Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Play

Last updated
Tony Award for
Best Featured Actor in a Play
DescriptionBest Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play
Location United States New York City
Presented by American Theatre Wing The Broadway League
Currently held by Bertie Carvel for Ink (2019)
Website TonyAwards.com

The Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Play is an honor presented at the Tony Awards, a ceremony established in 1947 as the Antoinette Perry Awards for Excellence in Theatre, to actors for quality supporting roles in a Broadway play. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the Tony Award Productions, a joint venture of The Broadway League and the American Theatre Wing, to "honor the best performances and stage productions of the previous year." [1]

Contents

Originally called the Tony Award for Actor, Supporting or Featured (Dramatic), the award was first presented to Arthur Kennedy at the 3rd Tony Awards for his portrayal of Biff Loman in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman . [2] Before 1956, nominees' names were not made public; [3] the change was made by the awards committee to "have a greater impact on theatregoers". [4] In 1976, when the award's name changed to its current name, Edward Herrmann, portraying Frank Gardner in George Bernard Shaw's Mrs. Warren's Profession , won the award. [5] Its most recent recipient is Bertie Carvel, for the role of Rupert Murdoch, in Ink . [6]

Frank Langella holds the record for having the most wins in this category, with a total of two; he is the only person to win the award more than once. Richard Roma in Glengarry Glen Ross and Phil Hogan in A Moon for the Misbegotten are the only characters to take the award multiple times, both winning twice. A supporting actor in each of Neil Simon's Eugene trilogy plays ( Brighton Beach Memoirs , Biloxi Blues , and Broadway Bound ) has taken the Tony, whereas featured actors in both parts of Tony Kushner's Angels in America series have also won the award.

Recipients

1959 award winner Charlie Ruggles Charles Ruggles 1963.JPG
1959 award winner Charlie Ruggles
1967 award winner Ian Holm Ian Holm.jpg
1967 award winner Ian Holm
Frank Langella, the only person to win the award multiple times FrankLangella07TIFF.jpg
Frank Langella, the only person to win the award multiple times
1984 award winner Joe Mantegna Joe Mantegna, 2009.jpg
1984 award winner Joe Mantegna
1992 award winner Laurence Fishburne Laurence Fishburne 2009 - cropped.jpg
1992 award winner Laurence Fishburne
1996 award winner Ruben Santiago-Hudson Ruben Santiago Hudson Shankbone NYC 2010.jpg
1996 award winner Ruben Santiago-Hudson
2003 award winner Denis O'Hare Denis O'Hare at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival 2.jpg
2003 award winner Denis O'Hare
2011 award winner John Benjamin Hickey John Benjamin Hickey 2011 01 cropped.jpg
2011 award winner John Benjamin Hickey
Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Play recipients [7] [8]
YearActorRoleWorkNomineesRef.
1949 Arthur Kennedy Biff Loman Death of a Salesman [2]
1950 [lower-alpha 1]
1951 Eli Wallach Alvaro Mangiacavallo The Rose Tattoo [9]
1952 John Cromwell John Gray Point of No Return [10]
1953 John Williams Inspector Hubbard Dial M for Murder [11]
1954 John Kerr Tom Robinson Lee Tea and Sympathy [12]
1955 Francis L. Sullivan Sir Wilfrid Robats, Q.C. Witness for the Prosecution [13]
1956 Ed Begley Matthew Harrison Brady Inherit the Wind [14]
1957 Frank Conroy Father William Callifer The Potting Shed [15]
1958 Henry Jones Louis McHenry Howe Sunrise At Campobello [16]
1959 Charlie Ruggles Mackenzie Savage The Pleasure of His Company [17]
1960 Roddy McDowall Tarquin Edward MendigalesThe Fighting Cock [18]
1961 Martin Gabel Basil Smythe Big Fish, Little Fish [19]
1962 Walter Matthau Benjamin Beaurevers A Shot in the Dark [20]
1963 Alan Arkin David Kolowitz Enter Laughing [21]
1964 Hume Cronyn Polonius Hamlet [22]
1965 Jack Albertson John Cleary The Subject Was Roses [23]
1966 Patrick Magee Marquis de Sade Marat/Sade [24]
1967 Ian Holm Lenny The Homecoming [25]
1968 James Patterson Stanley The Birthday Party [26]
1969 Al Pacino Bickham Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie? [27]
1970 Ken Howard Paul Reese Child's Play [28]
1971 Paul Sand Multiple [lower-alpha 2] Paul Sills' Story Theatre [31]
1972 Vincent Gardenia Harry Edison The Prisoner of Second Avenue [32]
1973 John Lithgow Kenny Kendal The Changing Room [33]
1974 Ed Flanders Phil Hogan A Moon for the Misbegotten [34]
1975 Frank Langella Leslie Seascape [35]
1976 Edward Herrmann Frank Gardner Mrs. Warren's Profession [5]
1977 Jonathan Pryce Gethin Price Comedians [36]
1978 Lester Rawlins Drumm Da [37]
1979 Michael Gough Ernest Bedroom Farce [38]
1980 David Rounds Homer Bolton Morning's at Seven [39]
1981 Brian Backer Paul Pollack The Floating Light Bulb [40]
1982 Zakes Mokae Sam Master Harold...and the Boys [41]
1983 Matthew Broderick Eugene Jerome Brighton Beach Memoirs [42]
1984 Joe Mantegna Richard Roma Glengarry Glen Ross [43]
1985 Barry Miller Arnold Epstein Biloxi Blues [44]
1986 John Mahoney Artie Shaughnessy The House of Blue Leaves [45]
1987 John Randolph Ben Broadway Bound [46]
1988 BD Wong Song Liling M. Butterfly [47]
1989 Boyd Gaines Peter Patrone The Heidi Chronicles [48]
1990 Charles Durning Big Daddy Cat on a Hot Tin Roof [49]
1991 Kevin Spacey "Uncle" Louie Lost in Yonkers [50]
1992 Laurence Fishburne Sterling Two Trains Running [51]
1993 Stephen Spinella Prior Walter Angels in America: Millennium Approaches [52]
1994 Jeffrey Wright Multiple [lower-alpha 3] Angels in America: Perestroika
1995 John Glover John and James Jeckyll Love! Valour! Compassion! [54]
1996 Ruben Santiago-Hudson Canewell Seven Guitars [55]
1997 Owen Teale Torvald Helmer A Doll's House [56]
1998 Tom Murphy Ray Dooley The Beauty Queen of Leenane [57]
1999 Frank Wood Gene Side Man [58]
2000 Roy Dotrice Phil Hogan A Moon for the Misbegotten [59]
2001 Robert Sean Leonard A. E. Housman, from ages 18 to 26 The Invention of Love [60]
2002 Frank Langella Flegont Alexandrovitch Tropatchov Fortune's Fool [61]
2003 Denis O'Hare Mason Marzak Take Me Out [62]
2004 Brían F. O'Byrne Ralph Frozen [63]
2005 Liev Schreiber Richard Roma Glengarry Glen Ross [64]
2006 Ian McDiarmid Teddy Faith Healer [65]
2007 Billy Crudup Vissarion Belinsky The Coast of Utopia [66]
2008 Jim Norton Richard Harkin The Seafarer [67]
2009 Roger Robinson Bynum Walker Joe Turner's Come and Gone [68]
2010 Eddie Redmayne Ken Red [69]
2011 John Benjamin Hickey Felix Turner The Normal Heart [70]
2012 Christian Borle Black Stache Peter and the Starcatcher [71]
2013 Courtney B. Vance Hap Hairston Lucky Guy [72]
2014 Mark Rylance Countess Olivia Twelfth Night [73]
2015 Richard McCabe Harold Wilson The Audience [74]
2016 Reed Birney Erik Blake The Humans [75]
2017 Michael Aronov Uri Savir Oslo [76]
2018 Nathan Lane Roy Cohn ,et al Angels in America [77]
2019 Bertie Carvel Rupert Murdoch Ink [6]
2020 TBA TBA TBA

Wins total

2 Wins

Nominations total

Character win total

2 Wins

Character nomination total

3 Nominations
2 Nominations

Trivia

See also

Notes

  1. The Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Play was not presented in 1950.
  2. Paul Sills' Story Theatre consists of ten one-act plays; [29] Sand played as Cowherd in "The Little Peasant", the Rich Peasant in "The Little Peasant", Robber Bridegroom in "The Robber Bridegroom", Turkey Lurkey in "Henny Penny", Clerk in "The Master Thief", Soldier in "The Master Thief", Simpleton in "The Golden Goose", and Hound in "Town Musicians of Bremen". [30]
  3. Wright played as Mr. Lies, Belize, and as a member of the Council of Principalities. [53]

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