Vaka katea

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Vaka katea are the traditional sailing double canoe watercraft of the Cook Islands. [1]

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Various Māori traditions recount how their ancestors set out from their homeland in waka hourua, large double-hulled ocean-going canoes (waka). Some of these traditions name a mythical homeland called Hawaiki.

Tākitimu was a waka (canoe) with whakapapa throughout the Pacific particularly with Samoa, the Cook Islands, and New Zealand in ancient times. In several Māori traditions, the Tākitimu was one of the great Māori migration ships that brought Polynesian migrants to New Zealand from Hawaiki. The canoe was said to be captained by Tamatea.

Māori mythology

Māori mythology and Māori traditions are two major categories into which the remote oral history of New Zealand's Māori may be divided. Māori myths concern 'out of this world' tales relating to the origins of what was the observable world for the pre-European Māori, often involving gods and demigods. Māori tradition concerns more folkloric legends often involving historical or semi-historical forebears. Both categories merge in whakapapa to explain the overall origin of the Māori and their connections to the world which they lived in.

Pahi

Pahi were the traditional double-hulled sailing watercraft of Tahiti. They were large, two masted, and rigged with crab claw sails.

Nukutere was one of the Māori migration canoes that brought Polynesian migrants to New Zealand. Nukutere is one of the lesser known canoes. However, the descendants of the Nukutere migrants can be found in Ngāi Tūhoe, Ngāti Porou and in other eastern Bay of Plenty iwi.

Te Aratāwhao was a Māori waka constructed by early Māori settlers in the Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand. The craft was purpose-built to supply kumara from Hawaiki to New Zealand. Captained by Tama-ki-hikurangi, Te Aratāwhao withstood the journey from Whakatane to Hawaiki. However, Te Aratāwhao and her captain remained in Hawaiki, while the crew returned to New Zealand with the supplies in another canoe, the Mataatua.

Vaa

Vaʻa is a word in Samoan, Hawaiian and Tahitian which means 'boat', 'canoe' or 'ship'. A larger traditional seagoing vessel for long distance voyages is referred to as vaʻa tele. The term alia is also used for larger vessels in Samoa. The smaller vaʻa used for fishing typically have a float, or outrigger, attached to the main hull for stability. This outrigger part of the canoe is called ama in various Polynesian languages.

Te Aitanga-a-Hauiti

Te Aitanga-a-Hauiti is a Māori iwi (tribe) on the East Coast of New Zealand's North Island. Its rohe covers the area from Tawhiti-a-Paoa Tokomaru Bay to Te Toka-a-Taiau Gisborne on the East Coast of the North Island of New Zealand.

Ngāti Tamaterā Māori iwi (tribe) in Aotearoa New Zealand

Ngāti Tamaterā is a Māori iwi (tribe) of the Hauraki region of New Zealand, descended from Tamaterā, the second son of Marutūāhu. It is a major tribe within the Marutūāhu confederation and its leaders have been prominent in Hauraki history and Marutūāhu tribal affairs.

In Māori tradition, Tauira was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that was used in the migrations that settled New Zealand. Tauira was captained by Mōtataumaitawhiti and landed at Te Kaha in the eastern Bay of Plenty. Panenehu and Te Whānau-ā-Apanui iwi trace their ancestry back to Tauira.

In Māori tradition, Te Aratauwhāiti was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that was used in the migrations that settled New Zealand. Te Aratauwhāiti was captained by Tīwakawaka, and was one of the earliest waka to reach New Zealand, making landfall at Whakatane.

In Māori tradition, Te Kōhatuwhenua was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that was used in the migrations that settled New Zealand. Taranaki iwi Ngāti Ruanui and Ngā Rauru trace their ancestry back to Taikehu, the captain of Te Kōhatuwhenua.

In Māori tradition, Te Wakatūwhenua was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that were used in the migrations that settled New Zealand. Te Wakatūwhenua is said to have landed at Cape Rodney, its crew suffering a mysterious illness.

In Māori tradition, Tinana was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that was used in the migrations that settled New Zealand.

Uruaokapuarangi was one of the great ocean-going, voyaging canoes that was used in the migrations that settled the South Island according to Māori tradition.

Kalia (watercraft)

Kalia is the Tongan adaptation of a drua or double-hulled Polynesian sailing watercraft.

ʻalia is the Samoan adaptation of a drua or double-hulled Polynesian sailing watercraft.

Va'a-tele are large, traditional Samoan double canoe multihull watercraft.

Te Tau Ihu Māori

Te Tau Ihu Māori are a group of Māori iwi in the upper South Island of New Zealand. It includes Ngāti Kuia, Rangitāne and Ngāti Apa, Ngāti Koata, Ngāti Rārua and Ngāti Toa, and Ngāti Tama and Te Āti Awa.

References

  1. Taonui, Rāwiri (22 September 2012). "'Canoe navigation – Waka – canoes', Te Ara". Te Ara: The Encyclopedia of New Zealand . p. 1. Retrieved 12 January 2015.