Three-point play

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In basketball, a three-point play is usually achieved by scoring a two-point field goal, being fouled in the act of shooting, and scoring one point on the subsequent free throw. Before the three-point field goal was created in the 1960s for professional basketball and 1980s for collegiate basketball, it was the only way to score three points on a single possession. It is sometimes called an old-fashioned three-point play to distinguish from the later three-point shot. [1] [2] And one is also sometimes used to refer to the extra free throw after a two-point basket. [3]

In FIBA-sanctioned 3-on-3 play (branded as 3x3), a "three-point" or "four-point play" is possible only under very limited circumstances. In that form of the game, field goals taken inside the "three-point" arc are worth only 1 point, and field goals made from outside the arc are worth 2 points.


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References

  1. "Men's Basketball Survives at the RAC; Outlasts Rutgers, 84-71, in OT". Shupirates.com. 2008-01-31. Retrieved 2008-05-12.
  2. "Clutch Play Late Seals Bama Win". Scout.com. 2008-02-02. Retrieved 2008-05-12.
  3. "NBA "And One" Stats". 82games.com. Retrieved 2013-06-10.