London Films

Last updated
London Films
Industryproduction
Founded1932
FounderAlexander Korda
Headquarters Buckinghamshire

The London Films logo in Laurence Olivier's Richard III (1955). Panscanrichardiiilogo.JPG
The London Films logo in Laurence Olivier's Richard III (1955).

London Films Productions is a British film and television production company founded in 1932 by Alexander Korda and from 1936 based at Denham Film Studios in Buckinghamshire, near London. The company's productions included The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933), Things to Come (1936), Rembrandt (1936), and The Four Feathers (1939). The facility at Denham was taken over in 1939 by Rank and merged with Pinewood to form D & P Studios. The outbreak of war necessitated that The Thief of Bagdad (1940) be completed in California, although Korda's handful of American-made films still displayed Big Ben as their opening corporate logo. [1]

Contents

After a restructuring of Korda's UK operations in the late 1940s, London Films were made at Shepperton. One of these was The Third Man (1949). The company's film The Sound Barrier (1952) won the Academy Award for Best Sound. [2] [1]

More than 40 years after Korda died in January 1956, the company returned to active film-making in 1997 with Morgan Mason as the chief executive. [3]

Filmography

1930s

1940s

1950s

1970s

1980s

1990s

Alexander Korda Films Inc. (USA)

1930s

1940s

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References

  1. 1 2 Kulik, Karol Alexander Korda:The Man Who Could Work Miracles. Virgin Books, 1990. ISBN   9780870003356
  2. "The 25th Academy Awards (1953) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 20 August 2011.
  3. Dawtrey, Adam and Rex Weiner. Mason on top of new London pix Variety. 7 April 1997. Retrieved 25 August 2007. Archived 26 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine