Torba Province

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Coordinates: 13°45′S167°30′E / 13.750°S 167.500°E / -13.750; 167.500

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Torba in Vanuatu Torba in Vanuatu.svg
Torba in Vanuatu
Flag of Torba Province Flag of Torba (Vanuatu) Province.svg
Flag of Torba Province

Torba (or TorBa) is the northernmost province of Vanuatu. It consists of the Banks Islands and the Torres Islands.

The province's name is derived from the initial letters of "TORres" and "BAnks".

Population

Detailed map of Torba province (Torres-Banks) Vanuatu-Torres-Banks.png
Detailed map of Torba province (Torres-Banks)

The province has a population of 9,359 [1] and an area of 882 square kilometres (341 square miles). Its capital is Sola on Vanua Lava.

Islands

These are the main islands of Torba Province, excluding smaller and uninhabited islets.

Banks Islands
NamePopulationArea in km2
Gaua 2,491342
Kwakéa 261.2
Merelava 64718
Merig 120.5
Mota 6839.5
Motalava 1,45124
Ra 1890.5
Ureparapara 43739
Vanua Lava 2,597314
Torres Islands
NamePopulationArea in km2
Hiw 26951
Linua 02.5
Lo 21011.9
Metoma 133
Tegua 5830.8
Toga 27618.8

Languages

The Torba province has seventeen languages, [2] [3] all Oceanic — from north to south: Hiw, Lo-Toga, Lehali, Löyöp, Volow, Mwotlap, Lemerig, Vera'a, Vurës, Mwesen, Mota, Nume, Dorig, Koro, Olrat, Lakon, Mwerlap. [4]

With 550 speakers per language on average (17 for 9,300 people), Torba is one of the linguistically densest areas of Vanuatu – itself the country with the highest density of languages per capita in the world.

Related Research Articles

The nine South Vanuatu languages form a family of the Southern Oceanic languages, spoken in Tafea Province of Vanuatu.

The Central Vanuatu languages form a linkage of Southern Oceanic languages spoken in central Vanuatu.

The North Vanuatu languages form a linkage of Southern Oceanic languages spoken in northern Vanuatu.

Koro is an Oceanic language spoken on Gaua island in Vanuatu. Its 280 speakers live in the village of Koro, on the south coast of Gaua.

Nume is an Oceanic language spoken on Gaua island in Vanuatu. Its 700 speakers live on the northeast coast of Gaua.

Löyöp is an Oceanic language spoken by about 240 people, on the east coast of Ureparapara Island in the Banks Islands of Vanuatu. It is distinct from Lehali, the language spoken on the west coast of the same island.

Polonombauk is a language of the interior of the southeast of Santo Island in Vanuatu.

The Espiritu Santo languages are a group of North Vanuatu languages spoken on Espiritu Santo Island in northern Vanuatu. Tryon (2010) considers the Espiritu Santo languages to be a coherent group.

Dalkalaen is a Central Vanuatu language spoken by about 1,000 people on the southwestern tip of Ambrym Island, Vanuatu.

Moiso is an Espiritu Santo language of Vanuatu. It is spoken in Moriuli village in central Santo Island by about 100 people.

Kene is an Espiritu Santo language of Vanuatu with 300 speakers.

Daruru is an Espiritu Santo language of Vanuatu. There are perhaps 100 speakers in Pelmol village of western Santo Island.

Retlatur is an Espiritu Santo language of Vanuatu. There are about 100 speakers in Tanovusivusi village of southern Santo Island.

Atin is an Espiritu Santo language of Vanuatu. There are 120 speakers in Nambauk (Patunfarambu) and Fumatal villages of eastern Santo Island.

Farnanto is an Espiritu Santo language of Vanuatu. There are about 100 speakers in Nambauk, Tanmet, and Tafua villages of eastern Santo Island.

Fanafo is an Espiritu Santo language of Vanuatu. It is spoken by 20 people in Vanafo and Butmas villages of eastern Santo Island.

Rutan is a Malakula language of Vanuatu.

Alovas is a Malakula language of Vanuatu.

Najit is a Malakula language of Vanuatu. There are fewer than 5 speakers.

Njav is a Malakula language of Vanuatu. There are about 10 speakers.

References

  1. "2009 National Census of Population and Housing: Summary Release" (PDF). Vanuatu National Statistics Office. 2009. Retrieved October 11, 2010.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. François (2012).
  3. List and map of the 17 languages of Torba province.
  4. François et al. (2015).

Bibliography