Athletics at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

Last updated

Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
De Grasse, Bolt, Vicaut Rio 2016.jpg
De Grasse, Bolt and Vicaut cross the finish line during the final of the Men's 100 metres
Venue Olympic Stadium
Dates13 August 2016
(Preliminary round & heats)
14 August 2016
(semi-final & final) [1]
Competitors84 from 57 nations
Winning time9.81
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Usain Bolt Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Silver medal icon.svg Justin Gatlin Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Bronze medal icon.svg Andre De Grasse Flag of Canada.svg  Canada
  2012
2020  
Official Video Highlights TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video Highlights

The men's 100 metres event at the 2016 Summer Olympics took place between 13–14 August at the Olympic Stadium. [1] Eighty-four athletes from 57 nations competed. [2]

Contents

Background

Billed as one of the most anticipated races in history, Usain Bolt of Jamaica entered as the world record holder, defending Olympic champion and the reigning World Champion. He sought to become the first man to win three Olympic 100 m titles, en route to the "Triple-Triple"; 100m, 200m and 4 × 100 metres relay Gold Medals at 3 Consecutive Olympic Games. However, with recurring injury problems affecting his early season, he was ranked 4th in the year with 9.88 seconds, and only raced 3 100m finals before pulling out of the Jamaican Trials; he only qualified for the Olympics through a medical exemption. Meanwhile, his biggest rival was Justin Gatlin of the United States, the world leader for 3 consecutive years who had threatened Bolt's world titles in 2013 and more prominently in 2015. Despite also having injuries in the early season, the 34-year old Gatlin also went unbeaten in the season, going on to win the American Trials in a world-leading 9.80 seconds.

Trayvon Bromell, joint-bronze medalist at the Beijing World Championships and the World Junior record holder, finished second to Gatlin at the American Trials with the second-fastest time of the year. Defending Silver Medallist and joint-second fastest man in history Yohan Blake, who won the Jamaican Trials in Bolt's absence, showed a strong return to form since his near-career ending injuries from 2013-2015. [3] [4] Nickel Ashmeade and Marvin Bracy filled out the Jamaican and American rosters. Meanwhile, France's Jimmy Vicaut, co-European record holder, equaled the 9.86 record once again, and Akani Simbine was the last man under 9.9 seconds that year, with a South African record of 9.89. Other contenders included the other bronze medalist in Beijing Andre De Grasse, 5th ranked Femi Ogunode who equaled his Asian record of 9.91, and the British trio of James Dasaolu, James Ellington, and Chijindu Ujah.

Macedonia and Palestine competed for the first time in the event. The United States made its 27th appearance in the event, the most of any country, having missed only the boycotted 1980 Games.

Summary

In the preliminary round, Hassan Saaid of the Maldives and Rodman Teltull of Palau were the fastest to progress, both managing under 10.6 seconds. [5] Siueni Filimone qualified but pulled a hamstring at the finish and was unable to compete in the next round.

Gatlin was the fastest in the heats at 10.01, with Bolt not too far behind at 10.07. Kemarley Brown, Zhenye Xie and Ben Youssef Meite were surprise heat winners, while Vicaut and Bracy amazingly only qualified on time. The most prominent casualties were Ogunode, Ellington, European champion Churandy Martina, sub-10 Canadian Aaron Brown, 2008 Silver Medalist Richard Thompson, and his teammate Keston Bledman. [6] [7]

Vicaut made up for his sluggish heat by winning the first semifinal in 9.95. In the second semifinal, Bolt silenced doubters by casually jogging 9.86 to win; Bolt had done the same in 9.87 and 9.85 at the previous two Olympic games, proving that he was in excellent shape. Andre De Grasse finished second in 9.92, equaling his personal best and boosting his status as a medal contender by tenfold. De Grasse also appeared to be mimicking Bolt, glancing at the field every time Bolt did. Gatlin won the last semifinal in an easy 9.94, then immediately left the arena to begin preparing for the final.

In the final, Gatlin's introduction prompted negative reception from the crowd, while Bolt's introduction filled the stadium with cheers once again. At the gun, Gatlin got the best start, slightly ahead of Simbine and Bromell to his inside. Two lanes outside, Bolt was behind and stayed level with De Grasse and Meite. By the middle of the race, Gatlin had 2 metres on Bolt and it seemed as though the Jamaican would be defeated. However, Bolt quickly hit top speed and surged ahead, catching the American at 75 meters and pulling away at 80. Usain thumped his chest as he crossed the line in first, making history as the first man in history to win 3 consecutive Olympic golds in the 100m. Gatlin was forced to settle for the silver and was nearly caught by De Grasse, who pipped Blake and Simbine for the Bronze medal.

Usain Bolt's win broke 2 records; becoming the first person to win the 100 meter race 3 times and also to medal 3 times in the 100 meter race. Previously, only Carl Lewis had won two gold medals in the 100m, a feat which Bolt had matched at the London 2012 Summer Olympics. However, finishing several hundredths of a second later, Gatlin, also having a place on the podium, joined him in winning three 100m medals; one gold, one silver (for this race), and one bronze, which itself made Gatlin the first man in history to win each medal in the 100 meters. [8] Gatlin also became the holder of the record for the longest time between their first medal and last medal in the 100m, in terms of years. His first being his gold won at the 2004 Summer Olympics and his silver medal, 12 years later in this race.

Bolt's winning time of 9.81 seconds was his slowest at the Olympics, but a season's best and the second fastest of the year behind Gatlin. De Grasse' 9.91 was a new personal best, and Meite set a new national record of 9.96 for 6th. The final was significantly slower than London and slightly slower than Beijing, but was still one of the fastest in Olympic history. The race was strikingly similar to Beijing in 2008; the 2nd to 6th athletes finished very closely, with 2nd, 3rd and 4th being won in 9.89, 9.91 and 9.93 respectively, while 7th and 8th finished further behind the field and had a difference of 0.02 between them.

The following evening the medals were presented by Valeriy Borzov, IOC member, Ukraine and Sebastian Coe, President of the IAAF.

Qualification

A National Olympic Committee (NOC) could enter up to 3 qualified athletes in the men's 100 metres event if all athletes meet the entry standard during the qualifying period. (The limit of 3 has been in place since the 1930 Olympic Congress.) The qualifying standard was 10.16 seconds. The qualifying period was from 1 May 2015 to 11 July 2016. The qualifying time standards could be obtained in various meets during the given period that have the approval of the IAAF. Only outdoor meets were eligible for the sprints and short hurdles, including the 100 metres. NOCs could also use their universality place—each NOC could enter one male athlete regardless of time if they had no male athletes meeting the entry standard for an athletics event—in the 100 metres. [9] [10]

Competition format

The event continued to use the preliminaries plus three main rounds format introduced in 2012. Athletes not meeting the qualification standard competed in the preliminaries; those who met the standard started in the first round.

The preliminary round consisted of 3 heats, each with 7 or 8 athletes. The top two runners in each heat advanced, along with the next two fastest runners overall. They joined the faster entrants in the first round of heats, which consisted of 8 heats of 8 or 9 athletes each. The top two runners in each heat, along with the next eight fastest runners overall, moved on to the semifinals. The 24 semifinalists competed in three heats of 8, with the top two in each semifinal and the next two overall advancing to the eight-man final. [2]

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World recordFlag of Jamaica.svg  Usain Bolt  (JAM)9.58 Berlin, Germany 16 August 2009
Olympic recordFlag of Jamaica.svg  Usain Bolt  (JAM)9.63 London, United Kingdom 5 August 2012
Area
Time (s)WindAthleteNation
Africa ( records )9.85+1.7 Olusoji Fasuba Flag of Nigeria.svg Nigeria
Asia ( records )9.91+1.8 Femi Ogunode Flag of Qatar.svg Qatar
9.91+0.6
Europe ( records )9.86+0.6 Francis Obikwelu Flag of Portugal.svg Portugal
9.86+1.3 Jimmy Vicaut Flag of France.svg France
9.86+1.8
North, Central America
and Caribbean
( records )
9.58 WR +0.9 Usain Bolt Flag of Jamaica.svg Jamaica
Oceania ( records )9.93+1.8 Patrick Johnson Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
South America ( records )10.00 [A] +1.6 Robson da Silva Flag of Brazil.svg Brazil

The following national records were established during the competition:

CountryAthleteRoundTimeNotes
Ivory Coast Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ben Youssef Meïté  (CIV)Semifinals9.97 s
Ivory Coast Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ben Youssef Meïté  (CIV)Final9.96 s

Schedule

All times are Brasilia Time (UTC-3)

DateTimeRound
Saturday, 13 August 201609:30
12:00
Preliminaries
Round 1
Sunday, 14 August 201621:00
22:25
Semifinals
Final

Results

Preliminaries

The preliminary round featured athletes invited to compete who had not achieved the required qualifying standard. Athletes who had achieved the standard received a bye into the first round proper. Qualification rules: First 2 in each heat (Q) and the next 2 fastest (q) advance to Round 1.

Heat 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
19 Riste Pandev Flag of Macedonia.svg  Macedonia 0.14510.72 Q, SB
28 Sudirman Hadi Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 0.13610.77 Q
34 Mohammed Abukhousa Flag of Palestine.svg  Palestine 0.17610.82 q
45 Holder da Silva Flag of Guinea-Bissau.svg  Guinea-Bissau 0.16510.97
56 Wilfried Bingangoye Flag of Gabon.svg  Gabon 0.14511.03
62 Mohamed Lamine Dansoko Flag of Guinea.svg  Guinea 0.14511.05
77 Abdul Wahab Zahiri Flag of Afghanistan.svg  Afghanistan 0.17011.56
83 Richson Simeon Flag of the Marshall Islands.svg  Marshall Islands 0.13611.81 SB
Wind: −0.2 m/s

Heat 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
12 Hassan Saaid Flag of Maldives.svg  Maldives 0.13010.43 Q
26 Siueni Filimone Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 0.15510.76 Q, SB
37 Luke Bezzina Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 0.16711.04
45 Masbah Ahmmed Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 0.13711.34
54 Isaac Silafau Flag of American Samoa.svg  American Samoa 0.14111.51
68 John Ruuka Flag of Kiribati.svg  Kiribati 0.17811.65
73 Hermenegildo Leite Flag of Angola.svg  Angola 0.14511.65
Wind: +0.4 m/s

Heat 3

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
17 Rodman Teltull Flag of Palau.svg  Palau 0.13510.53 Q
26 Jin Wei Timothee Yap Flag of Singapore.svg  Singapore 0.14010.84 Q
33 Mohamed Fakhri Ismail Flag of Brunei.svg  Brunei 0.16310.92 q
44 Ishmail Kamara Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sierra Leone 0.14610.95
55 Kitson Kapiriel Flag of the Federated States of Micronesia.svg  Federated States of Micronesia 0.15911.42
62 Jidou El Moctar Flag of Mauritania (1959-2017).svg  Mauritania 0.15711.44
78 Etimoni Timuani Flag of Tuvalu.svg  Tuvalu 0.14311.81
Wind: −0.3 m/s

Round 1

Qualification rules: First 2 in each heat (Q) and the next 8 fastest (q) advance to the Semifinals.

Heat 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Kemarley Brown Flag of Bahrain.svg  Bahrain 0.14610.13 Q
25 Chijindu Ujah Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.15010.13 Q
37 Marvin Bracy Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.15510.16 q
42 Seye Ogunlewe Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.13910.26
51 Femi Ogunode Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 0.17010.28
68 Sean Safo-Antwi Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.14510.43
79 Reza Ghasemi Flag of Iran.svg  Iran 0.15010.47
86 Adrian Griffith Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 0.14310.53
94 Mohamed Fakhri Ismail Flag of Brunei.svg  Brunei 0.15110.95
Wind: −1.2 m/s

Heat 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
18 Justin Gatlin Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.16010.01 Q
27 Daniel Bailey Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 0.15310.20 Q
31 Rondel Sorrillo Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.11210.23
45 Gerald Phiri Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 0.14610.27
59 Lucas Jakubczyk Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0.16610.29
66 Ogho-Oghene Egwero Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.15110.37
73 Wilfried Koffi Hua Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0.16610.37
82 Rodman Teltull Flag of Palau.svg  Palau 0.13310.64
94 Riste Pandev Flag of Macedonia.svg  Macedonia 0.16310.71 SB
Wind: +0.8 m/s

Heat 3

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
15 Xie Zhenye Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 0.14310.08 Q, PB
23 Nickel Ashmeade Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.13210.13 Q
36 Hassan Taftian Flag of Iran.svg  Iran 0.15010.17 q
42 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.15110.18 q
54 Abdullah Abkar Mohammed Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 0.15410.26
67 Aziz Ouhadi Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 0.15810.34
79 Kemar Hyman Flag of the Cayman Islands.svg  Cayman Islands 0.16010.34
88 Darrell Wesh Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti 0.13810.39
Wind: −0.1 m/s

Heat 4

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Andre De Grasse Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.14810.04 Q
29 Asuka Cambridge Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.13710.13 Q
32 Su Bingtian Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 0.14610.17 q
41 Jimmy Vicaut Flag of France.svg  France 0.16410.19 q
57 Churandy Martina Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 0.14210.22
65 Emmanuel Matadi Flag of Liberia.svg  Liberia 0.14610.31
78 Julian Reus Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0.13510.34
86 Jamial Rolle Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 0.14510.68
94 Sudirman Hadi Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 0.12210.70
Wind: −0.5 m/s

Heat 5

Heat 5 finish Greene, Mvumvure, Bromell, Lemaitre Rio 2016.jpg
Heat 5 finish
RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
19 Ben Youssef Meïté Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0.14510.03 Q
25 Trayvon Bromell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.16510.13 Q
34 Christophe Lemaitre Flag of France.svg  France 0.15010.16 q
47 Cejhae Greene Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 0.15610.20 q
58 Keston Bledman Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.15010.20
61 Akeem Haynes Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.12310.22
76 Gabriel Mvumvure Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 0.13110.28
82 Hassan Saaid Flag of Maldives.svg  Maldives 0.13510.47
3 Siueni Filimone Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga N/A DNS
Wind: +0.2 m/s

Heat 6

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Yohan Blake Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.15410.11 Q
28 Jak Ali Harvey Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 0.15910.14 Q
39 Barakat Alharthi Flag of Oman.svg  Oman 0.15510.22
42 Mosito Lehata Flag of Lesotho.svg  Lesotho 0.15110.25
56 James Ellington Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.14510.29
63 Henricho Bruintjies Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 0.10710.33
75 Zhang Peimeng Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 0.12110.36
87 Antoine Adams Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.14910.39
Wind: −0.8 m/s

Heat 7

Heat 7 finish Best, Dasaolu, Bolt Rio 2016.jpg
Heat 7 finish
RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Usain Bolt Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.15610.07 Q
23 Andrew Fisher Flag of Bahrain.svg  Bahrain 0.13410.12 Q
37 James Dasaolu Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.17110.18 q
49 Yoshihide Kiryu Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.15010.23
52 Shavez Hart Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 0.13910.28 SB
65 Richard Thompson Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.13010.29
78 Jahvid Best Flag of Saint Lucia.svg  Saint Lucia 0.14710.39
81 Jurgen Themen Flag of Suriname.svg  Suriname 0.13910.47
94 Jin Wei Timothee Yap Flag of Singapore.svg  Singapore 0.14910.79
Wind: −0.4 m/s

Heat 8

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Akani Simbine Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 0.12410.14 Q
21 Ryota Yamagata Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.11110.20 Q
37 Aaron Brown Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.13510.24
49 Ramon Gittens Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.16210.25
52 Solomon Bockarie Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 0.12710.36
5 Vitor Hugo dos Santos Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.157
76 Kim Kuk-young Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 0.13510.37
83 Brijesh Lawrence Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.16310.55
98 Mohammed Abukhousa Flag of Palestine.svg  Palestine 0.15311.89
Wind: −1.3 m/s

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Jimmy Vicaut Flag of France.svg  France 0.1319.95 Q
27 Ben Youssef Meïté Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0.1429.97 Q, NR
35 Akani Simbine Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 0.1449.98 q
49 Jak Ali Harvey Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 0.14810.03
54 Nickel Ashmeade Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.11810.05
68 Marvin Bracy Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.15210.08
76 Xie Zhenye Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 0.13410.11
82 Hassan Taftian Flag of Iran.svg  Iran 0.13610.23
Wind: +0.2 m/s

Semifinal 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Usain Bolt Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1439.86 Q, SB
25 Andre De Grasse Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.1309.92 Q, PB
39 Trayvon Bromell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.12810.01 q
47 Chijindu Ujah Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.16010.01
58 Ryota Yamagata Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.10910.05 PB
63 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.13810.12
72 Cejhae Greene Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 0.14310.13
4 Andrew Fisher Flag of Bahrain.svg  Bahrain N/A DQ R162.7
Wind: +0.2 m/s

Semifinal 3

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Justin Gatlin Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1519.94 Q
24 Yohan Blake Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.14710.01 Q
39 Christophe Lemaitre Flag of France.svg  France 0.12210.07 SB
43 Su Bingtian Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 0.14010.08 SB
55 Kemarley Brown Flag of Bahrain.svg  Bahrain 0.15210.13
62 James Dasaolu Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.14510.16
77 Asuka Cambridge Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.13510.17
8 Daniel Bailey Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda N/A DNS
Wind: 0.0 m/s

Final

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg6 Usain Bolt Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1559.81 SB
Silver medal icon.svg4 Justin Gatlin Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1529.89
Bronze medal icon.svg7 Andre De Grasse Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.1419.91 PB
49 Yohan Blake Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1459.93 SB
53 Akani Simbine Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 0.1289.94
68 Ben Youssef Meïté Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0.1569.96 NR
75 Jimmy Vicaut Flag of France.svg  France 0.14010.04
82 Trayvon Bromell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.13510.06
Wind: +0.2 m/s

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Andre De Grasse Canadian sprinter

Andre De Grasse is a Canadian sprinter. He won the silver medal in the 200 m and bronze medals in both the 100 m and 4×100 m relay at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. De Grasse was the Pan American champion and the NCAA champion in the 100 m and 200 m. De Grasse won the bronze in the 100 m and the 4 × 100 m relay at the 2015 World Athletics Championships in Beijing. He also won the bronze in the 100 m and the silver in the 200 m at the 2019 World Athletics Championships in Doha. He is the current Canadian record holder in the 200m.

2015 World Championships in Athletics – Mens 100 metres

The men's 100 metres at the 2015 World Championships in Athletics was held at the Beijing National Stadium on 22 and 23 August.

2017 World Championships in Athletics – Mens 100 metres

The men's 100 metres at the 2017 World Championships in Athletics was held at the London Olympic Stadium on 4−5 August. This meet was announced as the last competition for Usain Bolt. The race was won by Justin Gatlin of the United States, ahead of Gatlin's team-mate Christian Coleman, with Usain Bolt finishing third.

References

  1. 1 2 "Men's 100m". Rio 2016 Organisation. Archived from the original on 22 August 2016. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  2. 1 2 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  3. Landells, Steve (10 August 2016). Preview: men's 100m – Rio 2016 Olympic Games. IAAF. Retrieved on 13 August 2016.
  4. senior outdoor 2016 100 Metres men. IAAF. Retrieved on 13 August 2016.
  5. Preliminary Round 100 Metres men The XXXI Olympic Games. IAAF. Retrieved on 13 August 2016.
  6. Report: men's 100m heats – Rio 2016 Olympic Games . IAAF. Retrieved on 13 August 2016.
  7. "Usain Bolt wins third straight 100m Olympic final – as it happened". Guardian. 15 August 2016. Retrieved 16 August 2016.
  8. "Rio Olympics 2016: Usain Bolt wins 100m gold, Justin Gatlin second". BBC Sport. 14 August 2016. Retrieved 16 August 2016.
  9. "IAAF approves entry standards for Rio 2016 Olympic Games". Athletics Weekly . Retrieved 16 April 2015.
  10. "Qualification System – Games of the XXXI Olympiad – Athletics". IAAF . Retrieved 15 July 2016.

Rio Replay: Men's 100m Final on YouTube