Thomas Slye House

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Thomas Slye House
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Location Southern side of 184th St. east of its junction with Iowa Highway 62
Nearest city Andrew, Iowa
Coordinates 42°11′29″N90°36′15″W / 42.19139°N 90.60417°W / 42.19139; -90.60417 Coordinates: 42°11′29″N90°36′15″W / 42.19139°N 90.60417°W / 42.19139; -90.60417
Area less than one acre
Built 1860
Architectural style Vernacular
MPS Limestone Architecture of Jackson County MPS
NRHP reference # 92000911 [1]
Added to NRHP July 24, 1992

The Thomas Slye House is a historic residence located north of Andrew, Iowa, United States. It is one of over 217 limestone structures in Jackson County from the mid-19th century, of which 101 are houses. The Slye house features a five bay symmetrical facade capped by a gable roof. Slye, a native of England, quarried the stones for the house himself and had a stonemason construct the house. The stones are of various sizes and shapes and laid in courses. The double end chimneys are found on only two other stone houses in the county, and the Slye and DeFries houses have them constructed in brick. [2] Also similar to the DeFries House is the use of jack arches instead on lintels above the windows and doors. It is possible that both houses were constructed by the same stonemason. [2] A single-story frame addition with an attached two-car garage was built onto the back of the houses at a later date. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. [1]

Andrew, Iowa City in Iowa, United States

Andrew is a city in Jackson County, Iowa, United States. The population was 434 at the 2010 census.

Jackson County, Iowa County in the United States

Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Iowa. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,848. The county seat is Maquoketa.

Bay (architecture) space defined by the vertical piers, in a building

In architecture, a bay is the space between architectural elements, or a recess or compartment. Bay comes from Old French baee, meaning an opening or hole.

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