New Year's Six

Last updated
New Year's Six
In operation 2014–present
Preceded by BCS (19982013)
Bowl Alliance (19951997)
Bowl Coalition (19921994)
Number of New Year's Six games7 (championship game, 6 bowl games)
Television partner(s) ESPN (2014–present)
Most New Year's Six appearances Alabama, Ohio State, Clemson (5)
Most New Year's Six winsAlabama (6)
Conference with most appearances SEC, Big Ten (14)
Conference with most game winsSEC (10)
Executive directorBill Hancock

The New Year's Six (NY6) bowls are the top six major NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision bowl games: the Rose Bowl, Sugar Bowl, Orange Bowl, Cotton Bowl, Peach Bowl, and Fiesta Bowl. The New Year's Six represent six of the ten oldest bowl games currently played at the FBS level. These six top-tier bowl games rotate the hosting of the two College Football Playoff (CFP) semifinal games, which determine the teams that play in the final College Football Playoff National Championship game. [1] The rotation is set on a three-year cycle with the following pairings: Rose/Sugar, Orange/Cotton, and Fiesta/Peach.

Contents

Using the final CFP rankings, the selection committee seeds and pairs the top four teams and determines the participants for the other four non-playoff New Year's Six bowls that are not hosting the semifinals that year. These four non-playoff bowls are also referred to as the Selection Committee bowl games. These six games focus on the top 12 teams in the rankings; to date during the College Football Playoff era (2014 through 2018 seasons), of the 60 teams to play in a New Year's Six game, only six have been ranked lower than 12th.

So, in all, twelve schools are selected for these major, top tier bowls. These are required to include the champions of the "Power Five" conferences (ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12, and SEC). In addition, the highest-ranked champion from the "Group of Five" conferences (The American, Conference USA, MAC, Mountain West, and Sun Belt) is guaranteed a berth if the group's top team is not in the playoff. [2]

History leading to the creation of the CFP

The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) was a selection system that created five bowl game match-ups involving ten of the top ranked teams in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of college football, including an opportunity for the top two teams to compete in the BCS National Championship Game. The system was in place for the 1998 through 2013 seasons and in 2014 was replaced by the College Football Playoff. The four-team playoffs consist of two semifinal games, with the winners advancing to the College Football Playoff National Championship. If New Year's Day falls on a Sunday, those games traditionally on New Year's Day will be played the next day on January 2 in deference to the National Football League's Week 17, which marks the end of the NFL regular season.

In June 2012, the BCS conference presidents approved the College Football Playoff to replace the Bowl Championship Series. [2] Three bowls, Rose, Sugar and Orange bowls, due to their contracts with power conferences were part of the rotating semi-playoff games with three more bowls to be named. [1] With issues about fairness and the Big East's BCS Automatic Qualifier conference status, talk of accommodating the Group of Seven leagues with a seventh participating bowl started up. On November 12, 2012 in Denver, the conference commissioners granted the top Group of Seven conference champion a guaranteed slot in one of the six premier bowls. [2] In July 2013, Cotton Bowl Classic, Fiesta Bowl and the Chick-fil-A Bowl were selected as the other three rotating semi-playoff bowls ahead of the Holiday Bowl. Also, the BCS conference commissioners meetings selected Cowboys Stadium as the first host of the College Football Playoff Championship Game on January 12, 2015. [1]

Bowl game conference tie-ins

Three of the bowls have tie-ins with the specified conference champions in the years they are not hosting playoff semifinals:

When the conference champion is unavailable, the bowls invite the next-best team from that conference. The Cotton, [1] Fiesta [3] and Peach Bowls have no conference tie-ins; [3] as such, the best conference champion from the Group of Five ends up in one of those bowls if it doesn't end up in a playoff semifinal. [2]

History and schedule

Games are listed in chronological order, with final CFP rankings, and win-loss records prior to the respective bowl being played.

2014 season

DayDateBowlCityWinning teamLosing team
WednesdayDecember 31, 2014 Peach Bowl Atlanta, GANo. 6 TCU (11–1)42No. 9 Ole Miss (9–3)3
WednesdayDecember 31, 2014 Fiesta Bowl Glendale, AZNo. 20 Boise State (11–2)38No. 10 Arizona (10–3)30
WednesdayDecember 31, 2014 Orange Bowl Miami Gardens, FLNo. 12 Georgia Tech (10–3)49No. 7 Mississippi State (10–2)34
ThursdayJanuary 1, 2015 Cotton Bowl Classic Arlington, TXNo. 8 Michigan State (10–2)42No. 5 Baylor (11–1)41
ThursdayJanuary 1, 2015(CFP Semifinal) Rose Bowl Pasadena, CANo. 2 Oregon (12–1)59No. 3 Florida State (13–0)20
ThursdayJanuary 1, 2015(CFP Semifinal) Sugar Bowl New Orleans, LANo. 4 Ohio State (12–1)42No. 1 Alabama (12–1)35
MondayJanuary 12, 2015 National Championship Game Arlington, TXNo. 4 Ohio State (13–1)42No. 2 Oregon (13–1)20

2015 season

DayDateBowlCityWinning teamLosing team
ThursdayDecember 31, 2015 Peach Bowl Atlanta, GANo. 18 Houston (12–1)38No. 9 Florida State (10–2)24
ThursdayDecember 31, 2015(CFP Semifinal) Orange Bowl Miami Gardens, FLNo. 1 Clemson (13–0)37No. 4 Oklahoma (11–1)17
ThursdayDecember 31, 2015(CFP Semifinal) Cotton Bowl Classic Arlington, TXNo. 2 Alabama (12–1)38No. 3 Michigan State (12–1)0
FridayJanuary 1, 2016 Fiesta Bowl Glendale, AZNo. 7 Ohio State (11–1)44No. 8 Notre Dame (10–2)28
FridayJanuary 1, 2016 Rose Bowl Pasadena, CANo. 6 Stanford (11–2)45No. 5 Iowa (12–1)16
FridayJanuary 1, 2016 Sugar Bowl New Orleans, LANo. 12 Ole Miss (9–3)48No. 16 Oklahoma State (10–2)20
MondayJanuary 11, 2016 National Championship Game Glendale, AZNo. 2 Alabama (13–1)45No. 1 Clemson (14–0)40

2016 season

DayDateBowlCityWinning teamLosing team
FridayDecember 30, 2016 Orange Bowl Miami Gardens, FLNo. 11 Florida State (9–3)33No. 6 Michigan (10–2)32
SaturdayDecember 31, 2016(CFP Semifinal) Peach Bowl Atlanta, GANo. 1 Alabama (13–0)24No. 4 Washington (12–1)7
SaturdayDecember 31, 2016(CFP Semifinal) Fiesta Bowl Glendale, AZNo. 2 Clemson (12–1)31No. 3 Ohio State (11–1)0
MondayJanuary 2, 2017 Cotton Bowl Classic Arlington, TXNo. 8 Wisconsin (10–3)24No. 15 Western Michigan (13–0)16
MondayJanuary 2, 2017 Rose Bowl Pasadena, CANo. 9 USC (9–3)52No. 5 Penn State (11–2)49
MondayJanuary 2, 2017 Sugar Bowl New Orleans, LANo. 7 Oklahoma (10–2)35No. 14 Auburn (8–4)19
MondayJanuary 9, 2017 National Championship Game Tampa, FLNo. 2 Clemson (13–1)35No. 1 Alabama (14–0)31

2017 season

DayDateBowlCityWinning teamLosing team
FridayDecember 29, 2017 Cotton Bowl Classic Arlington, TXNo. 5 Ohio State (11–2)24No. 8 USC (11–2)7
SaturdayDecember 30, 2017 Fiesta Bowl Glendale, AZNo. 9 Penn State (10–2)35No. 11 Washington (10–2)28
SaturdayDecember 30, 2017 Orange Bowl Miami Gardens, FLNo. 6 Wisconsin (12–1)34No. 10 Miami (FL) (10–2)24
MondayJanuary 1, 2018 Peach Bowl Atlanta, GANo. 12 UCF (12–0)34No. 7 Auburn (10–3)27
MondayJanuary 1, 2018(CFP Semifinal) Rose Bowl Pasadena, CANo. 3 Georgia (12–1)54No. 2 Oklahoma (12–1)482OT
MondayJanuary 1, 2018(CFP Semifinal) Sugar Bowl New Orleans, LANo. 4 Alabama (11–1)24No. 1 Clemson (12–1)6
MondayJanuary 8, 2018 National Championship Game Atlanta, GANo. 4 Alabama (12–1)26No. 3 Georgia (13–1)23OT

2018 season

DayDateBowlCityWinning teamLosing team
SaturdayDecember 29, 2018 Peach Bowl Atlanta, GANo. 10 Florida (9–3)41No. 7 Michigan (10–2)15
SaturdayDecember 29, 2018(CFP Semifinal) Cotton Bowl Classic Arlington, TXNo. 2 Clemson (13–0)30No. 3 Notre Dame (12–0)3
SaturdayDecember 29, 2018(CFP Semifinal) Orange Bowl Miami Gardens, FLNo. 1 Alabama (13–0)45No. 4 Oklahoma (12–1)34
TuesdayJanuary 1, 2019 Fiesta Bowl Glendale, AZNo. 11 LSU (9–3)40No. 8 UCF (12–0)32
TuesdayJanuary 1, 2019 Rose Bowl Pasadena, CANo. 6 Ohio State (12–1)28No. 9 Washington (10–3)23
TuesdayJanuary 1, 2019 Sugar Bowl New Orleans, LANo. 15 Texas (9–4)28No. 5 Georgia (11–2)21
MondayJanuary 7, 2019 National Championship Game Santa Clara, CANo. 2 Clemson (14–0)44No. 1 Alabama (14–0)16

2019 season

DayDateBowlCityHome teamAway team
SaturdayDecember 28, 2019 Cotton Bowl Classic Arlington, TXNo. 10 Penn State (10–2)No. 17 Memphis (12–1)
SaturdayDecember 28, 2019(CFP Semifinal) Peach Bowl Atlanta, GANo. 1 LSU (13–0)No. 4 Oklahoma (12–1)
SaturdayDecember 28, 2019(CFP Semifinal) Fiesta Bowl Glendale, AZNo. 2 Ohio State (13–0)No. 3 Clemson (13–0)
MondayDecember 30, 2019 Orange Bowl Miami Gardens, FLNo. 9 Florida (10–2)No. 24 Virginia (9–4)
WednesdayJanuary 1, 2020 Rose Bowl Pasadena, CANo. 6 Oregon (11–2)No. 8 Wisconsin (10–3)
WednesdayJanuary 1, 2020 Sugar Bowl New Orleans, LANo. 5 Georgia (11–2)No. 7 Baylor (11–2)
MondayJanuary 13, 2020 National Championship Game New Orleans, LA 

Source: [5] [6]

Future games

Season (bowl games) Cotton Orange Fiesta Peach Rose Sugar Championship (site)
2020 (2020–21)December 30January 2January 2January 1January 1Dagger-14-plain.pngJanuary 1Dagger-14-plain.pngJanuary 11 (Miami Gardens, FL)
2021 (2021–22)December 31Dagger-14-plain.pngDecember 31Dagger-14-plain.pngJanuary 1December 30January 1January 1January 10 (Indianapolis, IN)
2022 (2022–23)January 2December 30December 31Dagger-14-plain.pngDecember 31Dagger-14-plain.pngJanuary 2January 2January 9 (Los Angeles, CA)
2023 (2023–24)January 1December 30December 30December 29January 1Dagger-14-plain.pngJanuary 1Dagger-14-plain.pngJanuary 8 (Houston, TX)
2024 (2024–25)December 28Dagger-14-plain.pngDecember 28Dagger-14-plain.pngDecember 30December 28January 1January 1January 6 (TBD)
2025 (2025–26)December 27December 30December 27Dagger-14-plain.pngDecember 27Dagger-14-plain.pngJanuary 1January 1January 5 (TBD)

Dagger-14-plain.png Denotes CFP semifinal games
Source: [7]

New Year's Six bowl appearances

New Year's Six bowl appearances by team

AppearancesGamesSchoolWLPctGames
59[[Alabama Crimson Tide football|Alabama]]63.667Lost 2015 Sugar Bowl+
Won 2015 Cotton Bowl+ (December 2015)
Won 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2016 Peach Bowl+
Lost 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2018 Sugar Bowl+
Won 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2018 Orange Bowl+
Lost 2019 College Football Playoff National Championship
56[[Ohio State Buckeyes football|Ohio State]]51.833Won 2015 Sugar Bowl+
Won 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2016 Fiesta Bowl (January 2016)
Lost 2016 Fiesta Bowl+ (December 2016)
Won 2017 Cotton Bowl (December 2017)
Won 2019 Rose Bowl
47[[Clemson Tigers football|Clemson]]52.714Won 2015 Orange Bowl+
Lost 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2016 Fiesta Bowl+ (December 2016)
Won 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship
Lost 2018 Sugar Bowl+
Won 2018 Cotton Bowl+
Won 2019 College Football Playoff National Championship
44[[Oklahoma Sooners football|Oklahoma]]13.250Lost 2015 Orange Bowl+
Won 2017 Sugar Bowl
Lost 2018 Rose Bowl+
Lost 2018 Orange Bowl+
33[[Florida State Seminoles football|Florida State]]12.333Lost 2015 Rose Bowl+
Lost 2015 Peach Bowl
Won 2016 Orange Bowl
33[[Washington Huskies football|Washington]]03.000Lost 2016 Peach Bowl+
Lost 2017 Fiesta Bowl
Lost 2019 Rose Bowl
23[[Georgia Bulldogs football|Georgia]]12.333Won 2018 Rose Bowl+
Lost 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship
Lost 2019 Sugar Bowl
22[[Wisconsin Badgers football|Wisconsin]]201.000Won 2017 Cotton Bowl (January 2017)
Won 2017 Orange Bowl
22[[Michigan State Spartans football|Michigan State]]11.500Won 2015 Cotton Bowl (January 2015)
Lost 2015 Cotton Bowl+ (December 2015)
22[[Ole Miss Rebels football|Ole Miss]]11.500Lost 2014 Peach Bowl
Won 2016 Sugar Bowl
22[[USC Trojans football|USC]]11.500Won 2017 Rose Bowl
Lost 2017 Cotton Bowl (December 2017)
22[[Penn State Nittany Lions football|Penn State]]11.500Lost 2017 Rose Bowl
Won 2017 Fiesta Bowl
22[[UCF Knights football|UCF]]11.500Won 2018 Peach Bowl (January 2018)
Lost 2019 Fiesta Bowl
22[[Auburn Tigers football|Auburn]]02.000Lost 2017 Sugar Bowl
Lost 2018 Peach Bowl (January 2018)
22[[Michigan Wolverines football|Michigan]]02.000Lost 2016 Orange Bowl
Lost 2018 Peach Bowl (December 2018)
22[[Notre Dame Fighting Irish football|Notre Dame]]02.000Lost 2016 Fiesta Bowl (January 2016)
Lost 2018 Cotton Bowl+
12[[Oregon Ducks football|Oregon]]11.500Won 2015 Rose Bowl+
Lost 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship
11[[TCU Horned Frogs football|TCU]]101.000Won 2014 Peach Bowl
11[[Boise State Broncos football|Boise State]]101.000Won 2014 Fiesta Bowl
11[[Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football|Georgia Tech]]101.000Won 2014 Orange Bowl
11[[Houston Cougars football|Houston]]101.000Won 2015 Peach Bowl
11[[Stanford Cardinal football|Stanford]]101.000Won 2016 Rose Bowl
21[[Florida Gators football|Florida]]101.000Won 2018 Peach Bowl (December 2018)
11[[LSU Tigers football|LSU]]101.000Won 2019 Fiesta Bowl
11[[Texas Longhorns football|Texas]]101.000Won 2019 Sugar Bowl
11[[Miami Hurricanes football|Miami]]01.000Lost 2017 Orange Bowl
11[[Arizona Wildcats football|Arizona]]01.000Lost 2014 Fiesta Bowl
11[[Mississippi State Bulldogs football|Mississippi State]]01.000Lost 2014 Orange Bowl
11[[Baylor Bears football|Baylor]]01.000Lost 2015 Cotton Bowl (January 2015)
11[[Iowa Hawkeyes football|Iowa]]01.000Lost 2016 Rose Bowl
11[[Oklahoma State Cowboys football|Oklahoma State]]01.000Lost 2016 Sugar Bowl
11[[Western Michigan Broncos football|Western Michigan]]01.000Lost 2017 Cotton Bowl (January 2017)

+ Denotes CFP Semifinal

New Year's Six bowl appearances by conference

ConferenceAppearancesGamesWLPct# SchoolsSchool(s)
SEC 1419109.5267Alabama 5 (6–3)
Georgia 2 (1–2)
Ole Miss 2 (1–1)
Auburn 2 (0–2)
Florida 1 (1–0)
LSU 1 (1–0)
Mississippi State 1 (0–1)
Big Ten 141596.6006Ohio State 5 (5–1)
Wisconsin 2 (2–0)
Michigan State 2 (1–1)
Penn State 2 (1–1)
Michigan 2 (0–2)
Iowa 1 (0–1)
ACC 91275.5834Clemson 4 (5–2)
Florida State 3 (1–2)
Georgia Tech 1 (1–0)
Miami (FL) 1 (0–1)
Pac-12 8936.3335Washington 3 (0–3)
USC 2 (1–1)
Oregon 1 (1–1)
Stanford 1 (1–0)
Arizona 1 (0–1)
Big 12 8835.3755Oklahoma 4 (1–3)
TCU 1 (1–0)
Texas 1 (1–0)
Baylor 1 (0–1)
Oklahoma State 1 (0–1)
The American 3321.6672UCF 2 (1–1)
Houston 1 (1–0)
Independent 2202.0001Notre Dame 2 (0–2)
Mountain West 11101.0001Boise State 1 (1–0)
MAC 1101.0001Western Michigan 1 (0–1)

Conference USA and Sun Belt Conference have never appeared in the New Year's Six.

College Football Playoff appearances

College Football Playoff appearances by team

AppearancesGamesSchoolWLPctGames
59[[Alabama Crimson Tide football|Alabama]]63.667Lost 2015 Sugar Bowl
Won 2015 Cotton Bowl (December 2015)
Won 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2016 Peach Bowl
Lost 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2018 Sugar Bowl
Won 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2018 Orange Bowl
Lost 2019 College Football Playoff National Championship
47[[Clemson Tigers football|Clemson]]52.714Won 2015 Orange Bowl
Lost 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2016 Fiesta Bowl (December 2016)
Won 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship
Lost 2018 Sugar Bowl
Won 2018 Cotton Bowl
Won 2019 College Football Playoff National Championship
33[[Oklahoma Sooners football|Oklahoma]]03.000Lost 2015 Orange Bowl
Lost 2018 Rose Bowl
Lost 2018 Orange Bowl
23[[Ohio State Buckeyes football|Ohio State]]21.667Won 2015 Sugar Bowl
Won 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship
Lost 2016 Fiesta Bowl (December 2016)
12[[Oregon Ducks football|Oregon]]11.500Won 2015 Rose Bowl
Lost 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship
12[[Georgia Bulldogs football|Georgia]]11.500Won 2018 Rose Bowl
Lost 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship
11[[Florida State Seminoles football|Florida State]]01.000Lost 2015 Rose Bowl
11[[Michigan State Spartans football|Michigan State]]01.000Lost 2015 Cotton Bowl (December 2015)
11[[Washington Huskies football|Washington]]01.000Lost 2016 Peach Bowl
11[[Notre Dame Fighting Irish football|Notre Dame]]01.000Lost 2018 Cotton Bowl

College Football Playoff appearances by conference

ConferenceAppearancesGamesWLPct# SchoolsSchool(s)
SEC 61174.6362Alabama 5 (6–3)
Georgia 1 (1–1)
ACC 5853.6252Clemson 4 (5–2)
Florida State 1 (0–1)
Big Ten 3422.5002Ohio State 2 (2–1)
Michigan State 1 (0–1)
Big 12 3303.0001Oklahoma 3 (0–3)
Pac-12 2312.3332Oregon 1 (1–1)
Washington 1 (0–1)
Independent 1101.0001Notre Dame 1 (0–1)

College Football Playoff National Championship appearances

College Football Playoff National Championship appearances by team

AppearancesSchoolWLPctGamesTitle Season(s)
4[[Alabama Crimson Tide football|Alabama]]22.500Won 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship
Lost 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship
Lost 2019 College Football Playoff National Championship
2015, 2017
3[[Clemson Tigers football|Clemson]]21.667Lost 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship
Won 2019 College Football Playoff National Championship
2016, 2018
1[[Ohio State Buckeyes football|Ohio State]]101.000Won 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship 2014
1[[Oregon Ducks football|Oregon]]01.000Lost 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship
1[[Georgia Bulldogs football|Georgia]]01.000Lost 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship

College Football Playoff National Championship appearances by conference

ConferenceAppearancesWLPct# SchoolsSchool(s)
SEC 523.4002Alabama (2–2)
Georgia (0–1)
ACC 321.6671Clemson (2–1)
Big Ten 1101.0001Ohio State (1–0)
Pac-12 101.0001Oregon (0–1)

Big 12 Conference has never appeared in the CFP National Championship

See also

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References

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