oceanic divisions, covering 70,560,000 km2 (27,240,000 sq mi). It is bounded by Asia on the north, on the west by Africa, on the east by Australia, and on the south by the Southern Ocean or, depending on definition, by Antarctica.

Bay of Bengal Northeastern part of the Indian Ocean between India and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands

The Bay of Bengal is the northeastern part of the Indian Ocean, bounded on the west and northwest by India, on the north by Bangladesh, and on the east by Myanmar and the Andaman Islands of India and Myanmar and the Nicobar Islands of India. Its southern limit is a line between Sri Lanka and the northwesternmost point of Sumatra (Indonesia). It is the largest water region called a bay in the world. There are countries dependent on the Bay of Bengal in South Asia and Southeast Asia. The Bay of Bengal was also called the Chola Lake.

Contents

The scope of this article is limited to the Indian Ocean in the Northern Hemisphere, east of the Horn of Africa and west of the Malay Peninsula. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean — the Arabian Sea to the west of the Indian subcontinent, abbreviated ARB by the India Meteorological Department (IMD); and the Bay of Bengal to the east, abbreviated BOB by the IMD.

Northern Hemisphere half of Earth that is north of the equator

The Northern Hemisphere is the half of Earth that is north of the Equator. For other planets in the Solar System, north is defined as being in the same celestial hemisphere relative to the invariable plane of the solar system as Earth's North Pole.

Horn of Africa peninsula in Northeast Africa

The Horn of Africa is a peninsula in Northeast Africa. It extends hundreds of kilometers into the Arabian Sea and lies along the southern side of the Gulf of Aden. The area is the easternmost projection of the African continent. Referred to in ancient and medieval times as the land of the Barbara and Habesha, the Horn of Africa denotes the region containing the countries of Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Somalia.

Malay Peninsula peninsula in Southeast Asia

The Malay Peninsula is a peninsula in Southeast Asia. The land mass runs approximately north-south and, at its terminus, is the southernmost point of the Asian mainland. The area contains Peninsular Malaysia, Southern Thailand, and the southernmost tip of Myanmar (Kawthaung) as well as the city state Singapore, indigenous to or historically inhabited by the Malays, an Austronesian people.

The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and the National Meteorological Center of CMA (NMC) unofficially release full advisories. On average, three to four cyclonic storms form in this basin every season. [1] [2]

The India Meteorological Department (IMD) is an agency of the Ministry of Earth Sciences of the Government of India. It is the principal agency responsible for meteorological observations, weather forecasting and seismology. IMD is headquartered in Delhi and operates hundreds of observation stations across India and Antarctica.Regional offices are at Mumbai, Kolkata, Nagpur and Pune.

Joint Typhoon Warning Center

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) is a joint United States Navy – United States Air Force command located in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The JTWC is responsible for the issuing of tropical cyclone warnings in the North-West Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean, and Indian Ocean for all branches of the U.S. Department of Defense and other U.S. government agencies. Their warnings are intended for the protection of primarily military ships and aircraft as well as military installations jointly operated with other countries around the world.

National Meteorological Center of CMA is a subordinate body of the China Meteorological Administration in the People's Republic of China. It is a center for national weather forecasting, climate prediction, climate change study, meteorological information collection and dissemination. It is also designated by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) as the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) for Asia in case of accidental release and dispersion of radioactive substances. The NMC is finally also the regional meteorological data telecommunication hub for Asia.

Season summary

Cyclone FaniTropical Storm Pabuk (2019)2019 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

Systems

Cyclonic Storm Pabuk

Cyclonic storm (IMD)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Pabuk 2019-01-05 0410Z.jpg   Pabuk 2019 track.png
DurationJanuary 4 (Entered basin) – January 7
Peak intensity85 km/h (50 mph) (3-min)  998  hPa  (mbar)

Originally a tropical storm that formed over the South China Sea on January 1, Pabuk entered the Gulf of Thailand two days later. Shortly afterward, Pabuk made landfall over southern Thailand on January 4 and crossed into the Andaman Sea, and the IMD initiated advisories on the storm, making Pabuk the earliest-forming cyclonic storm for this basin, surpassing Hibaru in 2005, as well as the first cyclonic storm with a name originally assigned by RSMC Tokyo. [3] Over the few days of days, Pabuk continued moved west-northwestward, before weakening into a well-marked low on January 7. The system's remnant low then turned to the northeast, subsequently dissipating on January 8.

South China Sea A marginal sea of the Pacific Ocean from the Karimata and Malacca Straits to the Strait of Taiwan

The South China Sea is a marginal sea that is part of the Pacific Ocean, encompassing an area from the Karimata and Malacca Straits to the Strait of Taiwan of around 3,500,000 square kilometres (1,400,000 sq mi). The sea carries tremendous strategic importance; one-third of the world's shipping passes through it, carrying over $3 trillion in trade each year, it contains lucrative fisheries, which are crucial for the food security of millions in Southeast Asia. Huge oil and gas reserves are believed to lie beneath its seabed.

Gulf of Thailand A shallow inlet in the western part of the South China Sea

The Gulf of Thailand, also known as the Gulf of Siam, is a shallow inlet in the western part of the South China Sea, a marginal body of water in the western Pacific Ocean. The gulf is around 800 km (497 mi) long and up to 560 km (348 mi) wide, has a surface area of 320,000 km2 (123,553 sq mi) and is surrounded on the north, west and southwest by Thailand, on the northeast by Cambodia and Vietnam. The South China Sea is to the southeast.

Southern Thailand Region in Hat Yai

Southern Thailand is a southernmost cultural region of Thailand, separated from Central Thailand region by the Kra Isthmus.

Extremely Severe Cyclonic Storm Fani

Extremely severe cyclonic storm (IMD)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Fani 2019-05-02 1657Z.jpg   Fani 2019 track.png
DurationApril 26 – May 4
Peak intensity215 km/h (130 mph) (3-min)  937  hPa  (mbar)

On April 26, a depression formed to the west of Sumatra, with the IMD giving the storm the identifier BOB 02. The system slowly organized while curving towards the northeast. On April 27, at 00:00 UTC, the IMD upgraded the system to a deep depression. [4] Later that day, the system intensified into Cyclonic Storm Fani, while shifting to the northwest. Development of the system proceeded very slowly for several days, with the cyclone struggling to intensify against the influence of moderate vertical wind shear. [5] At 12:00 UTC on 29 April, Fani was upgraded to a severe cyclonic storm, with the system beginning to undergo rapid intensification. [6] [7] Fani continued rapidly intensifying, becoming an extremely severe cyclonic storm at 17:00 UTC on April 30. [8] The Joint Typhoon Warning Center upgraded the system to a Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson scale at 06:00 UTC on May 2, following which, rapid intensification resumed. Three-minute sustained winds increased to 215 km/h (130 mph), and one-minute sustained winds to 250 km/h (155 mph), making the system the equivalent of a high-end Category 4 major hurricane. On May 3, at 04:00 UTC (9:30 a.m. IST) Fani made landfall on Puri, in Odisha, [9] weakening to a Category 1-equivalent very severe cyclonic storm soon after landfall, subsequently weakening to a cyclonic storm several hours later. [10] On 4 May, Fani weakened into a deep depression and moved into Bangladesh. [11] Later that day, Fani degenerated into a well-marked low, [12] before dissipating on the next day.

Sumatra island in western Indonesia, westernmost of the Sunda Islands

Sumatra is a large island in western Indonesia that is part of the Sunda Islands. It is the largest island that is located entirely in Indonesia and the sixth-largest island in the world at 473,481 km2.

Rapid intensification

Rapid intensification is a meteorological condition that occurs when a tropical cyclone intensifies dramatically in a short period of time. The United States National Hurricane Center (NHC) defines rapid intensification as an increase in the maximum 1-min sustained winds of a tropical cyclone of at least 30 knots in a 24-hour period.

Indian Standard Time time zone, observed in India and Sri Lanka; UTC+05:30

Indian Standard Time (IST) is the time observed throughout India, with a time offset of UTC+05:30. India does not observe daylight saving time (DST) or other seasonal adjustments. In military and aviation time IST is designated E* ("Echo-Star").

Storm names

Within this basin, a tropical cyclone is assigned a name when it is judged to have reached Cyclonic Storm intensity with winds of 65 km/h (40 mph). The names were selected by members of the ESCAP/WMO Panel on Tropical Cyclones between 2000 and May 2004, before the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in New Delhi started to assign names in September 2004. There is no retirement of tropical cyclone names in this basin as the list of names is only scheduled to be used once before a new list of names is drawn up. Should a named tropical cyclone move into the basin from the Western Pacific, it will retain its original name. The next six available names from the List of North Indian Ocean storm names are below.

  • Fani
  • Vayu (unused)
  • Hikaa (unused)
  • Kyarr (unused)
  • Maha (unused)
  • Bulbul (unused)

Pabuk entered the basin from the Gulf of Thailand as a cyclonic storm; its name was assigned by the Japan Meteorological Agency.

Season effects

This is a table of all storms in the 2019 North Indian Ocean cyclone season. It mentions all of the season's storms and their names, duration, peak intensities (according to the IMD storm scale), damage, and death totals. Damage and death totals include the damage and deaths caused when that storm was a precursor wave or extratropical low, and all of the damage figures are in 2019 USD.

NameDates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
PressureAreas affectedDamage
(USD)
DeathsRefs
Pabuk January 4 – 7Cyclonic storm85 km/h (50 mph)998 hPa (29.47 inHg) Thailand, Myanmar, Andaman Islands None None
Fani April 26 – May 4Extremely severe cyclonic storm215 km/h (130 mph)937 hPa (27.67 inHg) Nicobar Islands, Sri Lanka, East India, Bangladesh, Bhutan $1.81 billion89 [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18]
Season aggregates
2 systemsJanuary 4 – Season ongoing215 km/h (130 mph)937 hPa (27.67 inHg)$1.81 billion89

See also

Notes

    Related Research Articles

    Tropical cyclones are ranked on one of five tropical cyclone intensity scales, according to their maximum sustained winds and which tropical cyclone basin(s) they are located in. Only a few scales of classifications are used officially by the meteorological agencies monitoring the tropical cyclones, but some alternative scales also exist, such as accumulated cyclone energy, the Power Dissipation Index, the Integrated Kinetic Energy Index, and the Hurricane Severity Index.

    2008 North Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the North Indian ocean

    The 2008 North Indian cyclone season was one of the most disastrous seasons in modern history, with tropical cyclones leaving more than 140,000 people dead and causing nearly US$14 billion in damage. The season has no official bounds but cyclones tend to form between April and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean—the Bay of Bengal to the east of the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Sea to the west of India. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories. An average of four to six storms form in the North Indian Ocean every season with peaks in May and November. Cyclones occurring between the meridians 45°E and 100°E are included in the season by the IMD.

    Cyclone Akash North Indian cyclone in 2007

    Cyclone Akash was the first named tropical cyclone of the 2007 North Indian Ocean cyclone season. Warned by both India Meteorological Department (IMD) and Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), it formed from an area of disturbed weather on the Bay of Bengal on May 12, and gradually organized as it drifted northward. An eye began to develop as it approached land, and after reaching peak 3-min sustained winds of 85 km/h (50 mph) it struck about 115 km (70 mi) south of Chittagong in Bangladesh. Akash rapidly weakened over land, and advisories were discontinued on May 15.

    Below is a timeline of the 2007 North Indian Ocean cyclone season, documenting major events with regards to tropical cyclone formation, strengthening, weakening, landfall, extratropical transition, as well as dissipation. The 2007 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation.

    1998 North Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the North Indian ocean

    The 1998 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an active season in annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The season has no official bounds but cyclones tend to form between April and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean—the Bay of Bengal to the east of the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Sea to the west of India. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories. An average of four to six storms form in the North Indian Ocean every season with peaks in May and November. Cyclones occurring between the meridians 45°E and 100°E are included in the season by the IMD.

    1990 North Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the North Indian ocean

    The 1990 North Indian Ocean cyclone season featured a below average total of twelve cyclonic disturbances and one of the most intense tropical cyclones in the basin on record. During the season the systems were primarily monitored by the India Meteorological Department, while other warning centres such as the United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center also monitored the area. During the season, there were at least 1,577 deaths, while the systems caused over US$693 million in damages. The most significant system was the 1990 Andhra Pradesh cyclone, which was the most intense, damaging, and the deadliest system of the season.

    1991 North Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the North Indian ocean

    The 1991 North Indian Ocean Cyclone season was an extremely deadly and destructive season causing the deaths of more than 138,000 people and over $1.5 billion in damages. It was the period in which tropical cyclones formed to the north of the equator in the Indian Ocean. During the season tropical cyclones were monitored by the India Meteorological Department (IMD) and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. The IMD assigned all depressions that it monitored with BOB followed by a number in numerical order. The JTWC also assigned a number and either the letter A or B depending on where the depression was when the first advisory was issued.

    1994 North Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the North Indian ocean

    The 1994 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was the period in which tropical cyclones formed within the north Indian Ocean. The season has no official bounds but cyclones tend to form within this basin between April and December. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean — the Bay of Bengal to the east of the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Sea to the west of India. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories. An average of four to six storms form in the North Indian Ocean every season with peaks in May and November. Cyclones occurring between the meridians 45°E and 100°E are included in the season by the IMD.

    2009 North Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the North Indian ocean

    The 2009 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The North Indian Ocean cyclone season has no official bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean.

    1984 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1984 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was part of the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The season has no official bounds but cyclones tend to form between April and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean—the Bay of Bengal to the east of the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Sea to the west of India. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) releases unofficial advisories. An average of five tropical cyclones form in the North Indian Ocean every season with peaks in May and November. Cyclones occurring between the meridians 45°E and 100°E are included in the season by the IMD.

    Cyclone Rashmi North Indian cyclone in 2008

    Cyclone Rashmi was the seventh tropical cyclone of the 2008 North Indian Ocean cyclone season and second cyclonic storm, as well as the fifth tropical cyclone in the Bay of Bengal that year. A fairly weak tropical cyclone, it caused some notable damage in Bangladesh and India.

    Timeline of the 2009 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    This is a timeline of the 2009 North Indian Ocean cyclone season, which contains details of when a depression forms, strengthens, weakens, makes landfalls, and dissipates during the 2009 North Indian Ocean cyclone season. It also includes information from post-storm analysis by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), and the India Meteorological Department (IMD) who run the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in New Delhi, India. RSMC New Delhi's area of responsibility is officially between 45°E and 100E which is east of the Horn of Africa and west of the Malay Peninsula. There are two main seas within the North Indian Ocean, the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal. For storms, these are abbreviated as BOB and ARB by the IMD.

    2019 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

    The 2019 Pacific typhoon season is an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season runs throughout 2019, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Pabuk, developed on January 1, becoming the earliest-forming tropical storm of the western Pacific Ocean on record, breaking the previous record held by Typhoon Alice in 1979. The season's first typhoon, Wutip, reached typhoon status on February 20. Wutip further intensified into a super typhoon on February 23, becoming the strongest February typhoon on record, and the strongest tropical cyclone recorded in February in the Northern Hemisphere.

    2012 North Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the North Indian ocean

    The 2012 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The season had a late start, with the first system forming in October. During the season, only five systems formed, of which only two became cyclonic storms. Both the storms made landfall, and they, along with the deep depressions, were responsible for 128 deaths and economic losses worth at least $56.7 million.

    2013 North Indian Ocean cyclone season cyclone season in the North Indian ocean

    The 2013 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones formed in the North Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea. The season had no official bounds, but cyclones typically formed between May and December, with the peak from October to November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean.

    2015 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2015 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The North Indian Ocean cyclone season has no official bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with the peak from May to November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean.

    2017 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2017 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was a below average season in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. This season produced only three named storms, of which one only intensified into a very severe cyclonic storm. The North Indian Ocean cyclone season has no official bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with the two peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. The season began with the formation Cyclone Maarutha on April 15, and ended with the dissipation of a deep depression on December 9.

    Tropical cyclones in 2019 are spread out across seven different areas called basins and the Mediterranean Sea. Currently, 45 systems have formed during the year to date. 27 tropical cyclones have been named by either a Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) or a Tropical Cyclone Warning Center (TCWC).

    Cyclone Fani Tropical cyclone

    Extremely Severe Cyclonic Storm Fani was the strongest tropical cyclone to strike the Indian state of Odisha since Phailin in 2013. The second named storm and the first severe cyclonic storm of the 2019 North Indian Ocean cyclone season, Fani originated from a tropical depression that formed west of Sumatra in the Indian Ocean on 26 April. Vertical wind shear at first hindered the storm's development, but conditions became more favorable on 30 April. Fani rapidly intensified into an extremely severe cyclonic storm and reached its peak intensity on 2 May, as a high-end extremely severe cyclonic storm, and the equivalent of a high-end Category 4 major hurricane. Fani weakened before making landfall, and its convective structure rapidly degraded thereafter, degenerating into a remnant low on 4 May, and dissipating on the next day.

    Tropical Storm Pabuk (2019) Weak storm that struck the southern tip of Thailand in January 2019

    Tropical Storm Pabuk, also referred to as Cyclonic Storm Pabuk, was a weak storm that struck the Malay Peninsula in January 2019. It was also the earliest-forming storm in both the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and North Indian Ocean basins on record. Forming on the last day of 2018, Pabuk persisted into 2019, spanning two calendar years, and crossed into the North Indian Ocean basin several days later. The first tropical cyclone and named storm of the 2019 Pacific typhoon and North Indian Ocean cyclone seasons, Pabuk originated as a tropical disturbance in the South China Sea on December 28, 2018, which organized into a tropical depression on December 31. A day later, on January 1, 2019, the system intensified into a tropical storm and was named Pabuk. Pabuk made landfall in Thailand on January 4, emerging into the Bay of Bengal in the North Indian Ocean basin shortly afterward. Pabuk weakened after it entered the North Indian Ocean, eventually degenerating into a remnant low on January 7, before dissipating on the next day.

    References

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    2. RSMC — Tropical Cyclones New Delhi (2010). Report on Cyclonic Disturbances over North Indian Ocean during 2009 (PDF) (Report). India Meteorological Department. pp. 2–3. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-04-06. Retrieved May 24, 2011.
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    8. TC Advisory 15. India Meteorological Department (Report). 30 April 2019. Archived from the original on 30 April 2019. Retrieved 30 April 2019.
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    11. TC Advisory 30. India Meteorological Department (Report). Archived from the original on 4 May 2019. Retrieved 4 May 2019.
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    13. Ahmad, Adil. "India: Death toll from cyclone Fani climbs to 64". AA.com. Retrieved 12 May 2019.
    14. "Lightning kills 8 in Uttar Pradesh". New Indian Express. 3 May 2019. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
    15. "Cyclone Fani leaves trail of destruction in Bangladesh; 17 dead, several hurt". Northeast Now. 5 May 2019. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
    16. "Odisha estimates loss at ₹12,000 Cr due to cyclone Fani". The Hindu Business Line. 15 May 2019. Retrieved 16 May 2019.
    17. "Andhra Pradesh pegs loss due to Cyclone Fani at ₹58.62 crore". The Hindu. 5 May 2019. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
    18. "Fani storm loss estimated at Tk 536 crore". Banglanews24.com. 9 May 2019. Retrieved 9 May 2019.