Timeline of Baghdad

Last updated

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Baghdad, Iraq.

Contents

  1. 2000 BCE – Babylonian city of Baghdadu in existence (approximate date). [1]
  2. 762 CE
  3. 767 – Al-Mansur Mosque built. [4]
  4. 775 – Bab al-Taq (gate) built. [5]
  5. 786 – Harun al-Rashid in power. [6]
  6. 794 – Paper mill in operation. [6] [7]
  7. 799 – Mashhad al-Kazimiyya built. [4]
  8. 812-813 Siege of Baghdad, Fourth Fitna (Islamic Civil War)
  9. 814 – City captured by al-Ma'mun. [6]
  10. 827 – Tomb of Zobeide built. [8]
  11. 836 – Abbasid Caliphate of Al-Mu'tasim relocated from Baghdad to Samarra. [9]
  12. 850 – Book of Ingenious Devices published. [10]
  13. 855 – Funeral of Ahmad ibn Hanbal. [11]
  14. 861 – 11 December: Caliph Al-Mutawakkil assassinated. [6]
  15. 865 – City wall built. [12]
  16. 865-866 Caliphal Civil War, was an armed conflict during the "Anarchy at Samarra" between the rival caliphs al-Musta'in and al-Mu'tazz.
  17. 892 – Abbasid Caliphate of Al-Mu'tamid relocated to Baghdad from Samarra. [9]
  18. 901 – Jami al-Qasr (mosque) built. [13]
  19. 908 – Khulafa Mosque built. [4]
  20. 946 – Battle of Baghdad; Shia Buyids in power. [9]
  21. 993 – Dar al-'Ilm (educational institution) founded. [14]
  22. 1055 – Seljuq Nizam al-Mulk in power. [6]
  23. 1060 – Dar al-Kutub (library) founded. [14]
  24. 1066 – Abu Hanifa Mosque restored.[ citation needed ]
  25. 1067 – Al-Nizamiyya of Baghdad (college) established. [9] [15]
  26. 1095 – City wall rebuilt. [12]
  27. 1157 - Siege of Baghdad, Abbasid–Seljuq Wars
  28. 1180 – Caliph Al-Nasir in power.
  29. 1193 – Jami' Zumurrud Khatun (mosque) and Turbat Zumurrud Khatun (tomb) built. [4]
  30. 1202 – Minaret of Jami' al-Khaffafin built (approximate date). [4]
  31. 1215 – Tomb of Maruf el-Kerkhi built. [8]
  32. 1221 – Bab al-Talsim (Talisman gate) built. [4]
  33. 1226 - al-Baghdadi compiles Kitab al-Tabikh (1226)  [ ar ] (cookbook).
  34. 1228 – Jami' al-Qumriyya Mosque built. [4]
  35. 1230 – Al-Qasr al-Abbasi fi al-Qal'a built (approximate date). [4]
  36. 1232 – Mustansiriya Madrasah established. [4] [13]
  37. 1252 – Shrine of Abdul-Kadir built. [8]
  38. 1258 – January–February: City destroyed by forces of Mongol Hulagu Khan during the Siege of Baghdad; most of population killed. [9] [1]
  39. 1272 – Marco Polo visits city (approximate date). [9]
  40. 1326 – Ibn Battuta visits city. [16]
  41. 1357 – Al-Madrasah al-Mirjaniyya built. [4]
  42. 1358 – Khan al-Mirjan built. [4]
  43. 1393 – City captured by Timur. [9]
  44. 1401 – City captured by Timur again. [9] [1]
  45. 1405 – Sultan Ahmed Jalayir in power. [9]
  46. 1417 – City taken by Qara Yusuf. [8]
  47. 1468 – Aq Qoyunlu in power. [6]

16th–19th centuries

  1. 1508 - City taken by Persian Ismail I. [17]
  2. 1534
  3. 1535 – City becomes capital of the Baghdad Eyalet of the Ottoman Empire.
  4. 1544 – City taken by forces of Suleiman I. [8]
  5. 1578 – Jami' Murad Basha built. [4]
  6. 1601 – Coffeehouse built. [18]
  7. 1602 – City taken by forces of Abbas I of Persia. [8] [1]
  8. 1623 – 23 January: Capture of Baghdad by Safavids. [9] [1]
  9. 1625 - Siege of Baghdad, Ottoman–Safavid Wars
  10. 1638 – Capture of Baghdad by forces of Ottoman Murad IV. [19]
  11. 1682 – Khaseki mosque built. [1]
  12. 1683 – City besieged. [9]
  13. 1780 – Mamluk Sulayman Pasha the Great in power. [9]
  14. 1795 – Jami al-Maydan built. [4]
  15. 1799 – City besieged by Wahhabi-Saudi forces. [9]
  16. 1816 – Mamluk Dawud Pasha in power. [9]
  17. 1823 – Population: 80,000 (estimate). [20]
  18. 1826 – Jami' Haydar Khanah built. [4]
  19. 1830
  20. 1831 – Flood, then famine. [9]
  21. 1841 – Lynch Brothers in business. [22]
  22. 1848 – Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baghdad established.
  23. 1849 – Remnants discovered of quay of Nebuchadrezzar, from Babylonian city of Baghdadu. [1]
  24. 1861 – Istanbul-Baghdad telegraph line installed. [23]
  25. 1865
  26. 1869 – Midhat Pasha in power. [9]
  27. 1870
    • Municipal council established. [9]
    • City walls demolished. [13]
  28. 1871 – Population: 65,000. [21]
  29. 1880 – Turkish camel post begins operating (approximate date). [1]
  30. 1895 – Population: 100,000 (estimate). [8]
  31. 1899 – Alliance Israélite girls' school established. [1]

20th century

1900s–1940s

  1. 1908 – Population: 140,000 (estimate). [24]
  2. 1909 – Cinema built. [25]
  3. 1911 – Ottoman XIII Corps headquartered in Baghdad.
  4. 1912 – Population: 200,000 (estimate). [26]
  5. 1914 – October: Samarra-Baghdad railway begins operating. [9]
  6. 1915
  7. 1917
  1. 1919 – Guardians of Independence organized.
  2. 1920
  3. 1926 – Baghdad Antiquities Museum founded.
  4. 1927 – British Imperial Airways begins operating Cairo-Baghdad-Basrah flights. [9]
  5. 1929 – Al-Maktabatil Aammah (public library) active.
  6. 1931 – Strike. [30]
  7. 1936 – Military coup. [9]
  8. 1940 – Iraqi Music Institute inaugurated. [31]
  9. 1941 - Iraqi coup d'état in Baghdad, World War II
  10. 1941
  11. 1944 – Baghdad Symphony Orchestra founded.
  12. 1946 – Al-Sarafiya bridge built.
  13. 1947 - Population: 352,137. [33]
  14. 1948
    • Uprising. [9]
    • Popular Theatre Company [31] and filmmaking Studio of Baghdad formed. [25]

22. 1948 - Jewish exodus from Arab and Muslim countries

1950s–1990s

  1. 1952
    • Uprising. [9]
    • Modern Theatre Company formed. [31]
  2. 1953 – Baghdad Central Station built.
  3. 1956
    • Samarra Barrage constructed on the Tigris River near the city. [34]
    • May: Government television begins broadcasting. [35]
    • Uprising. [36]
    • Iraqi Artists Society formed. [37]
  4. 1957
  5. 1958
  6. 1959
  7. 1960 – September: OPEC founded at Baghdad Conference (Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela).
  8. 1961 – Iraq National Library and Archive established.
  9. 1963
  10. 1964 – Al-Yarmouk Teaching Hospital established.
  11. 1965 - Population: 1,490,759 city; 1,657,424 urban agglomeration. [38]
  12. 1966
  13. 1967 – Firqat Ittahaad al-Fannaaneed theatre group formed. [31]
  14. 1968 – National Theatre Company established. [31]
  15. 1970 - Population: 1,984,142 (estimate). [40]
  16. 1971 – Baghdad Zoo opens.
  17. 1975 – Central Post Office built. [4]
  18. 1978 – November: Arab League summit.
  19. 1980
  20. 1981 – National Film Center and Saddam Hussein Gymnasium (now Baghdad Gymnasium) built. [4]
  21. 1982
  22. 1983 – Al-Shaheed Monument built. [4]
  23. 1985
    • Baghdad Festival of Arab theatre begins. [31]
    • Amanat Al Assima Housing complex and Central Bank of Iraq building constructed. [4]
  24. 1987 - Population: 3,841,268. [41]
  25. 1988 – Saddam University established.
  26. 1989 – Victory Arch erected. [34]
  27. 1991
  28. 1993 – 26 June: Missile strikes by United States.
  29. 1994 – Baghdad Tower constructed.

21st century

2000s

2010s

2020s

See also

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33°19′30″N44°25′19″E / 33.325°N 44.422°E / 33.325; 44.422