Wallingford (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Wallingford
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
1295–1885
Replaced by Abingdon

Wallingford was a constituency in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Contents

It was a parliamentary borough created in 1295, centred on the market town Wallingford in Berkshire (now in Oxfordshire). It used to return two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons; this was cut to one in 1832, and the constituency was abolished in 1885. The town of Wallingford is now within the constituency of Wantage.

History

Before 1832 the borough consisted only of the town of Wallingford, which by the 19th century was divided into four parishes. The franchise was limited to (male) inhabitants paying scot and lot, a local tax. Namier and Brooke estimated that the number of electors in the mid-18th century was about 200; but the number fluctuated considerably with the fortunes of the town, which had no manufacturing interests and considerable unemployment at some periods. There were never enough voters to avoid the risk of corruption, and systematic bribery generally prevailed, with anything up to 150 votes being bought and sold at any one election. (In 1754, Thomas Sewell, one of the Whig candidates, spent over £1000 of his own money and not only was this reimbursed from the "secret service" funds but the government spent further money unsuccessfully attempting to secure him a seat in Wallingford.) By the 19th century Wallingford was regarded as one of the worst of the rotten boroughs, and Oldfield recorded in 1816 that the price of a vote was 40 guineas.

The 1831 census found the borough had a population of about 2,500, and 485 houses. Under the Reform Act 1832, the constituency was allowed to survive and to keep one of its two MPs, but the boundaries were considerably extended, taking in the Wallingford Castle precincts, which had previously been excluded, and all or part of a dozen neighbouring parishes including Benson and Crowmarsh, and part of Cholsey. This change of boundaries almost trebled the population, but the effect on the electorate was much smaller. According to the reports on which the Reform Act was based, Wallingford had about 300 men qualified to vote in 1831 (though no more than 230 had ever voted in the previous thirty years). Yet despite the widening of the right to vote, which preserved the ancient right voters of the borough while adding new electors on an occupation franchise, there were only 453 names on the 1832 electoral register for the extended borough. (Stooks Smith records that 166 of these claimed their vote as scot and lot payers, while 287 qualified as £10 occupiers; but many of the latter group presumably paid scot and lot within the old boundaries and could have voted before the Reform Act.)

In 1868 the franchise was further extended and there were 942 registered electors, but the constituency was much too small to survive the Third Reform Act, and was abolished with effect from the general election of 1885. The constituency was mostly included in the new Berkshire North or Abingdon county constituency, but Benson and the other parts of the extended borough on the Oxfordshire side of the Thames were placed in the Oxfordshire South or Henley division of that county.

Members of Parliament

1295–1640

ParliamentFirst memberSecond member
1302 Osbert de Notele William Clericus
1304 Nicholas de la Barre William Mareschal
1306 Nicholas de la Barre Richard de Cippenham
1306 John Mariot Osbert de Notele
1307 Nicholas de la Barre John Mariot
1309 Thomas de Morton Thomas Bene
1311 Nicholas de la Barre Osbert de Notele
1311 Nicholas de la Barre Osbert de Notele
1312 Nicholas de la Barre Richard de Cippenham
1313 Nicholas de la Barre William Butty
1314 Walter at Russhe William Butty
1314/5 Osbert de Notele Thomas Bone
1318 Thomas Garston Thomas Bone
1327 John Osbern Richard Grotard
1320 Thomas Bone Thomas Bortorat
1321 Nicholas de la Barre John Osbern
1322 Reginald de Bradebourn Alexander le Vacher
1322 Thomas at Gaston Alexander le Vacher
1323 Osbert de Notele Reginald de Bradebourn
1325 Robert Butty Richard Reswald
1327 John Osbern Roger de Saucer
1328 Thomas Bone John Osbern
1328 John Osbern John Breton
1329 John Mariot William Arnyot
1330 John Mariot Robert Butty
1331 John Mariot Robert Butty
1331 Thomas Bone William de Dene
1333 John Mariot John de Preston
1335 William de Cornwall Philip Preston
1335 William de Cornwall Thomas Bone
1336 William de Cornwall Edmund Bonham
1336 William de Cornwall Thomas Bone
1337 John Mariot William de Cornwall
1337 John Mariot William de Cornwall
1338 William le Goldsmith John Berewyk
1338 John Mariot William Arnyat
1339 John Stacy Thomas Batheshall
1339 Robert Butty William le Goldsmith
1341 John Mariot Robert Butty
1344 Roger Tylewyne John Berewyk
1347 John atte Ruysshe John at Barston
1348 Philip de Preston William le Goldsmith
1350/1 William Harewell Thomas Reynald
1355 John Louch John Brightwalton
1357/8 Robert Berot John Heronn
1360 John Louch John Andrew
1360 Nicholas Payable Roger Preston
1362 William Harewell Henry Redyng
1363 William Harewell Alexander Absolan
1364 John James Roger Preston
1366 John James Nicholas Payable
1368 Nicholas Tanner
1369 John James Nicholas Tanner
1370 John James Richard Attefelde
1371 John James Richard Attefelde
1372 Richard Attefelde Roger Melbourne
1373 Thomas Grove Roger Arnyate
1375 John James Richard Attefelde
1376 Thomas Beneshef Henry de Bedyng
1377 Thomas Reynald Richard Attefelde
1378 Roger Arnyate
1379/80 Roger Melbourne Walter Hervy
1381 Roger Melbourne
1383 Thomas Grove Robert Oxenford
1383 Roger Melbourne John Kerre
1383 Roger Arnyate John Kerre
1384 Thomas Grove John Lyttel
1384 Thomas Grove Walter Harby
1385 Thomas Beneshef Robert Oxenford
1386 Thomas Beneshef John Derby
1387 Thomas Beneshef Roger Melbourne
1388 Richard de Brugge John Bernard
1389 John Cotterell Roger Melbourne
1391 Richard Hovelock William Hende
1392 John Cotterell William Cary
1393 John Cotterell John Derby
1394 John Cotterell John Derby
1396 John Cotterell Robert Oxenford
1397 John Cotterell Walter Colete
1399 Walter Hervy John Culham
1405/6 William Essex Walter Hyndon
1407 John Culham William Clowd
1409/10 John Cotterell William Cotterell
1413 Thomas Ravening Lewis John
1413/4 Robert Deffonte Robert Carswell
1419 John Denby Richard Algate
1420 John Cotterell Richard Algate
1421 John Cotterell John Mercham
1421 John Warfeld William Bodyngton
1422 John Warfeld Laurence Haweman
1423 Laurence Haweman Henry Payne
1429 John Mercham Thomas Jones
1425/6 Laurence Haweman John Denby
1427 John Warfeld William Borde
1429 John Warfeld Laurence Haweman
1430/1 John Warfeld Thomas Ramsey
1432 John Warfeld William Bodyngton
1433 John Warfeld William Bodyngton
1435 John Warfeld William Borde
1436/7 John Warfeld William Borde
1441/2 John Bruggewater John Stoke
1446 John Stoke Robert Dalby
1448 Thomas Carlyll Henry Herleton
1449 Robert Hopton Thomas Browne
1450 Henry Spencer Richard Bulstrode
1452/3 Thomas Preston John Burgh
1459 Richard Houghton Henry Spencer
1460 William Bedeston John Bydon
1467 John Colynggrugge Robert Hopton
1472 Thomas Roos Thomas Ashynden
1477/8 Thomas Wode Thomas Vynsent
1529 Edward Chamberlain Godelacius Overton
1536 Thomas Denton
1547Sir Thomas Parry Henry Hontley
1552-3Sir Thomas Parry George Wright
1553 George Wright Edmund Plowden
1554 Edmund Ashfield Anthony Butler
1554 Edmund Ashfield Robert Cockson
1555Sir Thomas Parry Thomas Mynde
1557 Thomas Mynde Radulphus Pollyngton
1558-9 Thomas Mynde John Fortesque
1563 William Dunch Thomas Browne
1571 Sir Edmund Dunch Thomas Dudley
1572 Thomas Digges John Fortesque
1584 Christopher Edmonds Richard Knollys
1586 Richard Knollys Thomas Stampe
1588/9 Michael Molyns Thomas Stampe
1592/3 Thomas Fortescue Anthony Bacon
1597 Thomas Fortescue Owen Oglethorpe
1601(Sir John Herbert)
sat for Glamorgan
and replaced by
Thomas Fortescue
Henry Doyley
1604 Sir William Dunch Griffith Payne
1614 Sir Carew Reynell Sir George Simeon
1621–1622 Sir George Simeon Samuel Dunch
1624(Sir Edward Howard)
sat for Calne, Wiltshire
and replaced by
Sir Anthony Forrest
Sir George Simeon
1625 Sir Anthony Forrest Michael Molyns
1625 Sir Anthony Forrest Unton Croke
1628–1629 Sir Robert Knollys Edmund Dunch
1629–1640No parliaments summoned

1640–1832

YearFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond party
April 1660 Robert Packer Hungerford Dunch [upper-alpha 1]
June 1660 Thomas Saunders
1661 Hon. George Fane
1663 Sir John Bennet
February 1679 John Stone Scorey Barker
August 1679 William Lenthall
1681 Taverner Harris
1685 John Stone John Holloway
1689 Thomas Tipping William Jennens
1690 John Wallis
1695 Sir Thomas Tipping
1698 Richard Pye
1701 William Jennens Thomas Renda
1705 Clement Kent
1708 Grey Neville
1709 Thomas Renda
1710 Simon Harcourt
1713 Richard Bigg
1714 Thomas Renda
1715 Edmund Dunch Whig William Hucks
1719 Henry Grey Whig
1722 Viscount Parker
1727 George Lewen
1734 Thomas Tower
1740 Joseph Townsend
1741 John Bance John Rush
1747 Joseph Townsend Richard Tonson
1754 John Hervey Richard Ashcroft Bedford Whig
1761 Sir John Gibbons, Bt
1765 Sir George Pigot, Bt [upper-alpha 2]
1768 Robert Pigot John Aubrey
1772 John Cator
1774 Sir Robert Barker
1780 Chaloner Arcedeckne John Aubrey
1784 Sir Francis Sykes, Bt
1784 Thomas Aubrey
1790 Nathaniel Wraxall
1794 Francis Sykes Tory
1796 The Lord Eardley Whig Tory
1802 William Hughes Whig
1804 George Galway Mills
1806 Richard Benyon Tory
1812 Ebenezer Maitland Tory
1820 George James Robarts Whig
1826 Robert Knight Whig
1831 Thomas Leigh Whig

1832–1885

YearMemberPartyNote
1832 William Seymour Blackstone Tory [1]
1834 Conservative [1]
1852 Richard Malins Conservative
1865 Sir Wentworth Dilke, Bt Liberal
1868 Stanley Vickers Conservative Died 24 February 1872
1872 Edward Wells Conservative
1880 Walter Wren Liberal Election declared void, on petition, 19 June 1880
1880 Pandeli Ralli Liberal

Notes

Elections

Electoral system: The bloc vote electoral system was used in two seat elections and first past the post for single member elections. Each voter had up to as many votes as there were seats to be filled. Votes had to be cast by a spoken declaration, in public, at the hustings (until the secret ballot was introduced in 1872).

Percentage change calculations: Where there was only one candidate of a party in successive elections, for the same number of seats, change is calculated on the party percentage vote. Where there was more than one candidate, in one or both successive elections for the same number of seats, then change is calculated on the individual percentage vote.

Sources (unless otherwise indicated): (1754–1784) Namier and Brooke; (1790–1831) Stooks Smith; (1832–1880) Craig. Where Stooks Smith gives additional information or differs from the other sources this is indicated in a note after the result.

Swing: Positive swing is from Whig/Liberal to Tory/Conservative. Negative swing is from Tory/Conservative to Whig/Liberal.

1750-1760s1770-1780s

1790s1800s1810s1820s1830s1840s1850s1860s1870s1880s

Elections in the 1750s and 1760s

General election 15 April 1754: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan John Hervey ElectedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Richard Ashcroft ElectedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Thomas Sewell DefeatedN/AN/A
Non Partisan The Viscount Castlecomer 1DefeatedN/AN/A
General election 25 March 1761: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan ' John Hervey'Unopposed
Non Partisan ' John Gibbons'Unopposed
By-Election 15 January 1765: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan ' George Pigot'Unopposed
Non Partisan hold
General election 16 March 1768: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan John Aubrey 6939.7N/A
Non Partisan Robert Pigot 6738.5N/A
Non Partisan John Gibbons 3821.8N/A
Turnout 174N/AN/A

Elections in the 1770s and 1780s

By-Election 27 January 1772: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan John Cator 9052.9N/A
Non Partisan Robert Pigot 8047.1N/A
Majority105.9N/A
Turnout 170N/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General election 8 October 1774: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan John Cator ElectedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Robert Barker ElectedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Thomas Wenman DefeatedN/AN/A
Non Partisan William Nedham DefeatedN/AN/A
General election 8 September 1780: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan ' John Aubrey''Unopposed
Non Partisan ' Chaloner Arcedeckne'Unopposed
By-Election 15 July 1782: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan ' John Aubrey'Unopposed
Non Partisan hold
By-Election 30 December 1783: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan John Aubrey 11366.1N/A
Non Partisan Thomas Keating 5833.9N/A
Majority5532.2N/A
Turnout 171N/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
By-Election January 1784: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan ' Francis Sykes'Unopposed
Non Partisan hold
General election 31 March 1784: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan ' Francis Sykes'Unopposed
Non Partisan ' Thomas Aubrey'Unopposed

Elections in the 1790s

General election 1790: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan ' Francis Sykes'Unopposed
Non Partisan ' Nathaniel Wraxall'Unopposed
By-Election March 1794: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Tory ' Francis Sykes'Unopposed
Tory gain from Non Partisan
General election 1796: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Tory ' Francis Sykes'Unopposed
Whig ' Sampson Eardley 1

'

Unopposed

Elections in the 1800s

General election 1802: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Tory ' Francis Sykes'Unopposed
Whig ' William Hughes'Unopposed
By-Election February 1804: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan ' George Galway Mills'Unopposed
Non Partisan gain from Tory
General election 1806: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig ' William Hughes'Unopposed
Tory ' Richard Benyon'Unopposed
General election 1807: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig ' William Hughes'Unopposed
Tory ' Richard Benyon'Unopposed

Elections in the 1810s

General election 1812: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig ' William Hughes'Unopposed
Tory ' Ebenezer Maitland'Unopposed
General election 1818: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig William Hughes ElectedN/AN/A
Tory Ebenezer Maitland ElectedN/AN/A
Whig George James Robarts DefeatedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1820s

General election 1820: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig William Hughes ElectedN/AN/A
Whig George James Robarts ElectedN/AN/A
Tory Ebenezer Maitland DefeatedN/AN/A
General election 1826: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig William Hughes 15142.4N/A
Whig George James Robarts 12535.1N/A
Tory John Dodson8022.5N/A
Turnout 356N/AN/A
By-Election December 1826: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Robert Knight 11758.2N/A
Tory John Bailey 8441.8N/A
Majority3316.4N/A
Turnout 201N/AN/A
Whig hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1830: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig ' William Hughes'Unopposed
Whig ' Robert Knight'Unopposed
General election 1831: Wallingford (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig ' William Hughes'Unopposed
Whig ' Robert Knight'Unopposed
By-Election September 1831: Wallingford
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Thomas Charles Leigh 11963.6N/A
Tory William Seymour Blackstone 6836.4N/A
Majority5127.3N/A
Turnout 187N/AN/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
General election 1832: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative William Seymour Blackstone 20255.0+18.7
Liberal Charles Eyston 16545.0-18.7
Majority3710.1N/A
Turnout 36781.0N/A
Registered electors 453
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +18.7
General election 1835: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative ' William Seymour Blackstone'Unopposed
Registered electors 366
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General election 1837: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative William Seymour Blackstone 15957.4N/A
Liberal Thomas Teed 11842.6N/A
Majority4114.8N/A
Turnout 27783.18N/A
Registered electors 333
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1840s

General election 1841: Wallingford [1] [2]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative William Seymour Blackstone Unopposed
Registered electors 386
Conservative hold
General election 1847: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative William Seymour Blackstone 166 51.9 N/A
Whig Alfred Morrison [3] 15448.1N/A
Majority123.8N/A
Turnout 32080.4N/A
Registered electors 398
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1852: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Richard Malins 174 50.9 -1.0
Whig Alfred Morrison [3] [4] 16849.1+1.0
Majority61.8-2.0
Turnout 34279.9-0.5
Registered electors 428
Conservative hold Swing -1.0
General election 1857: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Richard Malins 149 52.5 +1.6
Whig Alfred Sartoris [5] [6] 13547.5-1.6
Majority144.9+3.2
Turnout 28476.5-3.4
Registered electors 371
Conservative hold Swing +1.6
General election 1859: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Richard Malins Unopposed
Registered electors 381
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1865: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Wentworth Dilke 158 54.5 N/A
Conservative Richard Malins 13245.5N/A
Majority269.0N/A
Turnout 29081.2N/A
Registered electors 357
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
General election 1868: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Stanley Vickers 453 55.9 +10.3
Liberal Wentworth Dilke 35844.1-10.3
Majority9511.7N/A
Turnout 81186.1+4.9
Registered electors 942
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +10.3

Elections in the 1870s

By-Election 9 March 1872: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Edward Wells Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1874: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Edward Wells 575 56.8 N/A
Liberal Edwin Jones [7] 43743.2N/A
Majority13813.6N/A
Turnout 1,01288.7N/A
Registered electors 1,141
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1880: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Walter Wren 582 51.8 +8.7
Conservative Edward Wells 54148.2-8.7
Majority413.7N/A
Turnout 1,12391.6+2.9
Registered electors 1,226
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing -8.7
By-Election 1 July 1880: Wallingford [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Pandeli Ralli 567 50.9 0.9
Conservative Robert William Hanbury 54849.1+0.9
Majority191.72.0
Turnout 1,11591.00.6
Registered electors 1,226
Liberal hold Swing 0.9

Notes:-

Notes

  1. Dunch was also elected for Cricklade, which he chose to represent, and did not sit for Wallingford
  2. The Lord Pigot from 1766

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885(e-book)|format= requires |url= (help) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. p. 316. ISBN   978-1-349-02349-3.
  2. Stooks Smith 1973.
  3. 1 2 "Wallingford" . Berkshire Chronicle. 3 July 1847. p. 3. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  4. "The General Election" . Morning Post. 24 July 1847. p. 3. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. "Oxford Chronicle and Reading Gazette" . 21 March 1857. pp. 7–8. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  6. "Oxford University and City Herald" . 21 March 1857. p. 9. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. "Wallingford" . Reading Mercury. 7 March 1874. p. 4. Retrieved 21 January 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.

Sources

  1. British Parliamentary Election Results 1832–1885, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (The Macmillan Press 1977)
  2. J. K. Hedges, Wallingford History (London: Wm Clowes, 1881)
  3. Lewis Namier, The Structure of Politics at the Accession of George III (2nd edition – London: St Martin's Press, 1961)
  4. Sir Lewis Namier and John Brooke, The House of Commons 1754–1790, (London: HMSO, 1964)
  5. Robert Henry O'Byrne The representative history of Great Britain and Ireland, comprising biographical and genealogical notices of the Members of Parliament from Edward VI 1547 to Victoria 1847. (London, John Ollivier, 1848)
  6. T. H. B. Oldfield, The Representative History of Great Britain and Ireland (London: Baldwin, Cradock & Joy, 1816)
  7. J Holladay Philbin, Parliamentary Representation 1832 – England and Wales (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1965)
  8. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "W" (part 1)
  9. M. Stenton (ed.), Who's Who of British Members of Parliament: Volume I 1832–1885 (The Harvester Press, 1976)
  10. Stooks Smith, Henry (1973) [1844–1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 9–11. ISBN   0-900178-13-2.
  11. Frederic A Youngs, "Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England, Vol I" (London: Royal Historical Society, 1979)