Turnover (basketball)

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In basketball, a turnover occurs when a team loses possession of the ball to the opposing team before a player takes a shot at their team's basket. This can result from the ball being stolen, the player making mistakes such as stepping out of bounds, illegal screen, a double dribble, having a pass intercepted, throwing the ball out of bounds, three-second violation, five-second violation, or committing an error such as traveling, a shot clock violation, palming, a backcourt violation, or committing an offensive foul. A technical foul against a team that is in possession of the ball is a blatant example of a turnover, because the opponent is awarded a free throw in addition to possession of the ball.

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Some players are prone to turnovers because of havingpoor court vision[ clarify ] or making.mental mistakes[ clarify ] Also, many superstars average more turnovers than anybody on their team as they will often be handling the ball. A point guard may often have the most turnovers because they are usually the player that possesses the ball most for their respective team.

According to Boston Globe sportswriter Bob Ryan, the concept of the turnover was first formulated by his colleague Jack Barry. [1] Turnovers were first officially recorded in the NBA during the 1977–78 season and ABA during the 1967–68 season.

Records

The record for the most turnovers in an NBA game is shared by Jason Kidd and John Drew. Kidd committed 14 turnovers against the New York Knicks on November 17, 2000 while playing for the Phoenix Suns. Drew committed 14 turnovers against the New Jersey Nets on March 1, 1978 while playing for the Atlanta Hawks. The record for most turnovers in an NBA playoff game was 13, set by James Harden on May 27, 2015 while playing for the Houston Rockets against the Golden State Warriors. [2] The WNBA has recorded turnovers since its inaugural season in 1997. The record for the most turnovers by a WNBA team in one game is 33. The record for the most turnovers by a WNBA player per season is held by Ticha Penicheiro, who committed 135 turnovers in 1999. [3] The career record for the most turnovers by a WNBA player is held by Becky Hammon, who committed 1224 turnovers. [4]

See also

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Basketball is a ball game and team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules. Since being developed by James Naismith as a non-contact game that almost anyone can play, basketball has undergone many different rule variations, eventually evolving into the NBA-style game known today. Basketball is one of the most popular and widely viewed sports in the world.

In basketball, a common violation is the most minor class of illegal action. Most violations are committed by the team with possession of the ball, when a player mishandles the ball or makes an illegal move. The typical penalty for a violation is loss of the ball to the other team. This is one type of turnover.

References

  1. Ryan, Bob. "Bob Ryan says goodbye after 44 years". The Boston Globe. Retrieved January 19, 2018.
  2. "TOV playoff". Yahoo Sports. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  3. "Leaders". Basketball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 9, 2015.
  4. "TOV career". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 9, 2015.