Weriyeng

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Weriyeng (also spelled Warieng) [1] is one of the last two schools of traditional navigation found in the central Caroline Islands in Micronesia, the other being Fanur. [2] By tradition these two schools were considered to be the most high of all the schools of navigation that once dotted the islands of the central Carolines. By tradition the Weriyeng school was founded on the island of Pulap, which is today in the Pattiw region of Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia.

Navigation The process of monitoring and controlling the movement of a craft or vehicle from one place to another

Navigation is a field of study that focuses on the process of monitoring and controlling the movement of a craft or vehicle from one place to another. The field of navigation includes four general categories: land navigation, marine navigation, aeronautic navigation, and space navigation.

Caroline Islands archipelago

The Caroline Islands are a widely scattered archipelago of tiny islands in the western Pacific Ocean, to the north of New Guinea. Politically they are divided between the Federated States of Micronesia in the eastern part of the group, and Palau at the extreme western end. Historically, this area was also called Nuevas Filipinas or New Philippines as they were part of the Spanish East Indies and governed from Manila in the Philippines.

Micronesia Subregion of Oceania

Micronesia is a subregion of Oceania, composed of thousands of small islands in the western Pacific Ocean. It has a shared cultural history with two other island regions: Polynesia to the east and Melanesia to the south.

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Mau Piailug is one of the most famous navigators of this school. He trained the well-known modern Hawaiian wayfinder Nainoa Thompson. [3]

Mau Piailug Micronesian navigator from the Carolinian island of Satawal and a teacher of traditional, non-instrument wayfinding methods for deep-sea voyaging

Pius "Mau" Piailug was a Micronesian navigator from the Carolinian island of Satawal, best known as a teacher of traditional, non-instrument wayfinding methods for open-ocean voyaging. Mau's Carolinian navigation system, which relies on navigational clues using the Sun and stars, winds and clouds, seas and swells, and birds and fish, was acquired through rote learning passed down through teachings in the oral tradition. He earned the title of master navigator (palu) by the age of eighteen, around the time the first American missionaries arrived in Satawal. As he neared middle age, Mau grew concerned that the practice of navigation in Satawal would disappear as his people became acculturated to Western values. In the hope that the navigational tradition would be preserved for future generations, Mau shared his knowledge with the Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS). With Mau's help, PVS used experimental archaeology to recreate and test lost Hawaiian navigational techniques on the Hōkūle‘a, a modern reconstruction of a double-hulled Hawaiian voyaging canoe.

Nainoa Thompson Native Hawaiian navigator

Charles Nainoa Thompson is a Native Hawaiian navigator and the president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. He is best known as the first Hawaiian to practice the ancient Polynesian art of navigation since the 14th century, having navigated two double-hulled canoes from Hawaiʻi to other island nations in Polynesia without the aid of western instruments.

Palu (master navigator) in this school

Notes

  1. Gladwin, Thomas (1970). East Is a Big Bird. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. p. 200. ISBN   0-674-22425-6.
  2. Woodward, David (1998). History of Cartography. University of Chicago Press. p. 470. ISBN   0-226-90728-7 . Retrieved 2010-08-04.
  3. "Pius "Mau" Piailug". Polynesian Voyaging Society.


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