Basket interference

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In basketball, basket interference is the violation of (a) touching the ball or any part of the basket (including the net) while the ball is on the rim of the basket, (b) touching the ball when it is within the cylinder extending upwards from the rim, (c) reaching up through the basket from below and touching the ball, whether it is inside or outside the cylinder, or (d) pulling down on the rim of the basket so that it contacts the ball before returning to its original position, or during a shot attempt.. [1] [2] How the ball gets into the cylinder or onto the basket is irrelevant under high school and NCAA rules; e.g., a pass touched within the cylinder is basket interference, even though such a play may not score a goal. [3] This similar play under (W)NBA rules would not be basket interference. [4]

There is one exception to the above: if a player dunks the ball, they may maintain contact with the ball into the cylinder or grab the rim (momentarily) without penalty. [5] [6]

When a basket interference violation is called against the defending team, the shooting team is awarded the points for the field goal as if it had been made. [7] [8] When a basket interference violation is called against the shooting team, no points are scored and the ball is given to the defending team. [7] [9]

Basket interference and goaltending are the only violations in basketball for which points are automatically awarded. [10]

FIBA has rules on basket interference. FIBA Art.31.2.4 (2014) – interference occurs under certain conditions when a player touches the ball, basket, rim, or backboard in a motion that "the ball has been prevented from entering the basket or has been caused to enter the basket." [11]

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Womens basketball Basketball played by women

Women's basketball was developed in the late 1800s in tandem with its men's counterpart. It became popular, spreading from the east coast of the United States to the west coast, in large part via women's colleges. From 1895 until 1970, the term "women's basketball" was also used to refer to netball, which evolved in parallel with modern women's basketball. It is mostly popular in America.

Basketball court Rectangular playing surface, with baskets at each end

In basketball, the basketball court is the playing surface, consisting of a rectangular floor, with baskets at each end. In professional or organized basketball, especially when played indoors, it is usually made out of a wood, often maple, and highly polished and completed with a 10 foot rim. Outdoor surfaces are generally made from standard paving materials such as concrete or asphalt.

Shot clock

A shot clock is a countdown timer used in basketball that provides a set amount of time that a team may possess the ball before attempting to score a field goal. It is distinct from the game clock, which displays the time remaining in the period of play. It may be colloquially known as the 24-second clock, particularly in the NBA and other leagues where that is the duration of the shot clock. If the shot clock reaches zero before the team attempts a field goal, the team has committed a shot clock violation, which is penalized with a loss of possession.

Free throw Penalty in basketball

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Personal foul (basketball)

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Goaltending Illegal blocking of downward traveling shot in basketball

In basketball, goaltending is the violation of interfering with the ball while it is on its way to the basket and it is (a) in a downward flight (b) above the basket ring and within the imaginary cylinder and (c) not touching the rim. In NCAA & (W)NBA, goaltending is also called if the ball has already touched the backboard while being above the height of the rim in its flight, regardless of it being in an upward or downward flight or whether it is directly above the rim. Goaltending in this context defines by exclusion what is considered a legal block of a field goal. In high school and NCAA basketball, goaltending is also called when a player interferes with a free throw at any time in its flight towards the basket. If goaltending is called for interference with a field goal, the shooting team is awarded the points for the field goal as if it had been made. The team who commits the violation then inbounds the ball at its baseline, the same as if it had conceded a basket. In high school and NCAA basketball, if goaltending is called on a free throw, the shooting team is awarded one point and a technical foul is called against the offending player.

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References

  1. 2009-2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Rules Archived 2012-08-06 at the Wayback Machine Rule 4, Section 5, Article 2. Retrieved July 27, 2010
  2. NBA Official Rules (2009-2010) Rule 11, Section I, a, b, f, and h. Retrieved July 27, 2010
  3. 2009-2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Case Book A.R. 224. Retrieved July 27, 2010
  4. NBA Officials Media Guide Archived 2012-01-11 at the Wayback Machine 2009-2010 NBA Casebook. Question 164. Retrieved July 27, 2010
  5. NBA Official Rules (2009-2010) Rule 11, Section I, a. EXCEPTION. Retrieved July 27, 2010
  6. 2009-2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Rules Archived 2012-08-06 at the Wayback Machine Rule 4, Section 5, Article 3. Retrieved July 27, 2010
  7. 1 2 NBA Official Rules (2009-2010) Rule 11, Section I, i. PENALTY Retrieved July 27, 2010
  8. 2009-2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Rules Archived 2012-08-06 at the Wayback Machine Rule 9, Section 17, Article 1. Retrieved July 27, 2010
  9. 2009–2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Rules Archived 2012-08-06 at the Wayback Machine Rule 9, Section 17, Article 3. Retrieved July 27, 2010
  10. 2009-2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Rules Archived 2012-08-06 at the Wayback Machine Rule 5, Section 1, Article 8. Retrieved July 27, 2010
  11. "FIBA Official Basketball Rules 2014" (PDF). FIBA.com. FIBA. Retrieved May 14, 2015.