Ontario Highway 102

Last updated

Ontario 102.svg

Highway 102
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length32.8 km [1] (20.4 mi)
Existed1972 [2] [3] –present
Major junctions
West endOntario 11 crown.svg Ontario 17 crown.svg  Highway 11  / Highway 17 at Sistonens Corners
 Ontario Highway 589.svg  Highway 589Lappe
East endOntario 11.svgOntario 17.svgTrans-Canada Highway shield.svg Highway 11 / Highway 17 / TCH in Thunder Bay
Highway system
Ontario 101.svg Highway 101 Ontario 105.svg Highway 105
Former provincial highways
   Highway 103  Ontario 103.svg 

King's Highway 102, commonly referred to as Highway 102, formerly as Highway 11A and Highway 17A and historically as the Dawson Road , is a provincially maintained highway in the Canadian province of Ontario, serving as a northern bypass to the city of Thunder Bay for all vehicle traffic. Both the western and eastern termini of Highway 102 are with the concurrency of Highway 11 and Highway 17; in the rural community of Sistonens Corners to the west and in Thunder Bay to the east. The majority of Highway 102 is surrounded by thick forests and swamps. However, owing to its historic nature, it is lined with residences outside of urban Thunder Bay.

Contents

Although the road the Highway 102 now follows dates to the 1850s, it did not become a provincial highway until 1937, when it was designated as Highway 17A. Between 1960 and 1971, following the extension of Highway 11 to Rainy River, it was also designated as Highway 11A. By 1972, the route had been renumbered as Highway 102.

Route description

Highway 102 within Thunder Bay Dawson Road Thunder Bay.jpg
Highway 102 within Thunder Bay

Highway 102 passes through terrain typical of northern Ontario highways, including thick boreal forest and muskeg. On a 32.8 km (20.4 mi) eastward journey, the surroundings quickly change from isolated muskeg-ridden foothills to urban development as the highway enters Thunder Bay from the north. Highway 102 provides a shortcut over the Trans-Canada Highway to the south.

Highway 102 begins at Sistonens Corners, immediately south of a Canadian National Railway (CN) overpass, along Highway 11 and Highway 17. A truck stop sits to the west of the intersection. From there, the two-lane road travels east through rolling hills, with muskeg dotting the valleys between the hills. It parallels roughly 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) to the south of the Shebandowan River for 4.5 kilometres (2.8 mi) before crossing both the CN and Canadian Pacific Railway tracks as well as the Kaministiquia River. The highway meets Silver Falls Road, which proceeds north to Silver Falls Provincial Park. The terrain becomes gentler as the route passes several houses while travelling alongside a creek. The highway curves as it meets a power transmission line, which it then parallels. It zig-zags southeast, passing alongside Mud Lake and briefly curving back to the east. Curving back to the southeast, the highway serves several houses before crossing into Thunder Bay at Townline Road and curving to the east. [4]

Within the city limits, the density of residences surrounding the highway rapidly increases as the terrain flattens. The highway intersects Mapleward Road, then diverges from the power transmission lines and curves southeast into suburban Thunder Bay. It meets Secondary Highway 589 after passing the Emerald Greens Golf Course. The route then travels through North McIntyre, formerly a separate community which was annexed. It descends through a wide muskeg, after which it is crossed by several power transmission lines. The highway enters urban Thunder Bay immediately thereafter, where it passes to the west of County Fair Mall before ending at an intersection with the Thunder Bay Expressway. [4] The road which carries Highway 102 continues through Thunder Bay as Red River Road, and was once part of the highway.[ citation needed ]

History

Work on widening the Dawson Road and clearing a new alignment in 1935 Highway 17A construction near Port Arthur, 1935.png
Work on widening the Dawson Road and clearing a new alignment in 1935

Highway 102 was designated by the beginning of 1972, following the route of the former Highway 11A and Highway 17A. Prior to that, the Dawson Road generally followed the present route of the highway.

The history of the Dawson Road began in 1857 when Henry Hind and Simon Dawson were commissioned to survey the territorial claims of the Hudson's Bay Company, as well as to survey a route between Lake Superior and the Red River. A second set of surveys were carried out by Captain John Palliser that same year. The latter recommended avoiding the Kaministiquia River, but ultimately Hind and Dawson's route was chosen. By 1868, the route was blazed between Shebandowan and what would soon be named Prince Arthur's Landing (later changed to Port Arthur). In 1870, the Wolseley Expedition set out from Toronto to end the Red River Rebellion. When Colonel Garnet Wolseley arrived at the present site of Winnipeg, the rebels had fled. However, the expedition resulted in the construction of a road along Dawson's route. [5] It was further improved in 1871. [6]

In 1935, the Department of Northern Development (DND) began construction on a northern bypass of Port Arthur, mostly following the Dawson Road. This road was designated Highway 17A on April 1, 1937, when the DND merged into the Department of Highways. [7] [8] In 1959, Highway 120 was renumbered as Highway 11, and a 180-kilometre (110 mi) concurrency with Highway 17 between Shabaqua Corners and Nipigon was created to join the discontinuous segments. As the northern bypass of Port Arthur now formed an alternate route to both Highway 11 and 17, it was codesignated as Highway 11A and 17A. [9]

Between January 1971 and 1972, Highway 11A and Highway 17A were redesignated as Highway 102. [2] [3] Work began shortly thereafter to realign several sections of the highway with dangerous curves and steep grades approaching the Kaministiquia River; the highway opened in 1975, featuring a new bridge over the river.[ citation needed ]

Major intersections

The following table lists the major junctions along Highway 102, as noted by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario. [1] The entire route is located in Thunder Bay District. [4] [10]  

Locationkm [1] miDestinationsNotes
Sistonens Corners0.00.0Ontario 11 crown.svg Ontario 17 crown.svg  Highway 11  / Highway 17Shabaqua Corners Trans-Canada Highway
Kaministiquia 4.93.0Silver Falls RoadTo Silver Falls Provincial Park and Highway 591
Thunder Bay 22.614.0Mapleward Road
26.016.2End of Thunder Bay jurisdiction over highway [1]
26.216.3Ontario Highway 589.svg  Highway 589 (Dog Lake Road) – Lappe
32.720.3Beginning of Thunder Bay jurisdiction over highway [1]
32.820.4Ontario 11 crown.svg Ontario 17 crown.svg  Highway 11  / Highway 17 (Thunder Bay Expressway) – Nipigon Trans-Canada Highway; continues towards Lake Superior as Red River Road
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Related Research Articles

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Matawin River (Ontario)

The Matawin River is a river in Thunder Bay District in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. It is in the Great Lakes Basin and is a right tributary of the Kaministiquia River.

Shebandowan River

The Shebandowan River is a river in Thunder Bay District in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. It is in the Great Lakes Basin and is a left tributary of the Matawin River. Three-quarters of the length of the river valley is paralleled by Ontario Highway 11, at this point part of the Trans-Canada Highway; and the entire length of the river valley is paralleled by a Canadian National Railway main line, built originally as the Canadian Northern Railway transcontinental main line.

Oskondaga River

The Oskondaga River is a river in Thunder Bay District in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. It is in the Great Lakes Basin and is a left tributary of the Shebandowan River. The river valley is paralleled by Ontario Highway 17, at this point part of the Trans-Canada Highway; and by both the Canadian Pacific Railway transcontinental main line, still in operation, and the Canadian National Railway Graham Subdivision main line, originally built as part of the National Transcontinental Railway, now abandoned.

Shebandowan Lakes

Shebandowan Lakes is the name for the combined entity of three lakes — Upper Shebandowan Lake at the west, Middle Shebandowan Lake at the centre, and Lower Shebandowan Lake at the east — in the Unorganized Part of Thunder Bay District in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. The lakes are in the Great Lakes Basin, and Lower Shebandowan Lake is the source of the Shebandowan River.

Swamp River (Ontario)

The Swamp River is a river in Thunder Bay District in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. It is in the Great Lakes Basin and is a tributary of Shebandowan Lakes.

References

Sources
  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (2016). "Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) counts" . Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  2. 1 2 Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by Photogrammetry Office. Ontario Department of Highways. 1971. § L6.
  3. 1 2 Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by Photogrammetry Office. Department of Transportation and Communications. 1972. § L6.
  4. 1 2 3 Ontario Back Road Atlas (Map). Cartography by MapArt. Peter Heiler Ltd. 2010. p. 107. § HJ8. ISBN   978-1-55198-226-7.
  5. Bolz 1999, pp. 810.
  6. Wilkins 1998, p. 69.
  7. Shragge & Bagnato 1984, p. 71.
  8. Ontario Official Government Road Map (Map). Department of Highways. 1938–39. § E12–F13.
  9. Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by C.P. Robins. Ontario Department of Highways. 1960. § H13–G14.
  10. Minutillo, Carmine (2005). Backroad Mapbook Northwestern Ontario. Mussio Ventures. pp. 5–6, 15. ISBN   978-1-897225-05-9.
Bibliography

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