1091

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1091 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1091
MXCI
Ab urbe condita 1844
Armenian calendar 540
ԹՎ ՇԽ
Assyrian calendar 5841
Balinese saka calendar 1012–1013
Bengali calendar 498
Berber calendar 2041
English Regnal year 4  Will. 2   5  Will. 2
Buddhist calendar 1635
Burmese calendar 453
Byzantine calendar 6599–6600
Chinese calendar 庚午(Metal  Horse)
3787 or 3727
     to 
辛未年 (Metal  Goat)
3788 or 3728
Coptic calendar 807–808
Discordian calendar 2257
Ethiopian calendar 1083–1084
Hebrew calendar 4851–4852
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1147–1148
 - Shaka Samvat 1012–1013
 - Kali Yuga 4191–4192
Holocene calendar 11091
Igbo calendar 91–92
Iranian calendar 469–470
Islamic calendar 483–484
Japanese calendar Kanji 5
(寛治5年)
Javanese calendar 995–996
Julian calendar 1091
MXCI
Korean calendar 3424
Minguo calendar 821 before ROC
民前821年
Nanakshahi calendar −377
Seleucid era 1402/1403 AG
Thai solar calendar 1633–1634
Tibetan calendar 阳金马年
(male Iron-Horse)
1217 or 836 or 64
     to 
阴金羊年
(female Iron-Goat)
1218 or 837 or 65
Roger I of Sicily (r. 1071-1101) Roger I of Sicily.jpg
Roger I of Sicily (r. 1071–1101)

Year 1091 ( MXCI ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

By place

Byzantine Empire

  • Spring Tzachas, an Seljuk Turkish military commander, establishes an independent maritime state centred in the Ionian coastal city of Smyrna (modern-day İzmir). He proclaims himself emperor ( basileus ) and concludes an alliance with the Pechenegs in Thrace. Tzachas uses his fleet to blockade Constantinople by sea, while the Pechenegs besiege the capital by land. [1]
  • April 29 Battle of Levounion: Emperor Alexios I supported by his allies defeats the Pechenegs 80,000 men (including women and children) at the Evros River near Enos (modern Turkey). The Cumans and Byzantine forces fall upon the enemy camp, slaughtering all in their path. The Pechenegs are butchered savagely that they are almost wiped out.

Europe

England

By topic

Disasters

Religion

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 1090s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1090, and ended on December 31, 1099.

1071 Year

Year 1071 (MLXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The 1100s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1100, and ended on December 31, 1109.

The 980s decade ran from January 1, 980, to December 31, 989.

The 990s decade ran from January 1, 990, to December 31, 999.

The 1050s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1050, and ended on December 31, 1059.

1078 Year

Year 1078 (MLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1095 Year

Year 1095 (MXCV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1101 Year

Year 1101 (MCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. It was the 2nd year of the 1100s decade, and the 1st year of the 12th century.

1097 Year

Year 1097 (MXCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1068 Year

Year 1068 (MLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1059 Year

Year 1059 (MLIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1096 Year

Year 1096 (MXCVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1069 Year

Year 1069 (MLXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1081 Year

Year 1081 (MLXXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1085 Year

Year 1085 (MLXXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1090 (MXC) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1094 Year

Year 1094 (MXCIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

942 Year

Year 942 (CMXLII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029.

References

  1. Brian Todd Carey (2012). Road to Manzikert: Byzantine and Islamic Warfare (527–1071), p. 160. ISBN   978-1-84884-215-1.
  2. Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 109. ISBN   2-7068-1398-9.