Thomas Youngs House

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Thomas Youngs House

Thomas Youngs House.jpg

Thomas Youngs House, October 2012
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Location 50 Mitchell Rd., Pittsford, New York
Coordinates 43°5′0″N77°30′17″W / 43.08333°N 77.50472°W / 43.08333; -77.50472 Coordinates: 43°5′0″N77°30′17″W / 43.08333°N 77.50472°W / 43.08333; -77.50472
Area 9.1 acres (3.7 ha)
Built 1818
Architectural style Federal
NRHP reference # 93000546 [1]
Added to NRHP June 24, 1993

Thomas Youngs House is a historic home located at Pittsford in Monroe County, New York. It was originally built in 1818 as a 1 12-story frame dwelling. It was substantially enlarged in 1830 with the addition of a 2 12-story, Federal-style gable-roofed main block. The structure was moved to its present location in 1982; it was originally located 22 miles east on New York State Route 21 in the town of Marion, in Wayne County, New York. [2]

Pittsford (village), New York Village in New York, United States

Pittsford is a village in Monroe County, New York, United States. The population was 1,355 at the 2010 census. It is named after Pittsford, Vermont, the native town of a founding father.

Monroe County, New York County in the United States

Monroe County is a county in the western portion of the state of New York, in the United States. The county is along Lake Ontario's southern shore. As of 2017, Monroe County's population was 747,642. Its county seat is the city of Rochester. The county is named after James Monroe, the fifth President of the United States. Monroe County is part of the Rochester, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Federal architecture architectural style

Federal-style architecture is the name for the classicizing architecture built in the newly founded United States between c. 1780 and 1830, and particularly from 1785 to 1815. This style shares its name with its era, the Federalist Era. The name Federal style is also used in association with furniture design in the United States of the same time period. The style broadly corresponds to the classicism of Biedermeier style in the German-speaking lands, Regency architecture in Britain and to the French Empire style.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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