Pripyat

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Pripyat

Припʼять
Prypiat
Pripyat (02710024).jpg
Prypiat
Coat of Arms of Pripyat.svg
Coat of arms
Kiev oblast location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Pripyat
Ukraine adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Pripyat
Coordinates: 51°24′17″N30°03′25″E / 51.40472°N 30.05694°E / 51.40472; 30.05694
CountryFlag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
Oblast Flag of Kyiv Oblast.svg  Kyiv Oblast
Founded4 February 1970
City rights1979
Government
  Administration State Agency of Ukraine on Exclusion Zone Management
Elevation
[1]
111 m (364 ft)
Population
 (2020)
  Total0
 (ca 49,360 in 1986)
Time zone UTC+02:00 (EET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+03:00 (EEST)
Postal code
none (formerly 01196)
Area code(s) +380 4499 [2]

Pripyat ( /ˈprpjət,ˈprɪp-/ PREE-pyət, PRIP-yət; Russian : При́пять, romanized: Pripyatʹ) or Prypiat (Ukrainian : При́пʼять, romanized: Prypiat, IPA:  [ˈprɪpjɐtʲ] ) is a ghost town in northern Ukraine, near the Ukraine–Belarus border. Named after the nearby river Pripyat, the town was founded on February 4, 1970, as the ninth "atomgrad", a type of closed town in the Soviet Union, to serve the nearby Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. [3] It was officially proclaimed a city in 1979 and had grown to a population of 49,360 [4] by the time it was evacuated on the afternoon of 27 April 1986, the day after the Chernobyl disaster. [5]

Contents

Although Pripyat is located within the administrative district of Vyshhorod Raion (prior to the 2020 raion reform Ivankiv Raion) the abandoned municipality now has the status of city of oblast significance within the larger Kyiv Oblast (province) and is administered directly from Kyiv. Pripyat is also supervised by Ukraine's Ministry of Emergencies, which manages activities for the entire Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

History

Background

Panoramic view of Pripyat in May 2009 Pripyat panorama 2009-001.jpg
Panoramic view of Pripyat in May 2009
View of the Chernobyl power plant including 2003 radioactive level of 763 microroentgens per hour Chernobylpowerplantradioactivity.jpg
View of the Chernobyl power plant including 2003 radioactive level of 763 microroentgens per hour

Access to Pripyat, unlike cities of military importance, was not restricted before the disaster, as the Soviet Union deemed nuclear power stations safer than other types of power plants. Nuclear power stations were presented as achievements of Soviet engineering, harnessing nuclear power for peaceful projects. The slogan "peaceful atom" (Russian : мирный атом, romanized: mirnyy atom) was popular during those times. The original plan had been to build the plant only 25 km (16 mi) from Kyiv, but the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, among other bodies, expressed concern that would be too close to the city. As a result, the power station and Pripyat [6] were built at their current locations, about 100 km (62 mi) from Kyiv. After the disaster, the city of Pripyat was evacuated in two days. [7]

Pripyat Panorama.JPG
A panorama of Pripyat during summer. The Chernobyl power plant, currently undergoing decommissioning, is visible in the distance, at top center.

Post-Chernobyl years

Pripyat amusement park, as seen from the City Center Gymnasium Pripyat01.jpg
Pripyat amusement park, as seen from the City Center Gymnasium
The Azure Swimming Pool was still in use by liquidators in 1996, a decade after the Chernobyl incident. October 1996-Swimming Pool.jpg
The Azure Swimming Pool was still in use by liquidators in 1996, a decade after the Chernobyl incident.
In 2009, over two decades after the Chernobyl incident, the Azure Swimming Pool shows decay after years of disuse. Swimming Pool Hall 4 Pripyat.jpg
In 2009, over two decades after the Chernobyl incident, the Azure Swimming Pool shows decay after years of disuse.

In 1986, the city of Slavutych was constructed to replace Pripyat. After the city of Chernobyl, this was the second-largest city for accommodating power plant workers and scientists in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS).

One notable landmark often featured in photographs of the city and visible from aerial-imaging websites is the long-abandoned Ferris wheel located in the Pripyat amusement park, which had been scheduled to have its official opening five days after the disaster, in time for May Day celebrations. [8] [9] The Azure Swimming Pool and Avanhard Stadium are two other popular tourist sites.

On 4 February 2020, former residents of Pripyat gathered in the abandoned city to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Pripyat's establishment. [10]

During the 2020 Chernobyl Exclusion Zone wildfires, the flames reached the outskirts of the town; they did not reach the plant.[ citation needed ]

Infrastructure and statistics

Pripyat before the Chernobyl disaster A Picture Of Prypiat, pictured before the Chernobyl Disaster to add Context to what the city was like.jpg
Pripyat before the Chernobyl disaster

The following statistics are from 1 January 1986. [11]

Safety

The external relative gamma dose for a person in the open near the Chernobyl disaster site. The intermediate lived fission products like Cs-137 contribute nearly all of the gamma dose now after a number of decades have passed, see opposite. Totalexternaldoseratecher.png
The external relative gamma dose for a person in the open near the Chernobyl disaster site. The intermediate lived fission products like Cs-137 contribute nearly all of the gamma dose now after a number of decades have passed, see opposite.
The impact of the different isotopes on the radioactive contamination of the air soon after the accident. Drawn using data from the OECD report and the second edition of 'The radiochemical manual'. AirDoseChernobylVector.svg
The impact of the different isotopes on the radioactive contamination of the air soon after the accident. Drawn using data from the OECD report and the second edition of 'The radiochemical manual'.

A concern is whether it is safe to visit Pripyat and its surroundings. The Zone of Alienation is considered relatively safe to visit, and several Ukrainian companies offer guided tours around the area. [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] In most places within the city, the level of radiation does not exceed an equivalent dose of 1 μSv (one microsievert) per hour. [21]

Climate

The climate of Pripyat is designated as Dfb (Warm-summer humid continental climate) on the Köppen Climate Classification System. [22]

Climate data for Pripyat
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °C (°F)−3
(27)
−1.4
(29.5)
3.7
(38.7)
13.2
(55.8)
20.3
(68.5)
23.5
(74.3)
24.6
(76.3)
23.9
(75.0)
18.8
(65.8)
11.8
(53.2)
4.3
(39.7)
−0.1
(31.8)
11.6
(53.0)
Daily mean °C (°F)−6.1
(21.0)
−4.7
(23.5)
0.1
(32.2)
8.4
(47.1)
14.8
(58.6)
18.0
(64.4)
19.1
(66.4)
18.4
(65.1)
13.7
(56.7)
7.8
(46.0)
1.8
(35.2)
−2.6
(27.3)
7.4
(45.3)
Average low °C (°F)−9.1
(15.6)
−9
(16)
−3.5
(25.7)
3.7
(38.7)
9.3
(48.7)
12.6
(54.7)
13.7
(56.7)
12.9
(55.2)
8.6
(47.5)
3.8
(38.8)
−0.7
(30.7)
−5.1
(22.8)
3.1
(37.6)
Source: [23]

Films

(Alphabetical by title)

Games

(Alphabetical by game title)

Literature

(Alphabetical by artist)

Music

(Alphabetical by artist)

Television

(Alphabetical by series)

Transport

The city was served by Yaniv station on the Chernihiv–Ovruch railway. It was an important passenger hub of the line and was located between the southern suburb of Pripyat and the village of Yaniv. An electric train terminus of Semikhody, built in 1988 and located in front of the nuclear plant, is currently the only operating station near Pripyat connecting it to Slavutych. [43]

Personalities

See also

Related Research Articles

Chernobyl Ghost city in Kyiv Oblast, Ukraine

Chernobyl, also known as Chornobyl, is a partially abandoned city in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, situated in the Vyshhorod Raion of northern Kyiv Oblast, Ukraine. Chernobyl is about 90 kilometres (60 mi) north of Kyiv, and 160 kilometres (100 mi) southwest of the Belarusian city of Gomel. Before its evacuation, the city had about 14,000 residents, while around 1,000 people live in the city today.

Pripyat (river) River in Eastern Europe

The Pripyat or Prypiat is a river in Eastern Europe, approximately 761 km (473 mi) long. It flows east through Ukraine, Belarus, and Ukraine again, draining into the Dnieper.

Chernobyl Exclusion Zone Exclusion area and disaster area in Ukraine

The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Zone of Alienation is an officially designated exclusion zone around the site of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster. It is also commonly known as the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, the 30 Kilometre Zone, or simply The Zone.

Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioned nuclear power plant in Ukraine

The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP), officially the Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov Lenin Nuclear Power Plant, is a closed nuclear power plant located near the abandoned city of Pripyat in northern Ukraine, 16.5 kilometers (10 mi) northwest of the city of Chernobyl, 16 kilometers (10 mi) from the Belarus–Ukraine border, and about 100 kilometers (62 mi) north of Kyiv. The plant was cooled by an engineered pond, which is fed by the Pripyat River about 5 kilometers (3 mi) northwest from its juncture with the Dnieper.

This article is about the cultural impact of the Chernobyl disaster, the world's largest nuclear accident, which occurred on April 26, 1986.

Slavutych city in Kyiv Oblast, Ukraine

Slavutych is a city in northern Ukraine, purposely built for the evacuated personnel of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant after the 1986 disaster that occurred near the city of Pripyat. Geographically located within Chernihiv Raion, Chernihiv Oblast, Slavutych is administratively subordinated to the Kyiv Oblast. In 2020 the city had a population of 24,784

Red Forest Forest within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone in Ukraine

The Red Forest is the 10-square-kilometer area surrounding the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant within the Exclusion Zone located in Polesia. The name "Red Forest" comes from the ginger-brown color of the pine trees after they died following the absorption of high levels of radiation from the Chernobyl accident on 26 April 1986. In the post-disaster cleanup operations, the Red Forest was bulldozed and buried in "waste graveyards". The site of the Red Forest remains one of the most contaminated areas in the world today.

Pripyat amusement park Amusement park closed down after Chernobyl disaster

The Pripyat amusement park is an abandoned amusement park located in Pripyat, Ukraine. It was to have its grand opening on 1 May 1986, in time for the May Day celebrations, but these plans were cancelled on 26 April, when the Chernobyl disaster occurred a few kilometers away. Several sources report that the park was opened for a short time on 27 April before the announcement to evacuate the city was made, and one site shows photos of the amusement park in operation. Theories that the park was hurriedly opened in the aftermath of the accident to distract Pripyat residents from the unfolding disaster nearby seem to be substantiated by video showing that some of the rides were never fully completed. It is more likely and generally held that the video was taken in winter, due to clothing worn, and it was a test. Considering the lack of panic at the time of evacuation, there was no need to distract people. In any case, the park—and its Ferris wheel in particular—have become a symbol of the Chernobyl disaster.

Alexander Sirota

Alexander Yukhymovych Sirota ; is a Ukrainian photographer, journalist, filmmaker. He writes in Russian and Ukrainian. As a former resident of Pripyat, he is an eyewitness and a victim of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster. He has devoted many articles, photographs, and video reports to the city of Pripyat and to the Chernobyl catastrophe. He is the editor-in-chief of the internet project "pripyat.com" and the president of the International Public Organization "Center Pripyat.com". In May 2008, he became the winner of the ІХ-th international competition "Golden George" of films, TV-programs, and internet projects about protective law and law enforcement. In that competition, Alexander won "The Big Tape of George" award for his website devoted to Chernobyl. He is a member of the Union of Journalists of Ukraine since 2008 and a member if International Federation of Journalists.

The Chernobyl disaster, considered the worst nuclear disaster in history, occurred on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, then part of the Soviet Union, now in Ukraine. From 1986 onward, the total death toll of the disaster has lacked consensus; as peer-reviewed medical journal The Lancet and other sources have noted, it remains contested.

Yaniv (village) Village in Kyiv Oblast, Ukraine

Yaniv is a Ukrainian abandoned village of the Kyiv Oblast, located south of Pripyat and west of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

FC Stroitel Pripyat Football club

FC Stroitel Pripyat was a Soviet and Ukrainian football club (team) from Pripyat, Kyiv Oblast. Founded in the 1970s, it competed only at republican level competitions in Ukraine. Before the Chernobyl disaster the team was playing at a small stadium in Prypiat. In 1986 for it there was built new home ground the Avanhard Stadium, at which the club never had a chance to play.

Chernihiv–Ovruch railway

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Chernobyl Raion

The Chornobyl Raion was one of 26 administrative raions (districts) of Kyiv Oblast in northern Ukraine. After the Chernobyl disaster, the majority of the raion was contaminated, and many of its populated places were included into the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, which is an officially designated exclusion area around the site of the disaster.

Avanhard Stadium (Pripyat)

Avanhard Stadium is an abandoned football stadium in Pripyat, Ukraine. It was built to become the home ground of FC Stroitel Pripyat, however due to the Chernobyl disaster it was never realized. It was named, like several other grounds, after the Ukrainian sports society trade union. The town of Pripyat was evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster on 26 April 1986, which occurred a few kilometers away.

Azure Swimming Pool Swimming pool in Pripyat, Ukraine

The Azure Swimming Pool is one of the indoor swimming pools in the abandoned city of Pripyat, Ukraine, which was affected by the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

Jupiter (factory)

The Jupiter Factory is an abandoned factory located on the outskirts of Pripyat, in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone in northern Ukraine. Officially a manufacturer of cassette recorders and components for home appliances, the factory secretly produced semiconductor components for the military, and had test workshops for robotic systems.

Markiyan Kamysh

Markiyan Kamysh is a Ukrainian novelist.

2020 Chernobyl Exclusion Zone wildfires Forest fires in Chernobyl zone

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Commons-logo.svg Media related to Pripyat at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 51°24′20″N30°03′25″E / 51.40556°N 30.05694°E / 51.40556; 30.05694