Block (basketball)

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Cliff Alexander blocks a shot during the 2013 IHSA playoffs 20130307 Cliff Alexander blocks Paul White cropped.JPG
Cliff Alexander blocks a shot during the 2013 IHSA playoffs

In basketball, a block or blocked shot occurs when a defensive player legally deflects a field goal attempt from an offensive player to prevent a score. The defender is not allowed to make contact with the offensive player's hand (unless the defender is also in contact with the ball) or a foul is called. In order to be legal, the block must occur while the shot is traveling upward or at its apex. A deflected field goal that is made does not count as a blocked shot and simply counts as a successful field goal attempt for shooter plus the points awarded to the shooting team. For the shooter, a blocked shot is counted as a missed field goal attempt. Also, on a shooting foul, a blocked shot cannot be awarded or counted, even if the player who deflected the field goal attempt is different from the player who committed the foul. If the ball is heading downward when the defender hits it, it is ruled as goaltending and counts as a made basket. Goaltending is also called if the block is made after the ball bounces on the backboard (NFHS excepted; the NCAA also used this rule until the 2009–10 season).

Basketball team sport played on a court with baskets on either end

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one or more one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

Field goal (basketball) basket scored on any shot or tap other than a free throw, worth two or three points depending on the distance of the attempt from the basket

In basketball, a field goal is a basket scored on any shot or tap other than a free throw, worth two or three points depending on the distance of the attempt from the basket. Uncommonly, a field goal can be worth other values such as one point in FIBA 3x3 basketball competitions or four points in the BIG3 basketball league. "Field goal" is the official terminology used by the National Basketball Association (NBA) in their rule book, in their box scores and statistics, and in referees' rulings. The same term is also the official wording used by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and high school basketball.

In basketball, a foul is an infraction of the rules more serious than a violation. Most fouls occur as a result of illegal personal contact with an opponent and/or unsportsmanlike behavior. Fouls can result in one or more of the following penalties:

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Nicknames for blocked shots include "rejections," "stuffs," "bushed", "fudged", or notably "double-fudged" (two-handed blocks), "facials," "swats," "denials," and "packs." Blocked shots were first officially recorded in the NBA during the 1973–74 season.

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a men's professional basketball league in North America; composed of 30 teams. It is widely considered to be the premier men's professional basketball league in the world. The NBA is an active member of USA Basketball (USAB), which is recognized by FIBA as the national governing body for basketball in the United States. The NBA is one of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. NBA players are the world's best paid athletes by average annual salary per player.

Largely due to their height and position near the basket, centers and power forwards tend to record the most blocks, but shorter players with good jumping ability can also be blockers, an example being Dwyane Wade, the shortest player, at 6'4", to record 100 blocked shots in a single season. [1] A player with the ability to block shots can be a positive asset to a team's defense, as they can make it difficult for opposing players to shoot near the basket and by keeping the basketball in play, as opposed to swatting it out of bounds, a blocked shot can lead to a fast break, a skill Bill Russell was notable for. [2] [3] To be a good shot-blocker, a player needs great court sense and timing, and good height or jumping ability. One tactic is that a shot-blocker can intimidate opponents to alter their shots, resulting in a miss.

The center (C), also known as the five, or the big man, is one of the five positions in a regular basketball game. The center is normally the tallest player on the team, and often has a great deal of strength and body mass as well. In the NBA, the center is usually 6 feet 10 inches (2.08 m) or taller and usually weighs 240 pounds (110 kg) or more. They traditionally have played close to the basket in the low post. A center with the ability to shoot outside from three-point range is known as stretch five.

Power forward (basketball) position in the sport of basketball

The power forward (PF), also known as the four, is one of the five positions in a regulation basketball game. It has also been referred to as the "post" position. Power forwards play a role similar to that of center. They typically play offensively with their backs towards the basket and position themselves defensively under the basket in a zone defense or against the opposing power forward in man-to-man defense. The power forward position entails a variety of responsibilities, one of which is rebounding. Many power forwards are noted for their mid-range jump-shot, and several players have become very accurate from 12 to 18 feet. Earlier, these skills were more typically exhibited in the European style of play. Some power forwards, known as stretch fours, have since extended their shooting range to three-point field goals.

Dwyane Wade American basketball player

Dwyane Tyrone Wade Jr. is an American professional basketball player for the Miami Heat of the National Basketball Association (NBA). After a successful college basketball career with the Marquette Golden Eagles, Wade was drafted fifth overall in the 2003 NBA draft by Miami. In his third season, Wade led the Heat to their first NBA Championship in franchise history and was named the 2006 NBA Finals MVP. At the 2008 Summer Olympics, Wade led the United States men's basketball team, commonly known as the "Redeem Team", in scoring, and helped them capture the gold medal. In the 2008–09 season, Wade led the league in scoring and earned his first NBA scoring title. With LeBron James and Chris Bosh, Wade helped guide Miami to four consecutive NBA Finals from 2011 to 2014, winning back-to-back championships in 2012 and 2013. After 1​12 seasons away from the Heat with the Chicago Bulls and Cleveland Cavaliers, Wade was traded back to Miami in February 2018. A 13-time NBA All-Star, Wade is Miami's all-time leader in points, games, assists and steals, shots made and shots taken.

Chase-down block

Mirza Begic blocks Dusko Savanovic at the EuroBasket 2011 Serbia against Slovenia 2.jpg
Mirza Begić blocks Duško Savanović at the EuroBasket 2011

A chase-down block occurs when a player pursues an opposing player who had run ahead of the defense (as in a fast break), and then blocks their shot attempt. Often, the block involves hitting the ball into the backboard as the opponent tries to complete a lay-up. One of the most recognized chase-down blocks was then-Detroit Pistons' Tayshaun Prince's game-saving block on Reggie Miller in Game 2 of the 2004 NBA Eastern Conference Finals against the Indiana Pacers. [4] [5] Pistons announcer Fred McLeod, who first witnessed this style of blocks from Prince, created the chase-down term later with the Cleveland Cavaliers. [4] [5] During the 2008–09 NBA season, the Cavaliers began tracking chase-down blocks, crediting LeBron James with 23 that season and 20 the following season. [4] [5] [6] Another landmark chase-down block occurred in the 2016 NBA Finals when Lebron James, in the closing minutes of the 4th quarter delivered what became known as "The Block" on a lay-up attempt by Andre Iguodala with the score tied at 89 and 01:50 remaining in the game. [7] [8]

Fast break

Fast break is an offensive strategy in basketball and handball. In a fast break, a team attempts to move the ball up court and into scoring position as quickly as possible, so that the defense is outnumbered and does not have time to set up. The various styles of the fast break–derivative of the original created by Frank Keaney–are seen as the best method of providing action and quick scores. A fast break may result from cherry picking.

Detroit Pistons professional basketball team in the National Basketball Association

The Detroit Pistons are an American professional basketball team based in Detroit, Michigan. The Pistons compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the league's Eastern Conference Central Division and plays its home games at Little Caesars Arena. The team was founded in Fort Wayne, Indiana as the Fort Wayne (Zollner) Pistons in 1941, a member of the National Basketball League (NBL) where it won two NBL championships: in 1944 and 1945. The Pistons later joined the Basketball Association of America (BAA) in 1948. The NBL and BAA merged to become the NBA in 1949, and the Pistons became part of the merged league. Since moving to Detroit in 1957, the Pistons have won three NBA championships: in 1989, 1990 and 2004.

Tayshaun Prince American basketball player

Tayshaun Durell Prince is an American professional basketball executive and former player. The 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) small forward graduated from Dominguez High School before playing college basketball for the University of Kentucky. He was drafted 23rd overall by the Detroit Pistons in the 2002 NBA draft and went on to win a championship with the team in 2004.

Shot blocking records in the NBA

Elmore Smith American basketball player

Elmore Smith is an American retired professional basketball player born in Macon, Georgia. A 7'0" center from Kentucky State University, he played in the National Basketball Association from 1971 to 1979. He was a member of the Buffalo Braves, Los Angeles Lakers, Milwaukee Bucks, and Cleveland Cavaliers.

Manute Bol Sudanese-American basketball player

Manute Bol was a Sudanese-born American basketball player and political activist. Listed at 7 ft 7 in (2.31 m) tall, Bol was one of the two tallest players in the history of the National Basketball Association.

Mark Eaton (basketball) American basketball player

Mark E. Eaton is an American retired professional basketball player who was a member of the National Basketball Association's Utah Jazz from 1982 to 1993, with one NBA All-Star selection in 1989, and two NBA Defensive Player of the Year awards in 1985 and 1989. Though limited offensively, Eaton's 7 ft 4 in (2.24 m) height helped him become one of the best defensive centers in NBA history. Eaton holds the NBA record for most blocks in a season (456) and career average blocked shots per game (3.50).

Shot blocking records in NCAA Division I

Men

Shawn James Shawn James.jpg
Shawn James
Jarvis Varnado American basketball player

Jarvis Lamar Varnado is an American professional basketball player for Fos Provence Basket of the LNB Pro A. Varnado is known as a defensive specialist and is especially adept at shot blocking where he's aided by his large wingspan.

David Robinson (basketball) American basketball player

David Maurice Robinson is an American former professional basketball player, who played center for the San Antonio Spurs in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for his entire career. Based on his prior service as an officer in the United States Navy, Robinson earned the nickname "The Admiral".

Navy Midshipmen mens basketball

The Navy Midshipmen men's basketball team represents the United States Naval Academy, in Annapolis, Maryland, in NCAA Division I college basketball. The team competes in the Patriot League and plays its home games in Alumni Hall.

Women

See also

Footnotes

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The Block (basketball)

In basketball, The Block refers to a defensive play in Game 7 of the 2016 NBA Finals. With less than two minutes remaining in the deciding game of the championship series, Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James chased down Golden State Warriors forward Andre Iguodala and blocked Iguodala's layup attempt, ensuring the game remained tied. It is considered to be one of James' greatest clutch moments, and his performances across the series is considered to be the best in NBA history.

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References

  1. "The Legacy of Dwyane Wade: Is He The Last Elite Shooting Guard?". dish2swish.com. 10 July 2016.
  2. Bill Simmons (2010). The Book of Basketball: The NBA According to the Sports Guy. Random House Publishing Group. pp. 69, 404. ISBN   978-0-345-52010-4.
  3. Gregory, Sean; Wolff, Alexander. Richard O’Brien, ed. "The Game that Saved March Madness". Sports Illustrated. Mourning: “I would tell you this. Coach Thompson brought Bill Russell in to speak to me and Dikembe. And he’s like, Listen, if you block a shot into the stands, the opposing team does nothing but get the ball back. And he said if you have the ability to block shots, why not keep it inbounds? He said don’t swing at it. Direct it. I’ve never forgotten that.”
  4. 1 2 3 The Plain Dealer, Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James making the 'chase-down' block a signature move Archived 2016-05-09 at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved April 24, 2009.
  5. 1 2 3 Abrams, Jonathan. "On Defense, James Is Closer Than He Appears". The NY Times. Retrieved 11 June 2013.
  6. The Plain Dealer, Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James finishes second in NBA Defensive Player of the Year voting Archived 2016-04-14 at the Wayback Machine , accessed April 22, 2009.
  7. "13 Greatest Game 7 Performances In NBA Finals History". 2016-06-17. Retrieved 2016-07-30.
  8. Greenberg, Chris (June 20, 2016). "LeBron James gave Cleveland an iconic sports moment it wants to remember: 'The Block' ". Boston.com . Boston Globe Media Partners, LLC. Retrieved July 3, 2016. Cleveland, no matter how hard it may have tried, couldn’t forget 'The Drive' or 'The Fumble' or 'The Shot.' But now, thanks to LeBron James, it has a sports moment requiring the definite article that it will want to remember forever: The Block.
  9. "NBA & ABA Career Leaders and Records for Blocks Per Game - Basketball-Reference.com". Basketball-Reference.com.
  10. 1 2 Hawkins, Stephen (September 6, 2013). "Griner still chasing AIAW shot-block record of 801". Waco Tribune. Associated Press . Retrieved February 27, 2014.