National Film Award for Best Direction

Last updated
National Film Award for Best Direction
Awarded forExcellence in cinematic direction achievement
Sponsored by Directorate of Film Festivals
Formerly calledAward for excellence in direction (1967–1976)
Reward(s)
  • Swarna Kamal (Golden Lotus)
  • 2,50,000
First awarded1967
Last awarded2019
Most recent winner Sanjay Puran Singh Chauhan
Highlights
Total awarded54
First winner Satyajit Ray
Website http://dff.nic.in/NFA.aspx   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

The National Film Award for Best Direction is an honour presented annually at India's National Film Awards ceremony by the Directorate of Film Festivals (DFF), an organisation set up by the Indian Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. [1] Since 1967, the award is given by a national panel appointed annually by the DFF to a director for their work within Indian cinema. [1] It is presented by the president of India at a ceremony held in New Delhi. [1] [2]

Contents

The winner is given a "Swarna Kamal" (Golden Lotus) certificate and a cash prize of 2.5 lakh (US$3,500). [lower-alpha 1] [7] Including ties and repeat winners, the DFF has presented a total of 53 Best Direction awards to 34 different directors. Although Indian cinema produces films in more than twenty languages, [1] the performances of films that have won awards are of nine languages: Bengali (16 awards), Malayalam (13 awards), Hindi (11 awards), Tamil (4 awards), English and Kannada (3 awards each), Marathi (2 awards), Assamese and Punjabi (1 each).

The first recipient was Satyajit Ray, who was honoured at the 15th National Film Awards for directing the Bengali film Chiriyakhana (1967). [8] Ray is also the most frequent recipient, with six wins. [9] Adoor Gopalakrishnan has won 5 awards, which includes his debut Malayalam film Swayamvaram (1972). [10] Mrinal Sen has been awarded four times. He is also the only recipient to win the award for directing films in two different languages: Bengali and Hindi. [11] At the 19th National Film Awards, Girish Karnad and B.V. Karanth shared the award for co-directing the Kannada film Vamsha Vriksha (1972). [12] The most recent recipient is Sanjay Puran Singh Chauhan, who was honoured at the 67th National Film Awards for directing the Hindi film Baahattar Hoorain (2019).

Winners

Satyajit Ray is the most frequent recipient with six wins. Satyajit Ray.jpg
Satyajit Ray is the most frequent recipient with six wins.
Adoor Gopalakrishnan has received the honour five times. Adoor Gopalakrishnan 2.jpg
Adoor Gopalakrishnan has received the honour five times.
Mrinal Sen has been awarded four times. Mrinal-sen.jpg
Mrinal Sen has been awarded four times.
Aparna Sen is the only woman director honored by this award. Aparna Sen.jpg
Aparna Sen is the only woman director honored by this award.
List of award recipients, showing the year, film and language
Year [lower-alpha 2] RecipientFilmLanguageRef
1967
(15th)
Satyajit Ray Chiriyakhana Bengali [13]
1968
(16th)
Satyajit Ray Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne Bengali [14]
1969
(17th)
Mrinal Sen Bhuvan Shome Hindi [15]
1970
(18th)
Satyajit Ray Pratidwandi Bengali [16]
1971
(19th)
B. V. Karanth Vamsha Vriksha Kannada [17]
Girish Karnad
1972
(20th)
Adoor Gopalakrishnan Swayamvaram Malayalam [18]
1973
(21st)
Mani Kaul Duvidha Hindi [19]
1974
(22nd)
Satyajit Ray Sonar Kella Bengali [20]
1975
(23rd)
Satyajit Ray Jana Aranya Bengali [21]
1976
(24th)
P. Lankesh Pallavi Kannada [22]
1977
(25th)
G. Aravindan Kanchana Sita Malayalam [23]
1978
(26th)
G. Aravindan Thampu Malayalam [24]
1979
(27th)
Mrinal Sen Ek Din Pratidin Bengali [25]
1980
(28th)
Mrinal Sen Akaler Shandhaney Bengali [26]
1981
(29th)
Aparna Sen 36 Chowringhee Lane English [27]
1982
(30th)
Utpalendu Chakrabarty Chokh Bengali [28]
1983
(31st)
Mrinal Sen Khandhar Hindi [29]
1984
(32nd)
Adoor Gopalakrishnan Mukhamukham Malayalam [30]
1985
(33rd)
Shyam Benegal Trikal Hindi [31]
1986
(34th)
G. Aravindan Oridathu Malayalam [32]
1987
(35th)
Adoor Gopalakrishnan Anantaram Malayalam [33]
1988
(36th)
Shaji N. Karun Piravi Malayalam [34]
1989
(37th)
Adoor Gopalakrishnan Mathilukal Malayalam [35]
1990
(38th)
Tapan Sinha Ek Doctor Ki Maut Hindi [36]
1991
(39th)
Satyajit Ray Agantuk Bengali [37]
1992
(40th)
Goutom Ghosh Padma Nadir Majhi Bengali [38]
1993
(41st)
T. V. Chandran Ponthan Mada Malayalam [39]
1994
(42nd)
Jahnu Barua Xagoroloi Bohudoor Assamese [40]
1995
(43rd)
Saeed Akhtar Mirza Naseem Hindi [41]
1996
(44th)
Agathiyan Kadhal Kottai Tamil [42]
1997
(45th)
Jayaraj Kaliyattam Malayalam [43]
1998
(46th)
Rajeevnath Janani Malayalam [44]
1999
(47th)
Buddhadeb Dasgupta Uttara Bengali [45]
2000
(48th)
Rituparno Ghosh Utsab Bengali [46]
2001
(49th)
B. Lenin Ooruku Nooruper Tamil [47]
2002
(50th)
Aparna Sen Mr. and Mrs. Iyer English [48]
2003
(51st)
Goutom Ghosh Abar Aranye Bengali [49]
2004
(52nd)
Buddhadeb Dasgupta Swapner Din Bengali [50]
2005
(53rd)
Rahul Dholakia Parzania English [51]
2006
(54th)
Madhur Bhandarkar Traffic Signal Hindi [52]
2007
(55th)
Adoor Gopalakrishnan Naalu Pennungal Malayalam [53]
2008
(56th)
Bala Naan Kadavul Tamil [54]
2009
(57th)
Rituparno Ghosh Abohomaan Bengali [55]
2010
(58th)
Vetrimaaran Aadukalam Tamil [56]
2011
(59th)
Gurvinder Singh Anhe Ghore Da Daan Punjabi [57]
2012
(60th)
Shivaji Lotan Patil Dhag Marathi [58]
2013
(61st)
Hansal Mehta Shahid Hindi [59]
2014
(62nd)
Srijit Mukherji Chotushkone Bengali [60]
2015
(63rd)
Sanjay Leela Bhansali Bajirao Mastani Hindi [61]
2016
(64th)
Rajesh Mapuskar Ventilator Marathi [62]
2017
(65th)
Jayaraj Bhayanakam Malayalam [63]
2018
(66th)
Aditya Dhar Uri: The Surgical Strike Hindi [64]
2019
(67th)
Sanjay Puran Singh Chauhan Bahattar Hoorain Hindi

Footnotes

  1. Before the 54th National Film Awards (2006), the cash prize was 50,000 (US$700), [3] 25,000 (US$350) during the 35th National Film Awards, [4] 20,000 (US$280) from 21st National Film Awards until 34th [5] and 20,000 (US$280) from 1967 to 1972. [6]
  2. Denotes the year in which the film was censored by the Central Board of Film Certification.

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