Sarah Teichmann

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Sarah Teichmann

Sarah Teichmann-ISMB2016 (28960321841).jpg
Sarah Teichmann speaking at the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) conference in 2016 in Orlando, Florida
Born
Sarah Amalia Teichmann

(1975-04-15) April 15, 1975 (age 43) [1]
Nationality
  • German
  • American [1]
  • British
Education European School, Karlsruhe
Alma mater University of Cambridge (BA, MA, PhD)
ChildrenTwo daughters [2] [3] [4]
Awards
Scientific career
Fields
Institutions
Thesis Genome evolution: analysing proteomes with new methods  (1999)
Doctoral advisor Cyrus Chothia [12] [13]
Doctoral students M. Madan Babu [14]
Influences
Website teichlab.org

Sarah Amalia Teichmann (born 1975) [1] FMedSci [18] is Head of Cellular Genetics at the Wellcome Sanger Institute [19] and a visiting research group leader at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). [20] [12] She is also a Director of Research (equivalent to Professor) [21] in the Cavendish Laboratory, [22] at the University of Cambridge and a Senior Research Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge.[ citation needed ]

Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences award for fellows who are recognised for the excellence of their science, their contribution to medicine and society and the range of their achievements

Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences (FMedSci) is an award for medical scientists who are judged by the Academy of Medical Sciences for the "excellence of their science, their contribution to medicine and society and the range of their achievements".

Wellcome Sanger Institute British genomics research institute

The Wellcome Sanger Institute, previously known as The Sanger Centre and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, is a non-profit British genomics and genetics research institute, primarily funded by the Wellcome Trust.

The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) is an IGO which as part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) family focuses on research and services in bioinformatics.

Contents

Education

Teichmann was educated at the European School, Karlsruhe in Germany from 1981 to 1993 where she completed the European Baccalaureate in 1993. [23] Teichmann went on to study the Natural Sciences Tripos at Trinity College, Cambridge and was awarded a first class Bachelor of Arts degree in 1996. In 1999, she completed her PhD supervised by Cyrus Chothia [24] at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB) on genome evolution. [25]

European School, Karlsruhe school

The European School, Karlsruhe, commonly known as ESK, is one of three official European Schools in Germany. It was the fifth of fourteen such schools to be established in Europe since 1953. The school currently has around one thousand students on role across the kindergarten, primary school and secondary school. The school has offered the European Baccalaureate since 1968.

The European Baccalaureate is a bilingual educational diploma, which certifies the completion of secondary studies in a European School or Accredited European School by the Board of Governors of the intergovernmental organisation, "The European Schools". The diploma is awarded for the successful achievement of coursework and concomitant examinations which require that students take a minimum of 10 courses as well as be fully proficient in two languages. Students may take up to 14 courses. It is officially recognised as an entry qualification for Higher Education in all the member states of the European Union (EU), as well as in a number of others. All participating countries are legally obligated to ensure EB diploma holders enjoy the same rights and benefits as other holders of secondary school-leaving certificates in their jurisdictions. The name ‘European Baccalaureate’ belongs solely to the European Schools, which, since their establishment, have had a monopoly over its use in all the official languages of the EU.

Trinity College, Cambridge constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England

Trinity College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England. With around 600 undergraduates, 300 graduates, and over 180 fellows, it is the largest college in either of the Oxbridge universities by number of undergraduates. In terms of total student numbers, it is second only to Homerton College, Cambridge.

Career and research

Following her PhD, Teichmann did postdoctoral research supervised by Janet Thornton at University College London [20] and funded by the Beit Memorial Fellowships for Medical Research. From 2001-2012, she was a Medical Research Council (MRC) Programme Leader, studying patterns in protein interactions and transcriptional regulatory networks. [26] [27]

Janet Thornton British bioinformatician and academic

Dame Janet Maureen Thornton,HonFRSC is a senior scientist at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). She is one of the world's leading researchers in structural bioinformatics, using computational methods to understand protein structure and function. She was formerly director of the EBI from October 2001 to June 2015, and played a key role in ELIXIR.

Beit Memorial Fellowships for Medical Research

The Beit Memorial Medical Fellowships were one of the most prestigious and competitive fellowships for post-doctoral or medical degree research in medicine in the United Kingdom. The Fellowships were founded in 1909 by Sir Otto Beit, a German-born British financier, philanthropist and art connoisseur, in memory of his brother Alfred Beit.

Medical Research Council (United Kingdom) institution responsible for co-ordinating and funding medical research in the United Kingdom

The Medical Research Council (MRC) is responsible for co-coordinating and funding medical research in the United Kingdom. It is part of United Kingdom Research and Innovation (UKRI), which came into operation 1 April 2018, and brings together the UK’s seven research councils, Innovate UK and Research England. UK Research and Innovation is answerable to, although politically independent from, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

In 2013 Teichmann was appointed a joint position at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). From 2005 to 2015 she was a teaching fellow and Director of Studies at Trinity College, Cambridge. Since 2016 Teichmann has served as the head of Cellular Genetics at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute [19] and a visiting research group leader at the EBI. [12]

A teaching fellow is an individual at a higher education institution, including universities, whose role involves teaching and potentially pedagogic research. The work done by teaching fellows can vary enormously from institution to institution, depending on the requirements and position of individual institutions.

Teichmann's research [28] [29] [30] [31] investigates gene expression [32] [33] [34] and protein complex assembly [35] using both wet laboratory and computational biology techniques. [36] In particular her research group:

Gene expression The process in which a genes sequence is converted into a mature gene product or products (proteins or RNA). This includes the production of an RNA transcript as well as any processing to produce a mature RNA product or an mRNA or circRNA (for prote

Gene expression is the process by which information from a gene is used in the synthesis of a functional gene product. These products are often proteins, but in non-protein coding genes such as transfer RNA (tRNA) or small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes, the product is a functional RNA.

Computational biology involves the development and application of data-analytical and theoretical methods, mathematical modeling and computational simulation techniques to the study of biological, ecological, behavioral, and social systems. The field is broadly defined and includes foundations in biology, applied mathematics, statistics, biochemistry, chemistry, biophysics, molecular biology, genetics, genomics, computer science and evolution.

Teichmann's research has been funded by the European Research Council (ERC), the Medical Research Council (MRC), the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), [38] the Wellcome Trust, the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), the Framework Programmes for Research and Technological Development and the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST). [23]

European Research Council organization

The European Research Council (ERC) is a public body for funding of scientific and technological research conducted within the European Union (EU). Established by the European Commission in 2007, the ERC is composed of an independent Scientific Council, its governing body consisting of distinguished researchers, and an Executive Agency, in charge of the implementation. It forms part of the framework programme of the union dedicated to research and innovation, Horizon 2020, preceded by the Seventh Research Framework Programme (FP7). The ERC budget is over €13 billion from 2014 – 2020 and comes from the Horizon 2020 programme, a part of the European Union's budget. Under Horizon 2020 it is estimated that around 7,000 ERC grantees will be funded and 42,000 team members supported, including 11,000 doctoral students and almost 16,000 post-doctoral researchers.

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), part of UK Research and Innovation, is a NDPB and is the largest UK public funder of non-medical bioscience. It predominantly funds scientific research institutes and university research departments in the UK.

Wellcome Trust Healthcare charity

The Wellcome Trust is a biomedical research charity based in London, United Kingdom. It was established in 1936 with legacies from the pharmaceutical magnate Sir Henry Wellcome to fund research to improve human and animal health. The aim of the Trust is to "achieve extraordinary improvements in health by supporting the brightest minds", and in addition to funding biomedical research it supports the public understanding of science. It has an endowment of £25.9 billion (2018) making it the third wealthiest charitable foundation in the world, after the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the IKEA Foundation.

As of 2015 Teichmann has supervised several PhD students to completion [39] [23] [14] [40] [41] [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] and several postdoctoral researchers who have gone on to become Principal investigators (PIs). [23] [47] [48] [49]

Awards and honours

Teichmann has won a number of awards. In 2010, she was awarded Colworth Medal from the Biochemical Society. [16] [50] In 2012, Teichman was awarded the Francis Crick Medal and Lecture, membership of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) [7] and the Lister Prize from the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine. [6] In 2015 she was awarded the Michael and Kate Bárány Award for young investigators by the Biophysical Society [51] and the EMBO Gold Medal. Teichmann was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences (FMedSci) in 2015. Her citation on election reads:

Teichmann has also been an activist for women's careers in science through enabling scientists in families to advance their careers while working part-time. [17] She chaired a Sex in Science debate at the Wellcome Trust on balancing family life with working in research.[ citation needed ] Teichmann was elected an ISCB Fellow in 2016 by the International Society for Computational Biology. [10]

Personal life

Teichmann has two daughters. [2] [4] Teichmann is the co-author of the children's language education novel Teenage Detectives, [52] which she wrote as a teenager together with her mother Dr. Virginia Teichmann, an English-language university lecturer in Karlsruhe. [53]

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References

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