National Film Award for Best Music Direction

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National Film Award for Best Music Direction
National award for contributions to Indian Cinema
The President Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam presenting the Best Music Direction Award for the year 2002 to A. R. RAHMN for the Tamil Film Kannathil Muthamittal for his original musical score highlighting the cultural conflicts and.jpg
A. P. J. Abdul Kalam presenting the Best Music Direction Award for the year 2002 to A.R.Rahman for the Tamil Film Kannathil Muthamittal .
Awarded forBest Music Direction and background score for a feature film of the year
Sponsored by Directorate of Film Festivals
Reward(s)
  • Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
  • 50,000 (US$700)
First awarded1967 (Songs)
1994 (Background Score)
Last awarded2017
Most recent winner D. Imman (Songs)
Prabuddha Banerjee (Background Score)
Highlights
Total awarded53 (Songs)
10 (Background Score)
First winner K. V. Mahadevan
Most number of wins A.R.Rahman (6 wins)

The National Film Award for Best Music Direction (the Silver Lotus Award) is an honour presented annually at the National Film Awards by the Directorate of Film Festivals to a musician who has composed the best score for films produced within the Indian film industry. [1] The award was first introduced at the 15th National Film Awards in 1967. At the 42nd National Film Awards, an award for "Best Background Score" was instituted. It was however discontinued after that, and it was not until 2009 that the category was re-introduced. A total of 51 awards—including award for Best Background score—to 40 different composers.

Contents

Although the Indian film industry produces films in around 20 languages and dialects, [1] the recipients of the award include those who have worked in seven major languages: Hindi (19 awards), Malayalam (9 awards), Tamil (9 awards), Telugu (7 awards), Bengali (7 awards), Kannada (5 awards) and Marathi (2 awards).

The first recipient of the award was K. V. Mahadevan who was honoured for his composition in the Tamil film Kandan Karunai (1967). [2] A. R. Rahman is the most frequent winner having won 6 awards. Jaidev and Vishal Bhardwaj have won it three times each. [3] Four musicians—B. V. Karanth, K.V. Mahadevan, Satyajit Ray and Johnson have won the award twice each. Ilaiyaraaja is the only composer to have won the award for working in three different languages—Telugu, Tamil and Malayalam—while Rahman won the award for performing in two different languages—Tamil and Hindi—including one for his debut film Roja (1992). [4] [lower-alpha 1]

Johnson won the inaugural "Best Background Score" award—for Sukrutham —in 1994. When the award was reinstated in 2009, Ilaiyaraaja won it for the Malayalam film Pazhassi Raja . [7] The most recent recipients are Sanjay Leela Bhansali for Best Score for his work in the Hindi film Padmaavat and Shashwat Sachdev for background Score for his work in the Hindi film Uri: The Surgical Strike , respectively.

Winners

Dagger-14-plain.pngIndicates winner for Best Background Score
List of award recipients, showing the year (award ceremony), film(s), language(s) and citation
YearImageRecipient(s)Film(s)LanguageCitationRefs.
1967
(15th)
K. V. Mahadevan Kandan Karunai Tamil   [8]
1968
(16th)
  Kalyanji Anandji Saraswatichandra Hindi   [9]
1969
(17th)
  S. Mohinder Nanak Nam Jahaz Hai Punjabi   [10]
1970
(18th)
Composer Madan Mohan 2013 stamp of India.jpg Madan Mohan Dastak Hindi   [11]
1971
(19th)
  Jaidev Reshma Aur Shera Hindi  
1972
(20th)
Sachin Dev Burman 2007 stamp of India.jpg Sachin Dev Burman Zindagi Zindagi Hindi   [12]
1973
(21st)
Satyajit Ray in New York (cropped).jpg Satyajit Ray Ashani Sanket Bengali   [13]
1974
(22nd)
  Ananda Shankar Chorus Bengali   [14]
1975
(23rd)
Dr. Bhupen Hazarika, Assam, India.jpg Bhupen Hazarika Chameli Memsaab Assamese   [15]
1976
(24th)
  B. V. Karanth Rishya Shringa Kannada   [16]
1977
(25th)
  B. V. Karanth Ghatashraddha Kannada
For employing the resources of sacred and folk music with unerring skill and sensitivity so as to create an atmosphere of subdued pain and loneliness and to lead the poignant theme to its tragic denouement through the tortured process of its unfolding; for the modulation of effects in terms of sound, covering music in all its variegated range within their span, for heightening the mood in each sequence, almost imperceptibly; for creating art at its concealed best.
[17]
1978
(26th)
  Jaidev Gaman Hindi
For using the traditional light classical and folk music of U.P. to convey the nostalgia of rural migrants lost in a city. Music in Gaman is an integral part of the film.
[18]
1979
(27th)
  K. V. Mahadevan Sankarabharanam Telugu   [19]
1980
(28th)
Satyajit Ray in New York (cropped).jpg Satyajit Ray Hirak Rajar Deshe Bengali
For brilliant experimentation with different forms and modes of Indian music and for creating a mood of fantasy in a pleasing and harmonious style.
[20]
1981
(29th)
Mohammed Zahur Khayyam.jpg Khayyam Umrao Jaan Hindi
For a finely turned score which invokes the spirit of the period and for a felicitous use of music to enrich the central character of the film.
[21]
1982
(30th)
  Ramesh Naidu Meghasandesam Telugu
For his use of classical music to enhance the aesthetic quality of the film.
[22]
1983
(31st)
Ilaiyaraaja BHung.jpg Ilaiyaraaja Saagara Sangamam Telugu
For his lively, rich and vigorous recreation of traditional music composition and inventive musical ideas adapted to the visual demands of drama.
[23]
1984
(32nd)
  Jaidev Ankahee Hindi   [24]
1985
(33rd)
Ilaiyaraaja BHung.jpg Ilaiyaraaja Sindhu Bhairavi Tamil
For innovative bleding of folk and classical music which lends strength and power to the story.
[25]
1986
(34th)
Pandit balamuralikrishna.jpg M. Balamuralikrishna Madhvacharya Kannada
For the effective use of classical music blended with folk music.
[26]
1987
(35th)
  Vanraj Bhatia Tamas Hindi
For creating a thematic score on a heroic scale through melody and complex harmonic arrangements of a symphonic character to stress the human anguish during the holocaust that followed partition, helping greatly in defining the tragic dimensions of the events.
[27]
1988
(36th)
Ilaiyaraaja BHung.jpg Ilaiyaraaja Rudra Veena Telugu
For creating an innovative score which brings out the splendour of classical tradition and blends it beautifully with modern sensitibilities.
[28]
1989
(37th)
 Sher ChoudhuryWosobipo Karbi
For depicting life in interior Assam with a unique background score.
[29]
1990
(38th)
Hridaynath-Mangeshkar-2008.JPG Hridaynath Mangeshkar Lekin... Hindi
For using traditional tunes and instruments creatively, with litting melody and haunting perfection.
[30]
1991
(39th)
  Rajat Dholakia Dharavi Hindi
For using music as an integral part of the film structure, furthering the meaning and dimensions of the theme.
[31]
1992
(40th)
A. R. Rahman.jpg A. R. Rahman Roja [lower-alpha 1] Tamil
For the harmonious blend of western and Carnatic classical music in Roja, the separate music systems complementing each other without losing their own identities.
[32]
1993
(41st)
Johnson (composer).jpg Johnson Ponthan Mada Malayalam
For his music, which exhibits imagination, competence and presentation of the changing contours of music from traditional to modern styles.
[33]
1994
(42nd)
  Ravi
(As Bombay Ravi)
  Sukrutham
  Parinayam
Malayalam
For his melodious rendering of his tunes. The music in both the films exhibit originality and creatively highlights the entire mood of the two films, achieving musical harmony.
[34]
Johnson (composer).jpg Johnson Dagger-14-plain.png Sukrutham Malayalam
For scoring the background music.
1995
(43rd)
Hamsalekha.jpg Hamsalekha Sangeetha Sagara Ganayogi Panchakshara Gavai Kannada
For his authentic utilisation of classical Indian music in both the Hindustani and Karnatic style and presenting a wholesome musical structure to the film.
[35]
1996
(44th)
A. R. Rahman.jpg A. R. Rahman Minsara Kanavu Tamil
For innovative compositions breaking all traditions, entering into new era.
[36]
1997
(45th)
M. M. Keeravani at Inji Iduppazhagi Audio Launch.jpg M. M. Keeravani Annamayya Telugu
For the film's rich, classical music scores and its devotional fervor.
[37]
1998
(46th)
Vishal Bhardwaj 2010 - still 110691 crop.jpg Vishal Bhardwaj Godmother Hindi
For the Hindi film Godmother where the narrative of the film and the music bring about an excellent blend of folk and modern music. It retains the fragrance of the soil of Gujarat.
[38]
1999
(47th)
Ismail Darbar at Vestoria fashion show (19).jpg Ismail Darbar Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam Hindi
For an innovative score that blends in the entire spectrum of Indian music form Classical to folk to embellish the musical narrative.
[39]
2000
(48th)
Anu Malik 2009 - still 88210 crop.jpg Anu Malik Refugee Hindi
For a score that blends with the story and heightens its narrative. A great effort has been made to ensure that the compositions have all the ingredients of the music of the soul.
[40]
2001
(49th)
A. R. Rahman.jpg A. R. Rahman Lagaan Hindi
For a music score, that is both regional in character and popular in appeal bringing out the ethos of Saurashtra region.
[41]
2002
(50th)
A. R. Rahman.jpg A. R. Rahman Kannathil Muthamittal Tamil
For his original musical score highlighting the cultural conflicts and personal anguish in the story.
[42]
2003
(51st)
Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy Raymond Weil.jpg Shankar–Ehsaan–Loy Kal Ho Naa Ho Hindi
For its wide range of styles and modes, enriching the themes of the film.
[43]
2004
(52nd)
VidyaSagar.jpg Vidyasagar Swarabhishekam Telugu
For the songs that are composed as per the situation and enrich the theme of the film. From the beginning to the end he has maintained traditional classical music and used Indian acoustic instruments thus bringing out the colour and flavour of Indian music.
[44]
2005
(53rd)
  Lalgudi Jayaraman Sringaram Tamil
For bringing alive an era of great musical and dance tradition through the deft use of Indian musical instruments.
[45]
2006
(54th)
Ashok Patki.JPG Ashok Patki Antarnad Konkani
For a judicious range of music from the classical to pop, elevating the film.
[46]
2007
(55th)
  Ouseppachan Ore Kadal Malayalam
For achieving through music the poignancy of the turmoil of unconventional love.
[47]
2008
(56th)
Ajay-Atul 1.jpg Ajay-Atul Jogwa Marathi
For its well-researched use of traditional and folk music to reinforce the theme of the film.
[48]
2009
(57th)
Amit Trivedi.jpg Amit Trivedi Dev.D Hindi
For the innovative composition that blend contemporary and folk sounds.
[49]
Ilaiyaraaja BHung.jpg Ilaiyaraaja Dagger-14-plain.png Pazhassi Raja Malayalam
For creating epic grandeur by fusing symphonic orchestration with traditional Indian.
2010
(58th)
Vishal Bhardwaj 2010 - still 110691 crop.jpg Vishal Bhardwaj Ishqiya Hindi
For blending rustic flavour with the Indian classical tradition.
[50]
  Isaac Thomas Kottukapally Dagger-14-plain.png Adaminte Makan Abu Malayalam
For minimalistic use of appropriate background score to nurture the essence of the narrative.
2011
(59th)
Neel Dutt.jpg Neel Dutt Ranjana Ami Ar Ashbona Bengali
For displaying a variety of contemporary musical forms that rock the city of Kolkata today. He virtually drives the narrative flow composing a variety of songs to portray the world of an ageing rock music performer who suffers from a deep feeling of inadequacy. The songs deal with the emotional and social challenges that beset the film's protagonists.
[51]
 Mayookh Bhaumik Dagger-14-plain.png Laptop Bengali
For his original style in narrating the flow of events centred around a laptop. He brings in a new dimension with his unconventional musical renderings, using both live and electronic instruments to counterpoint the urban tragedies that accompany this peripatetic laptop. The music brings in a narrative element that resonates with contemporary problems in Kolkata, a city weighed down by its own contradictions.
2012
(60th)
 Shailendra Barve Samhita Marathi
Versatile and soulful presentation of songs based on Raagas, backed by Indian instrumentation arranged in a manner that enhances the film.
[52]
Bijibal.jpg Bijibal Dagger-14-plain.png Kaliyachan Malayalam
Fusion of native ensemble and percussions in a period setting is a challenge well-met by the background score.
2013
(61st)
Kabir Suman on Khayal.jpg
Kabir Suman Jaatishwar Bengali
The music director has presented a rich variety of musical genres of Bengal with appropriate voices, instruments and orchestration..
[53]
Shantunu moitra.jpg Shantanu Moitra Dagger-14-plain.png Naa Bangaaru Talli Telugu
The music composer has kept a balance of music programming and regional acoustic instruments like Saraswati Veena, Mridangam, Ghatam, Morsing and voices to underline the theme of the film.
2014
(62nd)
Vishal Bhardwaj 2010 - still 110691 crop.jpg Vishal Bhardwaj Haider Hindi
For developing the conflict of the inner and outer landscape through haunting music.
[54]
Gopi Sunder - 16.jpg Gopi Sundar Dagger-14-plain.png 1983 Malayalam
For maintaining the tempo of the film with an in-sync background score.
2015
(63rd)
M-Jayachandran.jpg M. Jayachandran Ennu Ninte Moideen Malayalam
Creating a haunting melodic composition, that resonates the tragic love story
[55]
Ilaiyaraaja BHung.jpg Ilaiyaraaja Dagger-14-plain.png Tharai Thappattai Tamil
For effectively using folk musical instruments and melodies, to give a harmonic layer of meaning to the world of the characters.
2016
(64th)
Bapu Padmanabha 01.JPG Bapu Padmanabha Dagger-14-plain.png Allama Kannada
For adding soul to the film through Carnatic ragas.
[56]
2017
(65th)
A. R. Rahman.jpg A. R. Rahman Dagger-14-plain.png Kaatru Veliyidai Tamil   [57]
Mom Hindi  
2018
(66th)
Sanjay Leela Bhansali Padmaavat Hindi
All the songs lift the mood of the film and give a different dimension to the narrative.
[58]
Shashwat on guitar.jpg Shashwat Sachdev Dagger-14-plain.png Uri: The Surgical Strike Hindi
For providing the right atmosphere for the film.
2019
(67th)
DSC00325 copy-lowres.jpg D. Imman Viswasam Tamil
-Prabuddha Banerjee Dagger-14-plain.png Jyeshthoputro Bengali

Notes

  1. 1 2 The jury of the 40th National Film Awards were tied between Rahman and Ilaiyaraaja—for Thevar Magan —before Balu Mahendra, the chairman voted in favour of Rahman. [5] [6]

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