Time line (basketball)

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The time line, in basketball, is a name for the center line that reflects the rule that the offensive team has a limited amount of time to advance the ball past this line, from the backcourt to the frontcourt, in a scoring drive.

Contents

The time line may have a name that reflects the amount of time, such as "10-second line" or "8-second line". Correspondingly, a violation of the rule may be called a 10-second violation or an 8-second violation.

History

The rule was introduced in 1933. It was basketball's first time restriction on possession of the ball, predating the shot clock by over two decades. FIBA and the NBA specified 10 seconds, but adopted an 8-second limit in 2000 and 2001, respectively.

In college basketball, the interval remains 10 seconds.

Procedure

The time limit is marked off by an official waving his arm to visibly count, if there is no shot clock available or the shot clock is turned off. However, women's college basketball introduced the 10-second limit in 2013–14, and provided that officials will not count the ten seconds but "will use the shot clock to determine if a 10-second violation has occurred." The referee calls a violation if the offense still has the ball in the backcourt when the shot clock has counted down from 30 to 20 and now shows 19 (which first occurs at 19.9 seconds left). [1] Men's college basketball has had the same rule since 2015-16, when the shot clock changed from 35 seconds to 30 seconds. In the NBA and FIBA, the shot clock marks off the 8-second count.

Analogs in other sports

In field lacrosse, a team has 20 seconds to get the ball across the midfield line any way it can, and then 10 seconds to get the ball into its opponents' goal box. To satisfy the latter limit it is not necessary that a player in possession of the ball enter the box; although that is the most common way of doing so, that count is ended if the ball simply touches the ground inside the box. Officials typically use a timer for the 20-second count, as they may also at the same time be counting the four seconds a defensive player is allowed to stay in the goal crease with the ball, and count off the ten seconds manually.

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Shot clock

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Glossary of basketball terms Wikipedia glossary

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The Trent Tucker Rule is a basketball rule that disallows any regular shot to be taken on the court if the ball is put into play with under 0.3 seconds left in game or shot clock. The rule was adopted in the 1990–91 season and named after New York Knicks player Trent Tucker, and officially adopted in FIBA play starting in 2010. When the WNBA was established in 1997, this rule was adopted too.

In basketball, the five-second rule, or five-second violation, is a rule that helps promote continuous play. There are multiple situations where a five-second violation may occur.

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Basketball is a ball game and team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules. Since being developed by James Naismith as a non-contact game that almost anyone can play, basketball has undergone many different rule variations, eventually evolving into the NBA-style game known today. Basketball is one of the most popular and widely viewed sports in the world.

In basketball, a common violation is the most minor class of illegal action. Most violations are committed by the team with possession of the ball, when a player mishandles the ball or makes an illegal move. The typical penalty for a violation is loss of the ball to the other team. This is one type of turnover.

Big3

Big3 is a 3-on-3 basketball league founded by hip hop musician and actor Ice Cube and entertainment executive Jeff Kwatinetz. The league consists of twelve teams whose rosters include both former NBA players and international players. The rules enforced in Big3 games contain major deviations from the official rules of 3-on-3 basketball as administered by FIBA. In January 2020, Big3 announced its rule set would be the core of a new basketball variant called "Fireball3".

References

  1. Johnson, Greg (November 5, 2013). "Women's basketball puts 10-second backcourt rule in effect for first time". NCAA. Retrieved January 18, 2014.