Crossville, Tennessee

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Crossville, Tennessee
City of Crossville
Crossville-Main-Street-tn1.jpg
Main Street in Downtown Crossville
Flag of Crossville, Tennessee.svg
Crossville-seal.jpg
Cumberland County Tennessee Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Crossville Highlighted 4718540.svg
Location of Crossville in Cumberland County, Tennessee
Coordinates: 35°57′15″N85°1′53″W / 35.95417°N 85.03139°W / 35.95417; -85.03139 Coordinates: 35°57′15″N85°1′53″W / 35.95417°N 85.03139°W / 35.95417; -85.03139
Country United States
State Tennessee
County Cumberland
Established1856
Incorporated1901 [1]
Named for Intersection of two early roads [2]
Government
  MayorJames Mayberry
Area
[3]
  Total20.86 sq mi (54.03 km2)
  Land20.45 sq mi (52.95 km2)
  Water0.42 sq mi (1.08 km2)
Elevation
[4]
1,857 ft (566 m)
Population
 (2020) [5]
  Total12,071
  Density590.41/sq mi (227.96/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP codes
38555, 38557, 38558, 38571, 38572
Area code 931
FIPS code 47-18540 [6]
GNIS feature ID1306203 [4]
Website crossvilletn.gov

Crossville is a city in and the county seat of Cumberland County, Tennessee, United States. [7] It is part of the Crossville, TN Micropolitan Statistical Area. [8] The population was 12,071 at the 2020 census. [9]

Contents

History

Crossville developed at the intersection of a branch of the Great Stage Road, which connected the Knoxville area with the Nashville area, and the Kentucky Stock Road, a cattle drovers' path connecting Middle Tennessee with Kentucky and later extending south to Chattanooga. These two roads are roughly paralleled by modern US-70 and US-127, respectively. [10] [11]

1939 photo of Crossville's Piggly Wiggly, which at the time was located at the corner of Main and 2nd Piggly Wiggly grocery - NARA - 280994.jpg
1939 photo of Crossville's Piggly Wiggly, which at the time was located at the corner of Main and 2nd

Around 1800, an early American settler named Samuel Lambeth opened a store at this junction, and the small community that developed around it became known as Lambeth's Crossroads. The store was located at what has become the modern intersection of Main Street and Stanley Street, just south of the courthouse. By the time a post office was established in the 1830s, the community had taken the name of "Crossville". In the early 1850s, James Scott, a merchant from nearby Sparta, purchased the Lambeth store and renamed it Scott's Tavern. [2]

When Cumberland County was formed in 1856, Crossville, being nearest the center of the county, was chosen as county seat. Scott donated the initial 40 acres (160,000 m2) for the erection of a courthouse and town square. [2]

Crossville and Cumberland County suffered rampant pillaging throughout the Civil War as the well-developed roads made the area accessible to both occupying Union and Confederate forces and bands of renegade guerrillas. With divided communities and families, there was vicious guerrilla warfare, and residents suffered as if there were major battles in the area. [12] The county was divided throughout the conflict, sending a roughly equal number of troops to both sides. [13]

After World War I, U.S. 70 helped connect the town and area to markets for its produce and goods. Additional highways built after World War II improved transportation in the region. [13]

During the Great Depression, the federal government's Subsistence Homestead Division initiated a housing project south of Crossville known as the Cumberland Homesteads. The project's purpose was to provide small farms for several hundred impoverished families. The project's recreational area would later become the nucleus for Cumberland Mountain State Park. [13] In 1934, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt visited Crossville and the Cumberland Homesteads Project.

Crossville was a sundown town as late as the 1950s, with a sign at the city limits warning African Americans not to stay after nightfall. [14]

Geography

Crossville has long been a great crossroads of East and Middle Tennessee. Crossville-tennessee-signfusion1.jpg
Crossville has long been a great crossroads of East and Middle Tennessee.

Crossville is located at the center of Cumberland County at 35°57′15″N85°1′53″W / 35.95417°N 85.03139°W / 35.95417; -85.03139 (35.954221, -85.031267). [15] The city is situated atop the Cumberland Plateau amidst the headwaters of the Obed River, which slices a gorge north of Crossville en route to its confluence with the Emory River to the northeast. Crossville is roughly halfway between the plateau's eastern escarpment along Walden Ridge and its western escarpment along the Highland Rim. Several small lakes are located on the outskirts of Crossville, including Lake Tansi to the south, Lake Holiday to the west, and Byrd Lake at nearby Cumberland Mountain State Park. The average elevation of Crossville is approximately 1,890 feet (580 m) above sea level.

Crossville developed at the intersection of two major stage roads by which settlers moved through the area. The roads were gradually widened, improved and turned into paved roads. Two major federal highways: U.S. Route 70, which traverses Tennessee from east to west, and U.S. Route 127, which traverses Tennessee from north to south, now roughly follow the old routes. Interstate 40, which runs roughly parallel to U.S. 70, passes through the northern part of Crossville. Crossville is approximately 35 miles (56 km) east of Cookeville, 80 miles (130 km) north of Chattanooga, and 70 miles (110 km) west of Knoxville.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Crossville has a total area of 20.3 square miles (52.7 km2), of which 20.0 square miles (51.7 km2) is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2), or 1.95%, is water. [9]

Climate

Crossville has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa), with warm summers and cool winters. Temperatures in Crossville are moderated by the city's high elevation and the Cumberland Plateau. Precipitation is abundant and evenly distributed (although the early autumn months are drier), with an average of 55.55 in (1,411 mm). Snowfall is moderate and somewhat common, with an average of 14.2 in (36 cm).

Climate data for Crossville, Tennessee (1991–2020 normals, extremes 1912–present)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)74
(23)
77
(25)
82
(28)
91
(33)
95
(35)
102
(39)
102
(39)
102
(39)
103
(39)
90
(32)
80
(27)
73
(23)
103
(39)
Average high °F (°C)41.6
(5.3)
45.4
(7.4)
53.6
(12.0)
63.5
(17.5)
71.6
(22.0)
78.5
(25.8)
81.8
(27.7)
81.1
(27.3)
75.9
(24.4)
65.7
(18.7)
54.1
(12.3)
45.1
(7.3)
63.2
(17.3)
Daily mean °F (°C)33.4
(0.8)
36.7
(2.6)
44.3
(6.8)
53.5
(11.9)
61.8
(16.6)
69.0
(20.6)
72.5
(22.5)
71.4
(21.9)
65.6
(18.7)
54.8
(12.7)
44.4
(6.9)
37.0
(2.8)
53.7
(12.1)
Average low °F (°C)25.1
(−3.8)
28.0
(−2.2)
35.0
(1.7)
43.5
(6.4)
52.0
(11.1)
59.6
(15.3)
63.2
(17.3)
61.7
(16.5)
55.3
(12.9)
43.8
(6.6)
34.6
(1.4)
28.9
(−1.7)
44.2
(6.8)
Record low °F (°C)−25
(−32)
−15
(−26)
−6
(−21)
14
(−10)
28
(−2)
33
(1)
40
(4)
41
(5)
27
(−3)
15
(−9)
−7
(−22)
−17
(−27)
−25
(−32)
Average precipitation inches (mm)5.49
(139)
5.66
(144)
6.08
(154)
6.07
(154)
5.35
(136)
5.27
(134)
5.31
(135)
4.14
(105)
4.28
(109)
3.68
(93)
4.70
(119)
6.54
(166)
62.57
(1,589)
Average snowfall inches (cm)3.5
(8.9)
4.4
(11)
2.7
(6.9)
0.2
(0.51)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.2
(0.51)
3.1
(7.9)
14.1
(36)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)15.213.214.313.113.613.312.810.99.69.811.414.0151.2
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in)4.13.21.40.10.00.00.00.00.00.00.22.411.4
Source: NOAA [16] [17]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1870 95
1880 994.2%
1890 266168.7%
1910 763
1920 94824.2%
1930 1,12819.0%
1940 1,51134.0%
1950 2,29151.6%
1960 4,668103.8%
1970 5,38115.3%
1980 6,39418.8%
1990 6,9308.4%
2000 8,98129.6%
2010 10,79520.2%
2020 12,07111.8%
Sources: [18] [5]

2020 census

Crossville racial composition [19]
RaceNumberPercentage
White (non-Hispanic)10,57287.58%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)1110.92%
Native American 250.21%
Asian 1931.6%
Pacific Islander 10.01%
Other/Mixed 4043.35%
Hispanic or Latino 7656.34%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 12,071 people, 5,040 households, and 2,777 families residing in the city.

2000 census

As of the census [6] of 2000, there were 8,981 people, 3,795 households, and 2,440 families residing in the city. The population density was 609.2 people per square mile (235.2/km2). There were 4,268 housing units at an average density of 289.5 per square mile (111.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.12% White, 0.04% African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.04% from other races, and 1.18% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 2.43% of the population.

There were 3,795 households, out of which 27.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.2% were married couples living together, 15.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.7% were non-families. 31.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.79.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 22.6% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 26.5% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 19.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 85.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $25,796, and the median income for a family was $33,207. Males had a median income of $26,735 versus $20,217 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,066. About 21.7% of families and 24.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.2% of those under age 18 and 20.6% of those age 65 or over.

Recent population estimates show the population of Crossville around 11,498 in 2008.

Points of interest

Palace Theatre The Palace Theater.jpg
Palace Theatre
Native Stone Museum, one of many buildings in Crossville built of Crab Orchard Stone Crossville Tennessee Highway Patrol Building.jpg
Native Stone Museum, one of many buildings in Crossville built of Crab Orchard Stone

Notable people

Further reading

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References

  1. Tennessee Blue Book , 2005-2006, pp. 618-625.
  2. 1 2 3 Bullard and Krechniak, Cumberland County's First Hundred Years, 180-188.
  3. "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 15, 2022.
  4. 1 2 U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Crossville, Tennessee
  5. 1 2 "Census Population API". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Oct 15, 2022.
  6. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  8. United States Census Bureau, Crossville, TN Micropolitan Statistical Area. Retrieved: 25 June 2013.
  9. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Crossville city, Tennessee". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved July 7, 2015.
  10. Helen Bullard and Joseph Krechniak, Cumberland County's First Hundred Years (Crossville, Tenn.: Centennial Committee, 1956), 22-26
  11. The WPA Guide to Tennessee (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1986), 442. Originally compiled by the Federal Writers' Project of the Works Project Administration as Tennessee: A Guide to the State, and published in 1939.
  12. Larry H. Whiteaker, "Civil War", Tennessee Encyclopedia of Culture and History, 2009, accessed 7 November 2011
  13. 1 2 3 G. Donald Brookhart, "Cumberland County", Tennessee Encyclopedia of Culture and History, 2009, accessed 7 November 2011
  14. Rowan, Carl T. (March 1, 1951). "How Far From Slavery? Segregation Is 'Great Debate'". Minneapolis Morning Tribune . Minneapolis. p. 1 via Newspapers.com. I have been in Crossville before—but not for long. No Negroes are allowed to live here. On a tree near the city limits is this sign: 'Nigger, don't let the sun set on you here.' Since it is early morning and the sun long has set, I remain aboard the bus for the 20-minute stop here. I do see two Negro passengers going down a corridor into the kitchen for sandwiches, however. But even in this all-white community (one Negro family lived just outside it eight years ago, but has moved now) I can write about progress in the south—progress that would be noticed only by a Negro grown sensitive to the little shades of race relations.
  15. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  16. "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  17. "Station: Crossville ED & Research, TN". U.S. Climate Normals 2020: U.S. Monthly Climate Normals (1991-2020). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  18. "Census of Population and Housing: Decennial Censuses". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-03-04.
  19. "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved 2021-12-27.
  20. Palace Theatre official website. Accessed 19 July 2016.
  21. Cumberland County Playhouse official site. Accessed 19 July 2016.
  22. TAP Publishing official site. Accessed 19 July 2016.
  23. Gary Nelson, Flying Spaghetti Monster takes up residence at county courthouse, Crossville Chronicle, March 24, 2008
  24. Gary Nelson, "Courthouse No Longer Hosting Free Speech Displays." The Crossville Chronicle, 15 April 2008. Retrieved: 10 July 2008.
  25. "Mandy Barnett". Mandy Barnett. Retrieved 2021-08-25.
  26. http://www.julieannemery.com/
  27. "Miss Teen USA : News". Archived from the original on 2009-08-04. Retrieved 2009-08-01.
  28. http://www.michaelsimsbooks.com/