Basketball statistics

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Statistics in basketball are kept to evaluate a player's or a team's performance.

Contents

Examples

Examples of basketball statistics include:[ citation needed ]

Averages per game are denoted by *PG (e.g. BLKPG or BPG, STPG or SPG, APG, RPG and MPG). Sometime the players statistics are divided by minutes played and multiplied by 48 minutes (had he played the entire game), denoted by * per 48 min. or *48M.

A player who makes double digits in a game in any two of the PTS, REB, AST, STL, and BLK statistics is said to make a double double; in three statistics, a triple double; in four statistics, a quadruple double. A quadruple double is extremely rare (and has only occurred four times in the NBA). There is also a 5x5, when a player records at least a 5 in each of the 5 statistics. [1]

The NBA also posts to the statistics section of its Web site a simple composite efficiency statistic, denoted EFF and derived by the formula, ((Points + Rebounds + Assists + Steals + Blocks) ((Field Goals Attempted Field Goals Made) + (Free Throws Attempted Free Throws Made) + Turnovers)). [2] While conveniently distilling most of a player's key statistics in one numerical score, the formula is not highly regarded by the statistics community, with the alternative Player Efficiency Rating developed by ESPN basketball statistician John Hollinger being more widely used to compare the overall efficiency of players.

Tempo-free statistics

Examples of tempo-free statistics including the following [3] [4]

Fantasy leagues

In fantasy basketball, [5] statistics are used in a formula as the measurement of a player's performance.

See also

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References

  1. "5x5's in NBA History". nbahoopsonline.com.
  2. "NBA Stats - Glossary". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on September 7, 2013. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  3. Pomeroy, Ken (August 1, 2005). "Four Factors". kenpom.com. Retrieved April 6, 2015.
  4. "Tempo-Free Stats for Dummies". Vox Media. November 10, 2009. Retrieved April 6, 2015.
  5. Fantasy basketball, fasketball.com, 2015-08-20, archived from the original on 2015-12-29, retrieved 2015-08-20