Tombet

Last updated
Tombet
Tombet6116.JPG
Tombet in a terracotta plate
CourseMain course
Place of origin Spain
Region or state Majorca
Main ingredientsPotatoes, aubergines and red bell peppers

Tombet (Catalan pronunciation:  [tumˈbɛt] ; Spanish : tumbet) is a traditional vegetable dish from Majorca, consisting of layers of sliced potatoes, aubergines and red bell peppers previously fried in olive oil. It is available at almost every local restaurant on the island.

Contents

Tombet is often served along with fish or meat, but on its own it makes a good vegetarian dish.

Preparation

The aubergines and red peppers should not be peeled. The whole is topped with tomato fried with garlic and parsley and presented in a way that it looks like a pie without a crust. [1]

Tombet is the Majorcan version of the Occitan ratatouille or the Catalan samfaina. Influenced by those dishes, nowadays some people add zucchini to the mixture, but this is a vegetable that is not present in the original dish. [2] There are records indicative of a new tombet made in Greenpoint, Brooklyn by Natália Costa who incorporates the cumin element to the traditional recipe.

See also

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