Dadasaheb Phalke Award

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Dadasaheb Phalke Award
National award for contributions to Indian Cinema
Awarded for"outstanding contribution to the growth and development of Indian cinema"
Sponsored by Directorate of Film Festivals
Reward(s)
  • Swarna Kamal (Golden Lotus)
  • Shawl
  • 1,000,000 (US$14,000)
First awarded1969
Last awarded2021
Most recent winner Rajnikanth
Highlights
Total awarded67
First winner Devika Rani
Website http://dff.nic.in/NFA.aspx   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
Dadasaheb Phalke, often credited as "the father of Indian cinema", made India's first full-length feature Raja Harishchandra (1913). Phalke.jpg
Dadasaheb Phalke, often credited as "the father of Indian cinema", made India's first full-length feature Raja Harishchandra (1913).

The Dadasaheb Phalke Award is India's highest award in the field of cinema. It is presented annually at the National Film Awards ceremony by the Directorate of Film Festivals, an organisation set up by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. The recipient is honoured for their "outstanding contribution to the growth and development of Indian cinema" [1] and is selected by a committee consisting of eminent personalities from the Indian film industry. [2] The award comprises a Swarna Kamal (Golden Lotus) medallion, a shawl, and a cash prize of 1,000,000 (US$14,000). [3]

Contents

Presented first in 1969, the award was introduced by the Government of India to commemorate Dadasaheb Phalke's contribution to Indian cinema. [4] Phalke (1870–1944), who is popularly known as and often regarded as "the father of Indian cinema", was an Indian filmmaker who directed India's first full-length feature film, Raja Harishchandra (1913). [1]

The first recipient of the award was actress Devika Rani, who was honoured at the 17th National Film Awards. As of 2021, there have been 51 awardees. Among those, actor Prithviraj Kapoor (1971) and actor Vinod Khanna (2017) are the only posthumous recipients. [5] Kapoor's actor-filmmaker son, Raj Kapoor, accepted the award on his behalf at the 19th National Film Awards in 1971 and was also himself a recipient in 1987 at the 35th National Film Awards ceremony. [6] [7] [lower-alpha 1] B. N. Reddy (1974) and B. Nagi Reddy (1986); [10] Raj Kapoor (1987) and Shashi Kapoor (2014); [11] Lata Mangeshkar (1989) and Asha Bhosle (2000); [12] B. R. Chopra (1998) and Yash Chopra (2001) are the siblings who have won the award. [13] [14] The most recent recipient of the award is actor Rajnikanth who was honoured at the 67th National Film Awards ceremony.

Recipients

List of award recipients by year [1]
Year
(Ceremony)
ImageRecipientFilm industryNotes
1969
(17th)
Devika Rani in Achhut Kanya (1936).jpg Devika Rani Hindi Widely acknowledged as "the first lady of Indian cinema", [15] the actress debuted in Karma (1933), which was the first Indian English-language film and the first Indian film to feature an on-screen kiss. [16] She also founded the first Indian public limited film company, Bombay Talkies, in 1934. [17]
1970
(18th)
Birendranath Sircar 2013 stamp of India.jpg Birendranath Sircar Bengali The founder of two production companies, International Filmcraft and New Theatres, Sircar is considered to be one of the pioneers of Indian cinema. He also built two cinema theatres in Calcutta, one for screening Bengali films and one for Hindi films. [18]
1971
(19th)
Prithviraj Kapoor in Sinkandar (1941).jpg Prithviraj Kapoor [lower-alpha 2] HindiKapoor began his acting career in theatres and starred in India's first sound film, Alam Ara (1931). He founded Prithvi Theatre, a travelling theatre company in 1944 "to promote Hindi stage productions". [5]
1972
(20th)
Pankaj Mullick.jpg Pankaj Mullick  Bengali
 Hindi
A composer, singer and actor, Mullick began his career providing background music by conducting live orchestras during the screening of silent films. [20] He is best known for Mahishasuramardini, a radio musical composed in 1931. [21]
1973
(21st)
Sulochana Indira M.A. (cropped).jpg Ruby Myers (Sulochana)HindiOne of the highest-paid actresses of her time, Sulochana made her debut with Veer Bala (1925) and is considered to be "the first sex symbol of Indian cinema". [22]
1974
(22nd)
Bommireddy Narasimha Reddy 2008 stamp of India.jpg B. N. Reddy Telugu The director of fifteen feature films in Telugu, Reddy was the first Indian film personality to be honoured with a Doctor of Letters and also the first to receive the Padma Bhushan, the third-highest civilian award in India. [23]
1975
(23rd)
Dhirendranath Ganguly.jpg Dhirendra Nath Ganguly BengaliConsidered one of the founders of Bengali film industry, Ganguly debuted as an actor in Bilat Ferat (1921). He established three production companies – Indo British Film Company (1918), Lotus Film Company (1922) and British Dominion Films Studio (1929) – to direct several Bengali films. [24]
1976
(24th)
Kanan Devi 1937.jpg Kanan Devi BengaliAcknowledged as "the first lady of Bengali cinema", Kanan Devi made her acting debut in silent films in the 1920s. She also sang songs written by Rabindranath Tagore and was a producer with her film company, Shrimati Pictures. [25]
1977
(25th)
Nitin Bose 2013 stamp of India.jpg Nitin Bose  Bengali
 Hindi
A cinematographer, director and screenwriter, Bose is noted for introducing playback singing to Indian cinema in 1935 through his Bengali film Bhagya Chakra and its Hindi remake Dhoop Chhaon . [26] [27]
1978
(26th)
Raichand Boral 2013 stamp of India.jpg Raichand Boral  Bengali
 Hindi
Considered one of the pioneers of Indian film music, Boral was a music director who, in collaboration with director Nitin Bose, introduced the system of playback singing in Indian cinema. [28]
1979
(27th)
Sohrab Modi in Prithvi Vallabh (1943) 1 (cropped).jpg Sohrab Modi HindiAn actor and filmmaker, Modi is credited with bringing Shakespearean classics to Indian cinema and was noted for his delivery of Urdu dialogue. [29]
1980
(28th)
P. Jairaj in Magroor (1950).jpg Paidi Jairaj  Hindi
 Telugu
Initially having worked as a body double, actor-director Jairaj is known for his portrayal of Indian historical characters and was involved in instituting the Filmfare Awards. [30]
1981
(29th)
Naushadsaab1.jpg Naushad HindiMusic director Naushad debuted with Prem Nagar (1940), [31] and is credited with introducing the technique of sound mixing to Indian cinema. [32]
1982
(30th)
LV Prasad 2006 stamp of India.jpg L. V. Prasad  Telugu
  Tamil
 Hindi
Actor-director-producer L. V. Prasad has the distinction of acting in the first talkie films produced in three languages: the Hindi Alam Ara, Tamil Kalidas and Telugu Bhakta Prahlada , all released in 1931. [33] He founded Prasad Studios in 1965 and the Colour Film Laboratory in 1976. [34] Prasad Studios has produced over 150 films in various Indian languages. [35]
1983
(31st)
Durga Khote Amar Jyoti.jpg Durga Khote  Hindi
  Marathi
Having acted in the first Marathi-language talkie Ayodhyecha Raja (1932), Khote is considered a pioneer among women in Indian cinema. [36] She set up two production companies, Fact Films and Durga Khote Productions, which produced short films and documentaries. [37]
1984
(32nd)
SatyajitRay.jpg Satyajit Ray BengaliHaving debuted as a director with Pather Panchali (1955), [38] the filmmaker Ray is credited with bringing world recognition to Indian cinema. [39]
1985
(33rd)
V. Shantaram.jpg V. Shantaram  Hindi
 Marathi
Actor and filmmaker V. Shantaram produced and directed India's first colour film, Sairandhri (1931). [40] He also produced and directed the first Marathi-language talkie, Ayodhyecha Raja (1932), and was associated with nearly 100 films over 50 years. [41]
1986
(34th)
B Nagi Reddy 2018 stamp of India.jpg B. Nagi Reddy TeluguReddy produced more than 50 films, beginning in the 1950s. He established Vijaya Vauhini Studios which was at that time the biggest film studio in Asia. [10]
1987
(35th)
Raj Kapoor In Aah (1953).png Raj Kapoor HindiOften revered as "The Show Man", [42] actor and filmmaker Kapoor's performance in the Hindi film Awara (1951) was ranked as one of the top ten greatest performances of all time by Time magazine in 2010. [43]
1988
(36th)
Ashok Kumar in Kismet1.jpg Ashok Kumar HindiPopularly known as "Dadamoni" (the grand old man), Kumar is noted for his roles in Achhut Kannya (1936), Bandhan (1940) and Kismet (1943), the first blockbuster in Indian cinema. [44]
1989
(37th)
Lata Mangeshkar - still 29065 crop.jpg Lata Mangeshkar  Hindi
 Marathi
Widely credited as the "nightingale of India", [45] playback singer Mangeshkar started her career in the 1942 and has sung songs in over 36 languages. [46]
1990
(38th)
A.Nageswara Rao.jpg Akkineni Nageswara Rao TeluguHaving debuted in Dharma Patni (1941), Akkineni Nageswara Rao acted in more than 250 films, mostly in the Telugu language. [47]
1991
(39th)
Bhalji Pendharkar 2013 stamp of India.jpg Bhalji Pendharkar Marathifilmmaker Pendharkar started his career in the 1920s and produced more than 60 Marathi films and eight Hindi films. He has been widely recognised for the historical and social narratives depicted in these films. [48]
1992
(40th)
Dr. Bhupen Hazarika, Assam, India.jpg Bhupen Hazarika Assamese Popularly referred to as "the Bard of Brahmaputra", musician Hazarika is best known for his folk songs and ballads sung in the Assamese language. [49]
1993
(41st)
Majrooh Sultanpuri 2013 stamp of India.jpg Majrooh Sultanpuri HindiLyricist Sultanpuri penned his first Hindi song for Shahjehan (1946) and wrote around 8000 songs for over 350 Hindi films. [50]
1994
(42nd)
Dilip Kumar 2006.jpg Dilip Kumar HindiDebuting in Jwar Bhata (1944), the "Tragedy King" Dilip Kumar acted in more than 60 Hindi films in a career that spanned over six decades. [51]
1995
(43rd)
Rajkumar 2009 stamp of India.jpg Rajkumar Kannada In a career spanning over 45 years, Rajkumar acted in more than 200 Kannada-language films and also won a National Film Award for Best Male Playback Singer in 1992. [52]
1996
(44th)
Shivaji Ganesan 2001 stamp of India.jpg Sivaji Ganesan TamilGanesan debuted as an actor in Parasakthi (1952) and went on to appear in more than 300 films. Known for his "expressive and resonant voice", [53] Ganesan was the first Indian film actor to win a "Best Actor" award in an International film festival, the Afro-Asian Film Festival held in Cairo, Egypt in 1960. Upon his death, The Los Angeles Times described him as "the Marlon Brando of south India's film industry". [54] [55]
1997
(45th)
Kavi Pradeep 2011 stamp of India.jpg Kavi Pradeep HindiBest known for the patriotic song "Aye Mere Watan Ke Logo", lyricist Pradeep wrote around 1700 songs, hymns and fiery nationalistic poems, including the lyrics for more than 80 Hindi films. [56]
1998
(46th)
B.R.Chopra.jpg B. R. Chopra Hindifilmmaker B. R. Chopra established his own production house, B. R. Films, in 1956, [57] and is best known for the films such as Naya Daur (1957) and Hamraaz (1967), as well as the TV series Mahabharat based on the similarly-titled epic of Hindu literature. [58]
1999
(47th)
Hrishikesh Mukherjee 2013 stamp of India.jpg Hrishikesh Mukherjee HindiHaving directed 45 Hindi films, filmmaker Mukherjee is credited with popularising "middle-of-the-road cinema" through films like Anuradha (1960), Anand (1971) and Gol Maal (1979). [59]
2000
(48th)
Asha Bhosle - still 47160 crop.jpg Asha Bhosle  Hindi
 Marathi
A playback singer of "extraordinary range and versatility", [60] Bhosle began her singing career in 1943.
2001
(49th)
Yash Chopra 2012.jpg Yash Chopra HindiThe founder of Yash Raj Films, Chopra debuted as a director with Dhool Ka Phool (1959). He directed 22 Hindi films. [61]
2002
(50th)
Dev Anand still5.jpg Dev Anand HindiWidely revered as "evergreen star of Hindi cinema", [62] actor and filmmaker Anand co-founded Navketan Films in 1949 and produced 35 films. [63]
2003
(51st)
Mrinal-sen.jpg Mrinal Sen  Bengali
 Hindi
Regarded as one of "India's most important filmmakers", [64] Sen debuted as a director with Raat Bhore (1955) and made 27 films in 50 years. [65]
2004
(52nd)
DirectorAdoor.jpg Adoor Gopalakrishnan Malayalam Credited with pioneering the new wave cinema movement in Malayalam cinema, director Gopalakrishnan won the National Film Award for Best Direction for his debut film, Swayamvaram (1972). He has been acclaimed for his "ability to portray complex problems in a simplistic way". [66]
2005
(53rd)
Shyam Benegal.jpg Shyam Benegal HindiBenegal started his career by making advertising films. He directed his first feature film, Ankur , in 1973. His films have focused on women and their rights. [67]
2006
(54th)
Tapan Sinha 2013 stamp of India.jpg Tapan Sinha  Bengali
 Hindi
filmmaker Sinha debuted as a director in 1954 and made more than 40 feature films in the Bengali, Hindi and Oriya languages. Most of the films addressed problems faced by ordinary people. [68]
2007
(55th)
Manna-dey.jpg Manna Dey  Bengali
 Hindi
In a career spanning over five decades, playback singer Dey sang over 3500 songs in various Indian languages. He is also credited with "pioneering a new genre by infusing Indian classical music in a pop framework". [69]
2008
(56th)
V K Murthy.jpg V. K. Murthy HindiBest known for his collaboration with director Guru Dutt, cinematographer Murthy shot India's first cinemascope film, Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959). [70] He is best remembered for his lighting techniques in Pyaasa (1957) and the "beam shot" in Kaagaz Ke Phool is considered a classic in celluloid history. [71]
2009
(57th)
RamaNaidu.jpg D. Ramanaidu TeluguIn a career spanning over 50 years, D. Ramanaidu produced more than 130 films in various Indian languages but mostly Telugu. [72] He features in The Guinness Book of World Records for having produced films in nine languages. [73]
2010
(58th)
K Balachander.jpg K. Balachander  Tamil
 Telugu
filmmaker K. Balachander debuted as a director with Neerkumizhi (1965). In a career that spanned over forty years, he directed and produced (through his production house, Kavithalayaa Productions, established in 1981) over 100 films in various Indian languages. [74]
2011
(59th)
Soumitra Chatterjee - Kolkata 2011-05-09 2856.JPG Soumitra Chatterjee BengaliBest known for his frequent collaboration with director Satyajit Ray, Chatterjee debuted as an actor in Apur Sansar (1959) and worked with other directors, such as Mrinal Sen and Tapan Sinha, in a career spanning over 60 years. [75] In 1999, he became the first Indian film personality to be conferred with Commandeur at the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, France's highest award for artists, [76] and in 2013, IBN LIVE named him as one of "The men who changed the face of the Indian Cinema". [77]
2012
(60th)
Pran (cropped).jpg Pran HindiKnown for his "compelling and highly stylized performances", actor Pran mainly played villainous characters in Hindi films during a career spanning over 50 years. [78]
2013
(61st)
Gulzar 2008 - still 38227.jpg Gulzar HindiGulzar began his career as a lyricist for Bandini (1963) and debuted as a director with Mere Apne (1971). Known for his successful collaboration with music directors like R. D. Burman and A. R. Rahman, Gulzar won several awards for his lyrics in a career spanning over 50 years. [79] [80]
2014
(62nd)
Shashi Kapoor young.png Shashi Kapoor HindiWinner of two National Film Awards including Best Actor for New Delhi Times in 1985, Kapoor debuted as a child actor at the age of four in the plays directed by his father Prithviraj Kapoor and later as a leading man in the 1961 film Dharmputra . In 1978, Kapoor set up his production house Film "Valas" and played a major role in reviving the Prithvi Theatre group, set up by his father. [11]
2015
(63rd)
Manoj Kumar at Esha Deol's wedding at ISCKON temple 10.jpg Manoj Kumar HindiKnown for his image as the patriotic hero, Kumar debuted as an actor with 1957 Hindi film Fashion. The actor and director of patriotic theme based movies, Kumar is fondly called "Bharat Kumar". [14]
2016
(64th)
The Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Information & Broadcasting, Shri Manish Tewari presenting the Limca Book of Record 'People of the Year'2013 to Dr. K Vishwanath, at a function, in New Delhi on April 10.jpg K. Viswanath TeluguViswanath started his career as a sound recordist. In a film career spanning sixty years, Viswanath has directed fifty three feature films in a variety of genres, including films based on performing arts, visual arts, and aesthetics. Viswanath has garnered five National Film Awards, and has received international recognition for his works. [81] [82]
2017
(65th)
Vinod Khanna at Esha Deol's wedding at ISCKON temple 11 (cropped 2).jpg Vinod Khanna [lower-alpha 3] HindiDebuted in Man Ka Meet (1968), Khanna was primarily known for his work as an actor in Hindi films during the 1970s. [84] He took a brief break from films (1982–1987) and entered politics in 1997. [85]
2018
(66th)
Amitabh.Bachchan.jpg Amitabh Bachchan HindiDebuted in Saat Hindustani , Bachchan is often primarily known for his unique baritone voice and for his excellency in the field of acting. Referred to as the Shahenshah of Bollywood, he has appeared in over 200 Indian films in a career spanning more than five decades. He is regarded as one of the greatest and most influential actors in the history of Indian cinema as well as world cinema, to an extent that the French director François Truffaut called him a "one-man industry".[ citation needed ]
2019
(67th)
Rajinikanth Felicitates Writer Kalaignanam.jpg Rajinikanth TamilDebuted in Apoorva Raagangal (1975), Rajinikanth is an Indian actor who works primarily in Tamil cinema where he is fondly referred to as superstar. In addition to acting, he has also worked as a producer and screenwriter. He was also honored with the Padma Bhushan (2000) and the Padma Vibhushan (2016) by the Government of India. He was awarded for the year 2019, in 2021 due to COVID-19 pandemic. [86]

Similarly named awards

Several other awards and film festivals have been named after Dadasaheb Phalke, sometimes leading to confusion. Such awards include the Dadasaheb Phalke Film Foundation Awards and the Dadasaheb Phalke Excellence Awards, which are unrelated to the award conferred by the Directorate of Film Festivals. Some prominent filmmakers, such as Shyam Benegal, have proposed that the government of India step in to prevent such use of the Dadasaheb Phalke name but the Information and Broadcasting ministry has said that it could not do so since the names of the new awards are not an exact copy. [87]

Explanatory notes

  1. In 1972, Raj Kapoor received the posthumous award given to his father, Prithviraj Kapoor. However, on 1 May 1988, when he was being conferred the award by the then President of India, R. Venkataraman, Kapoor had an asthmatic attack and was rushed in the President's ambulance. Kapoor died a month later on 2 June 1988. [8] [9]
  2. Prithviraj Kapoor died on 29 May 1972, at the age of 65. [19] He was posthumously awarded for the year 1971.
  3. Vinod Khanna died on 27 April 2017, at the age of 70. [83] He was posthumously awarded for the year 2017.

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References

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Bibliography

Further reading