Waverly, Tennessee

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Waverly, Tennessee
City
Humphreys-county-courthouse-tn1.jpg
Humphreys County Courthouse in Waverly
Humphreys County Tennessee Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Waverly Highlighted 4778560.svg
Location of Waverly in Humphreys County, Tennessee.
Coordinates: 36°5′9″N87°47′13″W / 36.08583°N 87.78694°W / 36.08583; -87.78694 Coordinates: 36°5′9″N87°47′13″W / 36.08583°N 87.78694°W / 36.08583; -87.78694
CountryUnited States
State Tennessee
County Humphreys
Incorporated1838 [1]
Named for Waverley Novels of Sir Walter Scott [1]
Area
  Total8.77 sq mi (22.7 km2)
  Land8.77 sq mi (22.7 km2)
  Water0.0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation
535 ft (163 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total4,105
  Estimate 
(2018) [2]
4,080
  Density468.1/sq mi (180.7/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
37185
Area code(s) 931 Exchange: 296
FIPS code 47-78560 [3]
GNIS feature ID1273950 [4]
Website waverlytn.org

Waverly is a city in and the county seat of Humphreys County, Tennessee, United States. [5] The population was 4,105 at the 2010 census. [6]

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Humphreys County, Tennessee U.S. county in Tennessee

Humphreys County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 18,538. Its county seat is Waverly.

Tennessee U.S. state in the United States

Tennessee is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Tennessee is bordered by eight states, with Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the west, and Missouri to the northwest. The Appalachian Mountains dominate the eastern part of the state, and the Mississippi River forms the state's western border. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, with a 2017 population of 667,560 and a 2017 metro population of 1,903,045. Tennessee's second largest city is Memphis, which had a population of 652,236 in 2017.

Contents

History

Waverly was established by Steven Pavatt as a stop along the stagecoach road between Nashville and Memphis in the early 19th century. Pavatt was a fan of the author Sir Walter Scott, and named the community after Scott's Waverley Novels. When Humphreys County was created in 1803, Reynoldsburg, located northwest of Waverly along the Tennessee River, was chosen as the county seat. However, when county lands on the west bank of the Tennessee split off to become part of the newly created Benton County in 1835, the Humphreys County seat was moved to Waverly, which had become the more central location in the county. A courthouse was built in 1836, and the town was officially incorporated in 1838. [1]

Walter Scott 18th/19th-century Scottish historical novelist, poet and playwright

Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet was a Scottish historical novelist, poet, playwright and historian. Many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature. Famous titles include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, Old Mortality, The Lady of the Lake, Waverley, The Heart of Midlothian and The Bride of Lammermoor.

Waverley Novels

The Waverley Novels are a long series of novels by Sir Walter Scott (1771–1832). For nearly a century, they were among the most popular and widely read novels in all of Europe.

Benton County, Tennessee U.S. county in Tennessee, United States

Benton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 16,489. Its county seat is Camden. The county was created in December 1835 and organized in 1836.

THC marker in Waverly recalling the now-defunct town of Reynoldsburg Waverly-tennessee-reynoldsburg1.jpg
THC marker in Waverly recalling the now-defunct town of Reynoldsburg

Like most of Middle and West Tennessee, Waverly was staunchly pro-Confederacy during the American Civil War. Humphreys County voted unanimously in favor of secession in 1861. Union troops occupied the town in 1863 to guard the railroad between White Bluff and Johnsonville (now Old Johnsonville), the latter being a Federal supply depot and transfer station. The Union troops managed to build a fort at the courthouse square, although they were constantly harassed by Confederate guerillas. On November 4, 1864, Confederate troops under Nathan Bedford Forrest attacked and destroyed the Federal depot in what became known as the Battle of Johnsonville. [1] The battle occurred approximately 10 miles (16 km) west of Waverly at the mouth of Trace Creek.

Confederate States of America (de facto) federal republic in North America from 1861 to 1865

The Confederate States of America — commonly referred to as the Confederacy — was an unrecognized republic in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865. The Confederacy was originally formed by seven secessionist slave-holding states—South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas—in the Lower South region of the United States, whose economy was heavily dependent upon agriculture, particularly cotton, and a plantation system that relied upon the labor of African-American slaves. Convinced that white supremacy and the institution of slavery were threatened by the November 1860 election of Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln to the U.S. presidency on a platform which opposed the expansion of slavery into the western territories, the Confederacy declared its secession in rebellion to the United States, with the loyal states becoming known as the Union during the ensuing American Civil War. Confederate Vice President Alexander H. Stephens described its ideology as being centrally based "upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery, subordination to the superior race, is his natural and normal condition".

American Civil War Internal war in the U.S. over slavery

The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people. War broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North, which also included some geographically western and southern states, proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights in order to uphold slavery.

Secession is the withdrawal of a group from a larger entity, especially a political entity, but also from any organization, union or military alliance. Threats of secession can be a strategy for achieving more limited goals. It is, therefore, a process, which commences once a group proclaims the act of secession. It could involve a violent or peaceful process but these do not change the nature of the outcome, which is the creation of a new state or entity independent from the group or territory it seceded from.

Hurricane Mills, located a few miles south of Waverly along TN-13, was the site of a substantial mill and carding factory in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. A Mississippian-era prehistoric village (known as the Duck River Temple Mounds or Link Farm Site) [7] and a farm owned by Jesse James were both located near the Link farm site in the vicinity of Hurricane Mills. [1]

Hurricane Mills, Tennessee Unincorporated community in Tennessee, United States

Hurricane Mills is an unincorporated community in Humphreys County, Tennessee, United States. Its ZIP code is 37078.

Carding Process that disentangles, cleans and intermixes fibres

Carding is a mechanical process that disentangles, cleans and intermixes fibres to produce a continuous web or sliver suitable for subsequent processing. This is achieved by passing the fibers between differentially moving surfaces covered with card clothing. It breaks up locks and unorganised clumps of fibre and then aligns the individual fibers to be parallel with each other. In preparing wool fibre for spinning, carding is the step that comes after teasing.

Mississippian culture Mound-building Native American culture in Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States

The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American civilization that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1600, varying regionally. It was composed of a series of urban settlements and satellite villages (suburbs) linked together by loose trading networks. The largest city was Cahokia, believed to be a major religious center.

On February 24, 1978, a propane tank car explosion occurred in downtown Waverly when an L&N train derailed. The explosion, which killed 16 people, led to an overhaul of the methods used by the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency when responding to hazardous material spills. [8]

The Waverly, Tennessee, tank car explosion was an explosion that occurred at approximately 2:58 p.m. on Friday, February 24, 1978, in Waverly, Tennessee, following a train derailment incident days earlier. A tank car containing liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) exploded as a result of cleanup related to this derailment.

Louisville and Nashville Railroad defunct American Class I railway

The Louisville and Nashville Railroad, commonly called the L&N, was a Class I railroad that operated freight and passenger services in the southeast United States.

Tennessee Emergency Management Agency Disaster response agency for the state of Tennessee

The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) is an agency of Tennessee government tasked with preparing for and responding to natural and man-made disasters across the state of Tennessee. The agency is headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee. TEMA is a component of the Tennessee Military Department, along with the Tennessee National Guard and the Tennessee State Guard.

Geography

Waverly is located at 36°5′9″N87°47′13″W / 36.08583°N 87.78694°W / 36.08583; -87.78694 (36.085847, −87.786917). [9] The city is situated in the Trace Creek Valley, just over 10 miles (16 km) east of the creek's confluence with the Kentucky Lake impoundment of the Tennessee River. The low ridges that "wall in" Waverly to the north and south represent the fringe of the western section of the Highland Rim.

Kentucky Lake lake in the United States of America

Kentucky Lake is a major navigable reservoir along the Tennessee River in Kentucky and Tennessee. Created in 1944 by the Tennessee Valley Authority's impounding of the Tennessee River by Kentucky Dam, the 160,309-acre (649 km2) lake is the largest artificial lake by surface area in the United States east of the Mississippi River, with 2,064 miles of shoreline, although the nearby Lake Barkley is larger by volume. Kentucky Lake has a flood storage capacity of 4,008,000 acre-feet, more than 2.5 times of the next largest lake in the TVA system.

Tennessee River river in the United States, its largest city is Knoxville, TN

The Tennessee River is the largest tributary of the Ohio River. It is approximately 652 miles (1,049 km) long and is located in the southeastern United States in the Tennessee Valley. The river was once popularly known as the Cherokee River, among other names, as many of the Cherokee had their territory along its banks, especially in eastern Tennessee and northern Alabama. Its current name is derived from the Cherokee village Tanasi.

The Highland Rim is a geographic term for the area in Tennessee surrounding the Central Basin. Nashville is largely surrounded by higher terrain in all directions.

Waverly is centered on the junction of U.S. Route 70, which connects the city to Nashville to the east and Memphis to the west, and State Route 13, which connects the city to Hurricane Mills and Interstate 40 to the south and the rural areas around Erin to the north.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.1 square miles (21 km2), all of it land.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 174
1860 28865.5%
1870 207−28.1%
1880 510146.4%
1900 786
1910 94720.5%
1920 1,05411.3%
1930 1,1529.3%
1940 1,31814.4%
1950 1,89243.6%
1960 2,89152.8%
1970 3,79431.2%
1980 4,40516.1%
1990 3,925−10.9%
2000 4,0282.6%
2010 4,1051.9%
Est. 20184,080 [2] −0.6%
Sources: [10] [11]

As of the 2010 census, there were 4,105 people with a population density of 468.1 inhabitants per square mile (180.7/km2). There were 1,877 housing units at an average density of 214 per square mile (83/km2). [6]

As of the 2000 census, [3] the racial makeup of the city was 88.75% White, 9.51% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.37% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. 1.17% of the population is Hispanic or Latino of any race.

North Court Square in Waverly Waverly-tennessee-ncourtsq1.jpg
North Court Square in Waverly

There were 1,716 households out of which 27.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.8% were non-families. 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 24.4% from 45 to 64, and 19.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,614, and the median income for a family was $44,375. Males had a median income of $30,610 versus $19,297 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,139. About 10.9% of families and 15.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.0% of those under age 18 and 15.1% of those age 65 or over.

Notable residents


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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "History of Humphreys County Tennessee". Humphreys County Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on May 16, 2007.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  3. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  5. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  6. 1 2 "Tennessee: 2010, Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. September 2012. p. 27.
  7. National Register of Historic Places; Item #73001791, Record #365523.
  8. "The Waverly Explosion". Tennessee Emergency Management Agency. 2001. Archived from the original on May 16, 2006.
  9. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  10. "Census of Population and Housing: Decennial Censuses". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved March 4, 2012.
  11. "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 11, 2013. Retrieved December 11, 2013.
  12. "Susan Goodman Wins Mrs. American Pageant". Ocala Star-Banner . 39 (243). May 1, 1983. Retrieved December 19, 2013.