United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit

Last updated
United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit
(11th Cir.)
US-CourtOfAppeals-11thCircuit-Seal.png
11th Circuit map.svg
Location Elbert P. Tuttle U.S. Court of Appeals Building
Appeals from
EstablishedOctober 1, 1981
Judges12
Circuit Justice Clarence Thomas
Chief Judge William H. Pryor Jr.
www.ca11.uscourts.gov

The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit (in case citations, 11th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

Contents

These districts were originally part of the Fifth Circuit, but were split off to form the Eleventh Circuit effective October 1, 1981. [1] For this reason, Fifth Circuit decisions from before this split are considered binding precedent in the Eleventh Circuit. [2] [3]

The court is based at the Elbert P. Tuttle U.S. Court of Appeals Building in Atlanta, Georgia. The building is named for Elbert Tuttle, who served as Chief Judge of the Fifth Circuit in the 1960s and was known for issuing decisions which advanced the civil rights of African-Americans.

The Eleventh Circuit is one of the thirteen United States courts of appeals.

Current composition of the court

As of March 3,2021:

#TitleJudgeDuty stationBornTerm of serviceAppointed by
Active Chief Senior
29Chief Judge William H. Pryor Jr. Birmingham, AL 19622004–present [Note 1] 2020–present G.W. Bush
28Circuit Judge Charles R. Wilson Tampa, FL 19541999–present Clinton
30Circuit Judge Beverly B. Martin Atlanta, GA 19552010–present Obama
31Circuit Judge Adalberto Jordan Miami, FL 19612012–present Obama
32Circuit Judge Robin S. Rosenbaum Fort Lauderdale, FL 19662014–present Obama
34Circuit Judge Jill A. Pryor Atlanta, GA 19632014–present Obama
35Circuit Judge Kevin Newsom Birmingham, AL 19722017–present Trump
36Circuit Judge Elizabeth L. Branch Atlanta, GA 19682018–present Trump
37Circuit Judge Britt Grant Atlanta, GA 19782018–present Trump
38Circuit Judge Robert J. Luck Tallahassee, FL 19792019–present Trump
39Circuit Judge Barbara Lagoa Miami, FL 19672019–present Trump
40Circuit Judge Andrew L. Brasher Birmingham, AL 19812020–present Trump
9Senior Circuit Judge Gerald Bard Tjoflat Jacksonville, FL 19291981–2019 [Note 2] 1989–19962019–present Ford / Operation of law
15Senior Circuit Judge R. Lanier Anderson III Macon, GA 19361981–2009 [Note 2] 1999–20022009–present Carter / Operation of law
19Senior Circuit Judge James Larry Edmondson Jasper, GA 19471986–20122002–20092012–present Reagan
22Senior Circuit Judge Joel Fredrick Dubina Montgomery, AL 19471990–20132009–20132013–present G.H.W. Bush
23Senior Circuit Judge Susan H. Black Jacksonville, FL 19431992–20112011–present G.H.W. Bush
24Senior Circuit Judge Edward Earl Carnes Montgomery, AL 19501992–20202013–20202020–present G.H.W. Bush
26Senior Circuit Judge Frank M. Hull Atlanta, GA 19481997–20172017–present Clinton
27Senior Circuit Judge Stanley Marcus West Palm Beach, FL 19461997–20192019–present Clinton
33Senior Circuit Judge Julie E. Carnes Atlanta, GA 19502014–20182018–present Obama
  1. Recess appointment; formally nominated on April 9, 2003, given a recess appointment on February 20, 2004, confirmed by the United States Senate on June 9, 2005, and received commission on June 10, 2005
  2. 1 2 Reassigned from the 5th Circuit.

Vacancies and pending nominations

SeatPrior Judge's Duty StationSeat last held byVacancy reasonDate of vacancyNomineeDate of nomination
9 Atlanta Beverly B. Martin RetirementSeptember 30, 2021 [4]

List of former judges

#JudgeStateBorn–diedActive service Chief Judge Senior status Appointed byReason for
termination
1 Richard Rives AL 1895–19821981–1982 [Note 1] Truman / Operation of law death
2 Elbert Tuttle GA 1897–19961981–1996 [Note 1] Eisenhower / Operation of law death
3 Warren Leroy Jones FL 1895–19931981–1993 [Note 1] Eisenhower / Operation of law death
4 John Cooper Godbold AL 1920–20091981–1987 [Note 1] 1981–19861987–2009 L. Johnson / Operation of law death
5 David William Dyer FL 1910–19981981–1998 [Note 1] L. Johnson / Operation of law death
6 John Milton Bryan Simpson FL 1903–19871981–1987 [Note 1] L. Johnson / Operation of law death
7 Lewis Render Morgan GA 1913–20011981–2001 [Note 1] L. Johnson / Operation of law death
8 Paul Hitch Roney FL 1921–20061981–1989 [Note 1] 1986–19891989–2006 Nixon / Operation of law death
10 James Clinkscales Hill FL 1924–20171981–1989 [Note 1] 1989–2017 Ford / Operation of law death
11 Peter T. Fay FL 1929–20211981–1994 [Note 1] 1994–2021 Ford / Operation of law death
12 Robert Smith Vance AL 1931–19891981–1989 [Note 1] Carter / Operation of law death
13 Phyllis A. Kravitch GA 1920–20171981–1996 [Note 1] 1996–2017 Carter / Operation of law death
14 Frank Minis Johnson AL 1918–19991981–1991 [Note 1] 1991–1999 Carter / Operation of law death
16 Joseph W. Hatchett FL 1932–20211981–1999 [Note 1] 1996–1999 Carter / Operation of law retirement
17 Albert John Henderson GA 1920–19991981–1986 [Note 1] 1986–1999 Carter / Operation of law death
18 Thomas Alonzo Clark GA 1920–20051981–1991 [Note 1] 1991–2005 Carter / Operation of law death
20 Emmett Ripley Cox AL 1935–20211988–20002000–2021 Reagan death
21 Stanley F. Birch Jr. GA 1945–present1990–2010 G.H.W. Bush retirement
25 Rosemary Barkett FL 1939–present1994–2013 Clinton retirement

Chief judges

Chief Judge
Godbold 1981–1986
Roney 1986–1989
Tjoflat 1989–1996
Hatchett 1996–1999
Anderson 1999–2002
Edmondson 2002–2009
Dubina 2009–2013
E. Carnes 2013–2020
W. Pryor, Jr. 2020–present

Chief judges have administrative responsibilities with respect to their circuits, and preside over any panel on which they serve unless the circuit justice (i.e., the Supreme Court justice responsible for the circuit) is also on the panel. Unlike the Supreme Court, where one justice is specifically nominated to be chief, the office of chief judge rotates among the circuit judges. To be chief, a judge must have been in active service on the court for at least one year, be under the age of 65, and have not previously served as chief judge. A vacancy is filled by the judge highest in seniority among the group of qualified judges. The chief judge serves for a term of seven years or until age 70, whichever occurs first. The age restrictions are waived if no members of the court would otherwise be qualified for the position.

When the office was created in 1948, the chief judge was the longest-serving judge who had not elected to retire on what has since 1958 been known as senior status or declined to serve as chief judge. After August 6, 1959, judges could not become or remain chief after turning 70 years old. The current rules have been in operation since October 1, 1982.

Succession of seats

The court has twelve seats for active judges, numbered in the order in which they were initially filled. Judges who assume senior status enter a kind of retirement in which they remain on the bench, while vacating their seats, thus allowing the president to appoint new judges to fill their seats.

See also

Notes

  1. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals Reorganization Act of 1980, Pub.L.   96–452 , 94  Stat.   1994 , enacted October 14, 1980
  2. Bonner v. City of Prichard , 661 F.2d 1206 (11th Cir. 1981).
  3. Stein v. Reynolds Secs., Inc. , 667 F.2d 33 (11th Cir. 1982).
  4. Future Judicial Vacancies

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