Headquarters Marine Corps

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Headquarters Marine Corps
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Agency overview
Headquarters The Pentagon
Agency executive
Parent agency Department of the Navy
Website Headquarters Marine Corps website

Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC) is a headquarters staff within the Department of the Navy which includes the offices of the Commandant of the Marine Corps, the Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps and various staff functions. The function, composition, and general duties of HQMC are defined in Title 10 of the United States Code, Subtitle C, Part I, Chapter 506 (Headquarters, Marine Corps). [1]

Contents

HQMC "consists of the Commandant of the Marine Corps and those staff agencies that advise and assist him in discharging his responsibilities prescribed by law and higher authority. The Commandant is directly responsible to the Secretary of the Navy for the total performance of the Marine Corps. This includes the administration, discipline, internal organization, training, requirements, efficiency, and readiness of the service. The Commandant also is responsible for the operation of the Marine Corps material support system." [2]

HQMC is currently spread throughout the Washington, D.C., Virginia, and Maryland area, to include the Pentagon, Henderson Hall, Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C., Marine Corps Base Quantico, and the Washington Navy Yard.

Agencies

Organization of HQMC, 2006. Marine Corps structure.svg
Organization of HQMC, 2006.

See also

Notes

  1. "Laws: Cases and Codes : U.S. Code : TITLE 10. ARMED FORCES". Find Law. Retrieved 2007-02-25.
  2. "Appendix A: How the Marines Are Organized". Marine Corps Concepts and Programs 2006. United States Marine Corps. p. 252. Archived from the original on 2009-02-02. Retrieved 2007-05-06.
  3. "U.S. Marine Corps: Concepts & Programs 2013: America's Expeditionary Force in Readiness" (pdf). United States Marine Corps. 2013.

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References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from websites or documents ofthe United States Marine Corps .