Esophageal motility disorder

Last updated
Esophageal motility disorder
Other namesEsophageal dysmotility (ED)
Treatmenttreatment depends on cause

An esophageal motility disorder (EMD) is any medical disorder causing difficulty in swallowing, regurgitation of food and a spasm-type pain which can be brought on by an allergic reaction to certain foods. The most prominent one is dysphagia.

Contents

Esophageal motility disorder may be a result of CREST syndrome, referring to the five main features: calcinosis, Raynaud syndrome, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia. [1]

Symptoms

There are contractions along the lower esophagus when this condition happens. These contractions prevent the passage of food. [2]

Types

Dysphagia could be for solid only or for solid and liquid.

If there is a food alergy causing an EMD, then physicians recommend an elimination diet. If this fails, then physicians will prescribe special types of to help resolve this problem.

See also

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Telangiectasia small dilated blood vessels[1] near the surface of the skin or mucous membranes

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Diffuse esophageal spasm

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Aphagia is the inability or refusal to swallow. The word is derived from the Ancient Greek prefix α, meaning "not" or "without," and the suffix φαγία, derived from the verb φαγεῖν, meaning "to eat." It is related to dysphagia which is difficulty swallowing, and odynophagia, painful swallowing. Aphagia may be temporary or long term, depending on the affected organ. It is an extreme, life-threatening case of dysphagia. Depending on the cause, untreated dysphagia may develop into aphagia.

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Esophageal disease gastrointestinal system disease that is located in the esophagus

Esophageal diseases can derive from congenital conditions, or they can be acquired later in life.

Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis

Esophageal intramucosal pseudodiverticulosis is a rare condition wherein the wall of the esophagus develops numerous small outpouchings (pseudodiverticulae). Individuals with the condition typically develop difficulty swallowing. The outpouchings represent the ducts of submucosal glands of the esophagus. It typically affects individuals in their sixth and seventh decades of life. While it is associated with certain chronic conditions, particularly alcoholism, diabetes and gastroesophageal reflux disease, the cause of the condition is unknown. Treatment involves medications to treat concomitant conditions such as reflux and esophageal spasm, and dilation of strictures in the esophagus.

References

  1. Winterbauer RH (1964). "Multiple telangiectasia, Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, and subcutaneous calcinosis: a syndrome mimicking hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia". Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins Hospital 114: 31–83. PMID   14171636.
  2. Medicine, UW. "Esophageal Motility Disorders - UW Medicine". www.uwmedicine.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-27. Retrieved 2015-01-10.
Classification
D
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