United States District Court for the District of Nevada

Last updated
United States District Court for the District of Nevada
(D. Nev.)
UnitedStatesDistrictCourtDistrictNevada.png
Map of USA NV.svg
Location Las Vegas
More locations
Appeals to Ninth Circuit
EstablishedFebruary 27, 1865
Judges7
Chief Judge Miranda Du
Officers of the court
U.S. Attorney Christopher Chiou (acting)
U.S. Marshal Gary G. Schofield
www.nvd.uscourts.gov

The United States District Court for the District of Nevada (in case citations, D. Nev.) is the federal district court whose jurisdiction is the state of Nevada. The court has locations in Las Vegas and Reno.

Contents

Cases from the District of Nevada are appealed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit).

The United States Attorney's Office for the District of Nevada represents the United States in civil and criminal litigation in the court. As of March 1,2021 the Acting United States Attorney is Christopher Chiou.

Current judges

As of October 7,2020:

#TitleJudgeDuty stationBornTerm of serviceAppointed by
Active Chief Senior
25Chief Judge Miranda Du Reno 19692012–present2019–present Obama
24District Judge Gloria Navarro Las Vegas 19672010–present2014–2019 Obama
26District Judge Andrew P. Gordon Las Vegas 19622013–present Obama
27District Judge Jennifer A. Dorsey Las Vegas 19712013–present Obama
28District Judge Richard Boulware Las Vegas 19682014–present Obama
29District Judgevacant
30District Judgevacant
14Senior Judge Howard D. McKibben Reno 19401984–20051997–20022005–present Reagan
18Senior Judge Roger L. Hunt inactive19422000–20112007–20112011–present Clinton
19Senior Judge Kent Dawson Las Vegas 19442000–20122012–present Clinton
20Senior Judge Larry R. Hicks Reno 19432001–20122012–present G.W. Bush
21Senior Judge James C. Mahan Las Vegas 19432002–20182018–present G.W. Bush
22Senior Judge Robert Clive Jones Reno 19472003–20162011–20142016–present G.W. Bush

Vacancies and pending nominations

SeatPrior judge's duty stationSeat last held byVacancy reasonDate of vacancyNomineeDate of nomination
4 Reno Robert Clive Jones Senior status February 1, 2016
8 Las Vegas James C. Mahan June 29, 2018

Former judges

#JudgeStateBorn–diedActive service Chief Judge Senior status Appointed byReason for
termination
1 Alexander White Baldwin NV 1835–18691865–1869 Lincoln death
2 Edgar Winters Hillyer NV 1830–18821869–1882 Grant death
3 George Myron Sabin NV 1833–18901882–1890 Arthur death
4 Thomas Porter Hawley NV 1830–19071890–1906 B. Harrison retirement
5 Edward Silsby Farrington NV 1856–19291907–19281928–1929 T. Roosevelt death
6 Frank Herbert Norcross NV 1869–19521928–19451945–1952 Coolidge death
7 Roger Thomas Foley NV 1886–19741945–19571954–19571957–1974 Truman [Note 1] death
8 John Rolly Ross NV 1899–19631954–19631961–1963 Eisenhower death
9 Roger D. Foley NV 1917–19961962–19821963–19801982–1996 Kennedy death
10 Bruce Rutherford Thompson NV 1911–19921963–19781978–1992 Kennedy death
11 Harry E. Claiborne NV 1917–20041978–19861980–1986 Carter impeachment and conviction
12 Edward Cornelius Reed Jr. NV 1924–20131979–19921986–19921992–2013 Carter death
13 Lloyd D. George NV 1930–20201984–19971992–19971997–2020 Reagan death
15 Philip Martin Pro NV 1946–present1987–20112002–20072011–2015 Reagan retirement
16 David Warner Hagen NV 1931–present1993–20032003–2005 Clinton retirement
17 Johnnie B. Rawlinson NV 1952–present1998–2000 Clinton elevation to 9th Cir.
23 Brian Sandoval NV 1963–present2005–2009 G.W. Bush resignation
  1. Judge Foley was nominated by President Roosevelt but was appointed to the Court by (i.e., received his commission from) President Truman.

Chief judges

Chief judges have administrative responsibilities with respect to their district court. Unlike the Supreme Court, where one justice is specifically nominated to be chief, the office of chief judge rotates among the district court judges. To be chief, a judge must have been in active service on the court for at least one year, be under the age of 65, and have not previously served as chief judge. A vacancy is filled by the judge highest in seniority among the group of qualified judges. The chief judge serves for a term of seven years or until age 70, whichever occurs first. The age restrictions are waived if no members of the court would otherwise be qualified for the position.

When the office was created in 1948, the chief judge was the longest-serving judge who had not elected to retire on what has since 1958 been known as senior status or declined to serve as chief judge. After August 6, 1959, judges could not become or remain chief after turning 70 years old. The current rules have been in operation since October 1, 1982.

Succession of seats

Courthouses

The Lloyd D. George Federal District Courthouse in Las Vegas. Lasvegascourthouse.jpg
The Lloyd D. George Federal District Courthouse in Las Vegas.

Las Vegas

Coordinates: 36°09′54″N115°08′34″W / 36.16510°N 115.14270°W / 36.16510; -115.14270 The Lloyd D. George Federal District Courthouse is the home for the district court in Las Vegas. The building of the courthouse was completed in 2002 and was the first federal building built to comply with the post-Oklahoma City blast resistance requirements. Blast-resistance tests for the project were conducted at the Department of Defense’s Large Blast Thermal Simulator in White Sands, New Mexico to validate building performance under blast loads. [1]

On January 4, 2010, a single gunman, identified as Johnny Lee Wicks, aged 66, went inside the lobby of the courthouse and opened fire, fatally wounding a security officer before being killed himself by return fire from other security officers and U.S. Marshals. Senators Harry Reid and John Ensign, both of whom had offices in the courthouse building, were not present when this happened. Wicks was apparently angry over the outcome of a legal dispute over his Social Security benefits. [2] [3]

Reno

The Bruce R. Thompson Courthouse and Federal Building was completed in 1996. The building's primary tenants are the U.S. District Court, U.S. Marshals Service, U.S. Probation and Pretrial Services, Nevada Senators, and the Corporation for National Community Services. [4]

See also

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References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 16, 2013. Retrieved July 23, 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. "Court officer killed, marshal wounded in shooting inside Las Vegas courthouse".
  3. "Courthouse gunman had history of brushes with law". January 5, 2010.
  4. "Building Information". www.gsa.gov.