Athletics at the 1932 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

Last updated
Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the X Olympiad
Venue Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
DatesJuly 31, 1932 (heats, quarterfinals)
August 1, 1932 (semifinals, final)
Competitors33 from 17 nations
Winning time10.3 seconds
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Eddie Tolan US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Ralph Metcalfe US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Bronze medal icon.svg Arthur Jonath Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany
  1928
1936  
Official Video on YouTube TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video on YouTube

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California, United States, were held at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on July 31 and August 1. [1] Thirty-three runners from 17 nations competed. The 1930 Olympic Congress in Berlin had reduced the limit from 4 athletes per NOC to 3 athletes. [2]

Contents

The photo finish final was won by American Eddie Tolan in a world record-equalling time of 10.38 seconds. Teammate Ralph Metcalfe won the silver and was credited with the same time as Tolan. [3] It was the first American victory since 1920, after the United States was kept off the podium entirely in 1928. Germany won its second consecutive bronze medal in the event. Defending Olympic champion and world record holder Percy Williams of Canada did not advance past the semifinals. Takayoshi Yoshioka was the first Asian to make the final. [4]

Background

This was the ninth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. Notable entrants included Canada's Percy Williams, the defending gold medalist and world record holder, and American Ralph Metcalfe, NCAA champion and U.S. Olympic trial winner. [4]

Two electrical timing devices, one hand-operated and one camera-based, were introduced to "double check" the stop watches. [5] [6]

China was represented in the event for the first time. The United States was the only nation to have appeared at each of the first nine Olympic men's 100 metres events.

Competition format

The event retained the four round format from 1920–1928: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. There were 7 heats, of 4–6 athletes each, with the top 3 in each heat advancing to the quarterfinals. The 21 quarterfinalists (19 after two withdrawals) were placed into 4 heats of 4 or 5 athletes. Again, the top 3 advanced. There were 2 heats of 6 semifinalists, once again with the top 3 advancing to the 6-man final. [4]

Records

These are the standing world and Olympic records (in seconds) prior to the 1932 Summer Olympics.

World Record10.3 Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg Percy Williams Toronto (CAN)August 9, 1930
Olympic Record10.6 Flag of the United States.svg Donald Lippincott Stockholm (SWE)July 6, 1912
10.6 Flag of the United States.svg Charlie Paddock Antwerp (BEL)August 16, 1920
10.6 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Harold Abrahams Paris (FRA)July 6/7 1924
10.6 Flag of the United States.svg Robert McAllister Amsterdam (NED)July 29/30 1928
10.6 Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg Percy Williams Amsterdam (NED)July 30, 1928
10.6 Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Wilfred Legg Amsterdam (NED)July 30, 1928

Arthur Jonath equalled the standing Olympic record with 10.6 in the third heat of the first round. Eddie Tolan set a new Olympic record with 10.4 in the first heat of the quarterfinals, and equalled the world record of 10.3 in the final along with Ralph Metcalfe.

Results

Heats

Heat one

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Eddie Tolan US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.9Q
2 José de Almeida Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 11.0Q
3 Fernando Ortíz Flag of the United Mexican States (1916-1934).svg  Mexico 11.2Q
4 André Théard Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti 11.4
5 António Rodrigues Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 11.5
Fred Reid Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain DNF

Heat two

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 George Simpson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.9
2 Ernie Page Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.1
3 Andrej Engel Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 11.2
4 Bunoo Sutton British Raj Red Ensign.svg  India 11.4
5 Liu Changchun Flag of the Republic of China.svg China 11.5

Heat three

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Arthur Jonath Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 10.6Q, =WR
2 Allan Elliot Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 10.8Q
3 Izuo Anno Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.9Q
4 Ronald Vernieux British Raj Red Ensign.svg  India 11.0
5 Samuel Giacosa Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11.1

Heat four

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Carlos Bianchi Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 10.8Q
2 Helmut Körnig Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 11.0Q
3 Percy Williams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 11.1Q
4 Jesús Moraila Flag of the United Mexican States (1916-1934).svg  Mexico 11.2

Heat five

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ralph Metcalfe US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0Q
2 Bert Pearson Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 11.1Q
3 Angelos Lambrou Flag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece 11.3Q
4 Fernando Ramírez Flag of the United Mexican States (1916-1934).svg  Mexico 11.4

Heat six

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Danie Joubert Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg  South Africa 11.0Q
2 Harold Wright Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 11.2Q
3 Ernst Geerling Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 11.3Q
4 Ricardo Guimarães Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 11.4

Heat seven

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Takayoshi Yoshioka Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.9Q
2 Chris Berger Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.1Q
3 Héctor Berra Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11.2Q
4 Stanley Fuller Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.3
5 Mario Marques Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 11.5

Quarterfinals

Berra and Lambrou withdrew before the quarterfinals.

Quarterfinal one

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Eddie Tolan US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.53Q, OR
2 Carlos Bianchi Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 10.5Q
3 Percy Williams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.7Q
4 Chris Berger Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 10.7
5 Fernando Ortíz Flag of the United Mexican States (1916-1934).svg  Mexico 11.0

Quarterfinal two

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 George Simpson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.74Q
2 Harold Wright Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.9Q
3 Helmut Körnig Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 11.0Q
4 Andrej Engel Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 11.1

Quarterfinal three

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ralph Metcalfe US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.77Q
2 Takayoshi Yoshioka Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.8Q
3 Allan Elliot Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 10.9Q
4 Ernie Page Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.9
5 Ernst Geerling Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 11.1

Quarterfinal four

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Arthur Jonath Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 10.68Q
2 Danie Joubert Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg  South Africa 10.6Q
3 Bert Pearson Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.7Q
4 José de Almeida Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 10.8
5 Izuo Anno Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.9

Semifinals

Semifinal one

The finish was close enough that the timing showed errors. Film of the race indicates that Yoshioka won, with Joubert second, and Tolan third, while officials clocked Tolan at 10.81 seconds, Joubert also at 10.81 seconds, and Yoshioka at 10.83 seconds. Because all three advanced to the final anyway, the discrepancy did not matter. [4]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Eddie Tolan US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.81Q
2 Danie Joubert Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg  South Africa 10.81Q
3 Takayoshi Yoshioka Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.83Q
4 Percy Williams Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.91
5 Allan Elliot Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 11.0
6 Helmut Körnig Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 11.2

Semifinal two

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ralph Metcalfe US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.65Q
2 George Simpson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.70Q
3 Arthur Jonath Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 10.71Q
4 Carlos Bianchi Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 10.73
5 Bert Pearson Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 10.95
6 Harold Wright Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 11.1

Final

Under the rules in force at the time, runners were judged to have finished the race when they had crossed the line; in 1933, this was changed so that runners finished the race when they reached the line.

The final was close enough that had this rule been in force at the Games, Metcalfe would have been the winner: Melcalfe reached the finish line first, but Tolan, who was shorter, [7] crossed the line first. [8] [9]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Eddie Tolan US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.38 =WR
Silver medal icon.svg Ralph Metcalfe US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.38 =WR
Bronze medal icon.svg Arthur Jonath Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 10.50
4 George Simpson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.53
5 Danie Joubert Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg  South Africa 10.60
6 Takayoshi Yoshioka Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.79

Related Research Articles

Eddie Tolan

Thomas Edward "Eddie" Tolan, nicknamed the "Midnight Express", was an American track and field athlete who competed in sprints. He set world records in the 100-yard dash and 100 meters event and Olympic records in the 100 meters and 200 meters events. He was the first non-Euro-American to receive the title of the "world's fastest human" after winning gold medals in the 100 and 200 meters events at the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. In March 1935, Tolan won the 75, 100 and 220-yard events at the World Professional Sprint Championships in Melbourne to become the first man to win both the amateur and professional world sprint championships. In his full career as a sprinter, Tolan won 300 races and lost only 7.

Ralph Metcalfe

Ralph Harold Metcalfe Sr. was an American track and field sprinter and politician. He jointly held the world record in the 100-meter dash and placed second in that event in two Olympics, first to Eddie Tolan in 1932 at Los Angeles and then to Jesse Owens at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, Germany. Metcalfe won four Olympic medals and was regarded as the world's fastest human in 1934 and 1935. He later went into politics in the city of Chicago and served in the United States Congress for four terms in the 1970s as a Democrat from Illinois.

Athletics at the 1900 Summer Olympics – Mens 100 metres Athletics at the Olympics

The men's 100 metres was a sprinting event on the athletics programme at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris. It was held on July 14, 1900. 20 athletes from nine nations competed. The event was won by Frank Jarvis of the United States, the second of three straight gold medals by different Americans in the event. Australia medaled in the event for the first time, a bronze by Stan Rowley.

The men's 100 metres at the 2000 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Stadium Australia from September 22 to 23. Ninety-seven athletes from 71 nations competed. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by American Maurice Greene, the United States's first title in the event since 1988 and 15th overall. Ato Boldon of Trinidad and Tobago improved on his 1996 bronze with a silver in Sydney. Obadele Thompson won the first-ever medal in the men's 100 metres for Barbados with bronze.

Athletics at the 1912 Summer Olympics – Mens 200 metres Olympic athletics event

The men's 200 metres was a track and field athletics event held as part of the Athletics at the 1912 Summer Olympics programme. It was the fourth appearance of the event, which has appeared at every edition of the Summer Olympics since the 1900 Summer Olympics. The competition was held on July 10, 1912, and on July 11, 1912. 61 runners from 19 nations competed. NOCs could enter up to 12 athletes. The event was won by Ralph Craig of the United States, the nation's third victory in four Games. Another American, Donald Lippincott, took silver. Great Britain earned its first medal in the 200 metres with Willie Applegarth's bronze.

Athletics at the 1932 Summer Olympics – Mens 200 metres Olympic athletics event

The men's 200 metres sprint event at the 1932 Summer Olympics took place on August 2 and August 3 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. There were 25 athletes from 13 nations. The 1930 Olympic Congress in Berlin had reduced the limit from 4 athletes per NOC to 3 athletes. After missing the podium entirely in 1928, the United States swept the medals in the event in 1932. It was the second medal sweep in the event by the United States (1904) as well as the nation's sixth victory in eight Games. Eddie Tolan was the winner, with George Simpson second and Ralph Metcalfe third.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia, was held at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on 23 and 24 November. Sixty-five athletes from 31 nations competed; each nation was limited to three athletes. The final was won by American Bobby Morrow, marking the fifth consecutive victory by a different American. Hec Hogan of Australia won that country's first medal in the event since 1900. The competition took place in strong winds, with the final run into a 2.5 m/s (5.6 mph) headwind.

Athletics at the 2008 Summer Olympics – Mens 200 metres Olympic athletics event

The men's 200 metres at the 2008 Summer Olympics took place on 18–20 August at the Beijing National Stadium. There were 63 competitors from 53 nations. Jamaican Usain Bolt set a new world record of 19.30 seconds in the final, and won by the largest margin of victory in an Olympic 200 metres final. It was Jamaica's first victory in the event since 1976 and second overall, matching Canada and Italy for second-most. The apparent silver and bronze medalists, Churandy Martina of the Netherlands Antilles and Wallace Spearmon of the United States, were both disqualified. Those medals went to Americans Shawn Crawford and Walter Dix, who had been fourth and fifth across the finish line; Crawford gave his silver medal to Martina afterward. Crawford was the 10th man to win two medals in the 200 metres, and the third for whom those medals were gold and silver; nobody had yet won two gold medals.

Athletics at the 1960 Summer Olympics – Mens 200 metres Olympic athletics event

The men's 200 metres was held on 2 September and 3 September as part of the athletics at the 1960 Summer Olympics, which were held in Rome. 74 athletes from 54 nations entered, but only 62 athletes from 47 nations ultimately competed. The maximum number of athletes per nation had been set at 3 since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Livio Berruti of Italy, the first victory in the event by a nation outside of North America and snapping a five-Games winning streak by the United States. The Americans finished with a silver medal, by Lester Carney, to extend their medal streak to six Games. Abdoulaye Seye of France took bronze. Berruti's gold and Seye's bronze were the first medal for their nations in the men's 200 metres.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, Germany, were held at Olympiastadion on 2 and 3 August. The final was won by American Jesse Owens, and teammate Ralph Metcalfe repeated as silver medalist. Tinus Osendarp of the Netherlands won that nation's first medal in the men's 100 metres, a bronze.

Athletics at the 1936 Summer Olympics – Mens 200 metres Olympic athletics event

The men's 200 metres sprint event at the 1936 Olympic Games took place between August 4 and August 5. There were 44 athletes from 22 nations competing. The maximum number of athletes per nation had been set at 3 since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by African American Jesse Owens, with silver going to Mack Robinson. Owens thus reached 3 gold medals in 1936, with the sprint relay still to come. The Netherlands earned its first medal in the men's 200 metres with Tinus Osendarp's bronze.

Athletics at the 1936 Summer Olympics – Mens 400 metres hurdles Olympic athletics event

The men's 400 metres hurdles event at the 1936 Summer Olympic Games took place on August 3 and August 4. There were 32 competitors from 20 nations. The maximum number of athletes per nation had been set at 3 since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by American Glenn Hardin. After two Games of silver and bronze medals, it was the United States' first victory since 1920 and sixth overall. However, it was the first time since 1900 that the Americans had only one medalist in the event. John Loaring took Canada's first 400 metres hurdles medal since 1900 with his silver. Miguel White gave the Philippines a bronze in its 400 metres hurdles debut.

The men's 400 metres sprint event at the 1932 Olympic Games took place on August 4 and August 5 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Twenty-seven athletes from 15 nations competed. The 1930 Olympic Congress in Berlin had reduced the limit from 4 athletes per NOC to 3 athletes. The event was won by Bill Carr of the United States, that nation's second consecutive title and sixth overall in the event. Ben Eastman's silver marked the first time countrymen had gone one-two in the event since the United States did it at the first three Olympics.

Athletics at the 1932 Summer Olympics – Mens 400 metres hurdles Olympic athletics event

The men's 400 metres hurdles event at the 1932 Olympic Games took place on July 31 and August 1 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. There were 18 competitors from 13 nations. The 1930 Olympic Congress in Berlin had reduced the limit from 4 athletes per NOC to 3 athletes. The event was won by Bob Tisdall of Ireland, the nation's first medal in the event in its 400 metres hurdles debut. The United States took silver and bronze, extending its streak of taking at least silver in all 7 appearances of the event to that point. Taylor became the first man to earn three medals in the event, adding to his 1924 gold and 1928 bronze. Defending champion David Burghley of Great Britain finished fourth.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki, Finland was held at the Olympic Stadium on 20 and 21 July. Seventy-two athletes from 33 nations competed; each nation was limited to 3 runners. The final was won by American Lindy Remigino, the fourth consecutive victory by a different American. Herb McKenley won Jamaica's first medal in the men's 100 metres with his silver, while McDonald Bailey's bronze put Great Britain on the podium for the first time since 1928. The final was "probably the closest mass finish in Olympic 100 metre history" with the first four runners all clocking in at 10.4 seconds hand-timed, all six finalists within 0.12 seconds electric-timed, and a photo finish necessary to separate the winners.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1968 Olympic Games took place at Estadio Olímpico Universitario in Mexico City, Mexico, on October 13 and 14. Sixty-five athletes from 42 nations took part. Each nation was limited to 3 runners by rules in place since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by American Jim Hines, the second consecutive time the event was won by an American. Jamaica won its first medal in the event since 1952.

Athletics at the 1972 Summer Olympics – Mens 100 metres

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, West Germany, was held at Olympiastadion on 31 August and 1 September. Eighty-five athletes from 55 nations competed. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Valeriy Borzov of the Soviet Union, the first medal in the men's 100 metres for that nation. Jamaican Lennox Miller, silver medalist four years earlier, became the second man to make the podium twice in the event by taking bronze.

Athletics at the 1952 Summer Olympics – Mens 200 metres Olympic athletics event

The men's 200 metres sprint event at the 1952 Olympic Games took place between July 22 and July 23. There were 71 competitors from 35 nations. The maximum number of athletes per nation had been set at 3 since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by American Andy Stanfield. Americans also took silver and bronze as the United States swept the medals in the event for the third time.

Athletics at the 1952 Summer Olympics – Mens 400 metres hurdles Olympic athletics event

The men's 400 metres hurdles event at the 1952 Summer Olympics took place July 20 and July 21 at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium. There were 40 competitors from 24 nations. The maximum number of athletes per nation had been set at 3 since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by American Charles Moore. It was the nation's third consecutive and eighth overall victory in the event. The Soviet Union, in its debut, and New Zealand each earned their first medal in the men's 400 metres hurdles, with Yuriy Lituyev's silver and John Holland's bronze, respectively.

Athletics at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Mens 100 metres

The men's 100 metres event at the 2016 Summer Olympics took place between 13–14 August at the Olympic Stadium. Eighty-four athletes from 57 nations competed.

References

  1. "Athletics at the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 4 June 2017.
  2. Official Report, p. 377.
  3. "Tolan wins by two inches in Olympic 100 meters". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press. August 2, 1932. p. 1.
  4. 1 2 3 4 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  5. Official Report, p. 380.
  6. Official Report, pp. 384–85.
  7. "Friends and rivals". Milwaukee Journal. World Wide photo. August 3, 1932. p. 3, part 2.
  8. Wolf, Bob (July 26, 1984). "Olympic blunder". Milwaukee Journal. p. 3, part 3.
  9. Rice, Grantland (August 2, 1932). "Tolan-Metcalfe race greatest in Olympic history, says Rice". Milwaukee Journal. NANA. p. 4, part 2.