Donald Tsang

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  1. 1 2 Donald Tsang was awarded KBE in 1997 for the 30-year service to Hong Kong, [1] [2] and therefore entitled to use the title of "Sir". Tsang, however, chooses not to use the title in official capacity. [3] If the knighthood is used in the title, the individual shall be called (The Honourable) Sir Donald Tsang. [4] [5]

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References

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Donald Tsang
曾蔭權
Donald Tsang WEF.jpg
Tsang at the 2012 World Economic Forum
2nd Chief Executive of Hong Kong
In office
21 June 2005 30 June 2012
Government offices
Preceded by Secretary for the Treasury
1993–1995
Succeeded by
Preceded by Financial Secretary of Hong Kong
1995–2001
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Chief Secretary for Administration
2001–2005
Succeeded by
Preceded by Chief Executive of Hong Kong
2005–2012
Succeeded by
President of Executive Council
2005–2012
Order of precedence
Preceded by
Tung Chee-hwa
Former Chief Executives
Hong Kong order of precedence
Former Chief Executives
Succeeded by
Leung Chun-ying
Former Chief Executives