2006 Pacific hurricane season

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2006 Pacific hurricane season
2006 Pacific hurricane season summary map.png
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedMay 27, 2006
Last system dissipatedNovember 20, 2006
Strongest storm
Name Ioke
(Most intense hurricane in the Central Pacific)
  Maximum winds160 mph (260 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
  Lowest pressure915 mbar (hPa; 27.02 inHg)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions25, 1 unofficial
Total storms19, 1 unofficial
Hurricanes11
Major hurricanes
(Cat. 3+)
6
Total fatalities14 total
Total damage$355.1 million (2006 USD)
Related articles
Pacific hurricane seasons
2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008

The 2006 Pacific hurricane season was the most active since 2000, producing 19  tropical storms or hurricanes. [1] Eighteen developed within the National Hurricane Center (NHC) area of warning responsibility, which is east of 140°W, and one storm formed between 140°W and the International Date Line, which is under the jurisdiction of the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC). Of the 19 total storms, eleven became hurricanes, of which six attained major hurricane status. Within the NHC portion of the basin, the season officially began on May 15, and in the CPHC portion, it started on June 1; the season officially ended on November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific basin.

2000 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2000 Pacific hurricane season was an above-average Pacific hurricane season, although most of the storms were weak and short-lived. There were few notable storms this year. Tropical Storms Miriam, Norman, and Rosa all made landfall in Mexico with minimal impact. Hurricane Daniel briefly threatened the U.S. state of Hawaii while weakening. Hurricane Carlotta was the strongest storm of the year and the second-strongest June hurricane in recorded history. Carlotta killed 18 people when it sank a freighter. Overall, the season was significantly more active than the previous season, with 19 tropical storms. In addition, six hurricanes developed. Furthermore, there were total of two major hurricanes, Category 3 or greater on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale.

Tropical cyclone Is a rotating storm system

A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane, typhoon, tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, and simply cyclone. A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, and a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean; in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean, comparable storms are referred to simply as "tropical cyclones" or "severe cyclonic storms".

National Hurricane Center Division of the United States National Weather Service

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) is the division of the United States' National Weather Service responsible for tracking and predicting tropical weather systems between the Prime Meridian and the 140th meridian west poleward to the 30th parallel north in the northeast Pacific Ocean and the 31st parallel north in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The agency, which is co-located with the Miami branch of the National Weather Service, is situated on the campus of Florida International University in University Park, Florida.

Contents

The strongest storm of the season was Hurricane Ioke, which reached Category 5 status on the Saffir-Simpson scale in the central Pacific Ocean; Ioke passed near Johnston Atoll and later Wake Island, where it caused heavy damage but no deaths. The deadliest storm of the season was Hurricane John, which killed six people after striking the Baja California Peninsula, and the costliest storm was Hurricane Lane, which caused $203 million in damage in southwestern Mexico (2006  USD, $252 million2019 USD).

Hurricane Ioke Category 5 Pacific hurricane and typhoon in 2006

Hurricane Ioke, also referred to as Typhoon Ioke, was the most intense hurricane ever recorded in the Central Pacific. The first storm to form in the Central Pacific in the 2006 Pacific hurricane season, Ioke was a record breaking, long-lived and extremely powerful storm that traversed the Pacific for 17 days, reaching the equivalent of Category 5 status on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane scale on three different occasions.

Johnston Atoll United States Minor Outlying Islands

Johnston Atoll, also known as Kalama Atoll to Native Hawaiians, is an unincorporated territory of the United States currently administered by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Johnston Atoll is a National Wildlife Refuge and is closed to public entry. Limited access for management needs is only by Letter of Authorization from the U.S. Air Force and Special Use Permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Wake Island United States Minor Outlying Islands

Wake Island is a coral atoll in the western Pacific Ocean in the northeastern area of the Micronesia subregion, 1,501 miles east of Guam, 2,298 miles west of Honolulu, 1,991 miles southeast of Tokyo, and 898 miles north of Majuro. The island is an unorganized, unincorporated territory of the United States that is also claimed by the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Wake Island is one of the most isolated islands in the world and the nearest inhabited island is Utirik Atoll in the Marshall Islands, 592 miles to the southeast.

Seasonal activity began on May 27, when Tropical Storm Aletta formed off the southwest coast of Mexico. No storms formed in June, though the season became active in July when five named storms developed, including Hurricane Daniel which was the second strongest storm of the season, as well as Tropical Storm Emilia. During August, Hurricanes Ioke and John formed, as well as four other storms. September was a relatively quiet month with two storms, of which one was Hurricane Lane. Three storms developed in October including Hurricane Paul and two formed in November; this marked the second time on record, after 1961, when more than one tropical storm developed in the basin during the month of November.

Hurricane Daniel (2006)

Hurricane Daniel was the second strongest hurricane of the 2006 Pacific hurricane season. The fourth named storm of the season, Daniel originated on July 16 from a tropical wave off the coast of Mexico. It tracked westward, intensifying steadily to reach peak winds of 150 mph (240 km/h) on July 22. At the time, the characteristics of the cyclone resembled those of an annular hurricane. Daniel gradually weakened as it entered an area of cooler water temperatures and increased wind shear, and after crossing into the Central Pacific Ocean, it quickly degenerated into a remnant low-pressure area on July 26, before dissipating two days later.

Tropical Storm Emilia (2006) Pacific tropical storm in 2006

Tropical Storm Emilia was a rare tropical cyclone that affected the Baja California peninsula in July 2006. The sixth tropical depression and fifth tropical storm of the 2006 Pacific hurricane season, it developed on July 21 about 400 miles (650 km) off the coast of Mexico. It moved northward toward the coast, reaching peak winds of 65 mph (105 km/h) before turning westward and encountering unfavorable conditions. Emilia later turned to the north, passing near Baja California as a strong tropical storm. Subsequently, the storm moved further away from the coast, and on July 27 it dissipated.

Hurricane Paul (2006) Category 2 Pacific hurricane in 2006

Hurricane Paul was a hurricane that ultimately struck Mexico as a tropical depression in October 2006. It developed from an area of disturbed weather on October 21, and slowly intensified as it moved into an area of warm waters and progressively decreasing wind shear. Paul attained hurricane status on October 23, and later that day it reached its peak intensity of 105 mph (165 km/h), a strong Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A strong trough turned the hurricane to the north and northeast into an area of strong vertical shear, and Paul weakened to a tropical storm on October 24. It accelerated northeastward, and after passing a short distance south of Baja California Sur the low level circulation became decoupled from the rest of the convection. Paul weakened to a tropical depression on October 25 a short distance off the coast of Mexico, and after briefly turning away from the coast it made landfall on northwestern Sinaloa on October 26.

Seasonal forecast

Predictions of tropical activity in the 2006 season
for the Eastern North Pacific
SourceDateNamed
storms
HurricanesMajor
hurricanes
CPC Average [2] 15.38.84.2
NOAAMay 22, 200612–166–81–3
Actual activity18105

On May 22, 2006, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) CPC (CPC) released their forecasts for the 2006 Atlantic and Pacific hurricane seasons. The Pacific season was expected to be hindered by the decades-long cycle that began in 1995, which generally increased wind shear across the basin. NOAA predicted a below-normal level of activity in the Eastern Pacific, with 12–16 named storms, of which 6–8 were expected to become hurricanes, and 1–3 expected to become major hurricanes. [3] The Central Pacific Hurricane Center's area of responsibility was also expected to be below average, with only two to three tropical cyclones expected to form or cross into the area. [4] They expected that neither El Niño nor La Niña would affect conditions significantly. [3]

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration An American scientific agency within the US Department of Commerce that focuses on the oceans and the atmosphere

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is an American scientific agency within the United States Department of Commerce that focuses on the conditions of the oceans, major waterways, and the atmosphere.

Climate Prediction Center United States weather agency

The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) is a United States federal agency that is one of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, which are a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service. CPC is headquartered in College Park, Maryland. Its roots trace back to the late 18th century, with the United States Army Signal Corp taking over responsibility of the climate program in the late 19th century. Once it became part of the United States Weather Bureau, it was known as the Weather Bureau Climate and Crop Services. From 1957 through 1966, the United States Weather Bureau's Office of Climatology, located in Washington, D.C. and then Suitland, Maryland, published the Mariners Weather Log publication. Late in the 20th century, it was known as the Climate Analysis Center for a time, before evolving into CPC in 1995. CPC issues climate forecasts valid for weeks and months in advance.

2006 Atlantic hurricane season Summary of the relevant tropical storms

The 2006 Atlantic hurricane season was the least active since 1997 as well as the first season since 2001 in which no hurricanes made landfall in the United States, and was the first since 1994 in which no tropical cyclones formed during October. Following the intense activity of 2005, forecasters predicted that the 2006 season would be only slightly less active. Instead activity was slowed by a rapidly forming moderate El Niño event, the presence of the Saharan Air Layer over the tropical Atlantic, and the steady presence of a robust secondary high-pressure area to the Azores high centered on Bermuda. There were no tropical cyclones after October 2.

On May 15, the hurricane season began in the Eastern Pacific basin, which is the area of the northern Pacific Ocean east of 140°W. [5] On June 1, the season began in the Central Pacific warning zone (between 140°W and the International Dateline); however, no storms occurred in the region until July. [6]

Pacific Ocean Ocean between Asia and Australia in the west, the Americas in the east and Antarctica or the Southern Ocean in the south.

The Pacific Ocean is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the Southern Ocean in the south and is bounded by Asia and Australia in the west and the Americas in the east.

Longitude A geographic coordinate that specifies the east-west position of a point on the Earths surface

Longitude, is a geographic coordinate that specifies the east–west position of a point on the Earth's surface, or the surface of a celestial body. It is an angular measurement, usually expressed in degrees and denoted by the Greek letter lambda (λ). Meridians connect points with the same longitude. By convention, one of these, the Prime Meridian, which passes through the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, England, was allocated the position of 0° longitude. The longitude of other places is measured as the angle east or west from the Prime Meridian, ranging from 0° at the Prime Meridian to +180° eastward and −180° westward. Specifically, it is the angle between a plane through the Prime Meridian and a plane through both poles and the location in question.

Seasonal summary

Hurricane Paul (2006)Hurricane Lane (2006)Hurricane John (2006)Hurricane IokeSaffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale2006 Pacific hurricane season

The Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index for the 2006 Pacific hurricane season in total is 156.99 units (120.48 units in the Eastern Pacific and 36.513 units in the Central Pacific). [nb 1] Broadly speaking, ACE is a measure of the power of a tropical or subtropical storm multiplied by the length of time it existed. Therefore, a storm with a longer duration, such as Hurricane Ioke, which arrived with a total of 32.2250 units and then crossed to the Western Pacific, will have high values of ACE. It is only calculated for full advisories on specific tropical and subtropical systems reaching or exceeding wind speeds of 39 mph (63 km/h).

Most intense Pacific hurricanes [7]
RankHurricaneSeasonPressure
hPainHg
1 Patricia 2015 87225.75
2 Linda 1997 90226.64
3 Rick 2009 90626.76
4 Kenna 2002 91326.96
5 Ava 1973 91527.02
Ioke 2006
7 Marie 2014 91827.11
Odile
9 Guillermo 1997 91927.14
10 Gilma 1994 92027.17
Walaka 2018
Listing is only for tropical cyclones in the Pacific Ocean
north of the equator and east of the International Dateline

Overall, there were 19 tropical storms. In addition, 11 hurricanes developed. Furthermore, there were total of six major hurricanes, Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The season officially started on May 15 in the East Pacific Ocean, and on June 1 in the Central Pacific; they both ended on November 30. No tropical storms developed in June in the basin, which was unusual compared to the average of two storms forming during the month.

From 1966 to 2008, there have been only three other seasons in which a tropical storm did not form in June, these being 1969, 2004, 2007 seasons. [8] After such an inactive month, the tropics became active in July when five named storms developed, including Hurricane Daniel which was the second strongest storm of the season. During August, Hurricanes Ioke and John formed, as well as four other storms. September was a relatively quiet month with two storms, of which one was Hurricane Lane. [7] By that time, however, El Niño conditions became established across the Pacific, [9] which is known to enhance Pacific hurricane activity. [3]

Three storms developed in October, including Hurricane Paul. [7] Tropical activity within the basin in November 2006 was the most active on record, based on the ACE Index. Three tropical cyclones formed, of which two became tropical storms; only one other season on record at the time, 1961, produced two tropical storms in the month of November. [10] In addition, Mexico was struck by four tropical cyclones in 2006, none on the Atlantic coast and all along the Pacific coast. [11] One hit Baja California Peninsula while the others made landfall on the mainland. [12]

An extratropical storm persisted in the extreme northern central Pacific Ocean in late October. It drifted over unusually warm waters up to 3.6 °F (2 °C) above normal, and gradually developed convection near the center. By November 2, QuikSCAT satellite suggested the system attained winds of up to 60 mph (95 km/h) about 900 mi (1450 km) west of Oregon. The system also developed an eye and an eyewall. The cyclone tracked northeastward as it gradually weakened, and dissipated on November 4. NASA considered the cyclone to be a subtropical storm. However, as it formed outside of the territory of any monitoring organization, it was not named. Operationally, the United States Navy treated the system as a tropical disturbance, numbered 91C. [13]

Systems

Tropical Storm Aletta

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Tropical Storm Aletta (2006).jpg   Aletta 2006 track.png
DurationMay 27 – May 30
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1002  mbar  (hPa)

The first storm of the year had its genesis from a tropical wave that crossed Central America and entered the East Pacific on May 21. The system interacted with a trough near the Gulf of Tehuantepec, causing thunderstorms to increase. A large low pressure area formed on May 25 south of Mexico, which organized slowly due to wind shear in the region. Early on May 27, the NHC designated the system as Tropical Depression One-E about 190 mi (305 km) south of Acapulco. [14] The nascent storm moved little, and the wind shear displaced the center west of the convection. [15] Late on May 27, the NHC upgraded the depression to Tropical Storm Aletta. [14] While named tropical cyclones in May are infrequent events, Aletta marked the seventh consecutive year to have a named cyclone form in May. [16] The storm drifted for several days off the southern coast of Mexico. The NHC estimated peak winds of 45 mph (75 km/h) on May 28, [14] as the storm presented an elongated cloud structure. [17] Increased wind shear and dry air caused weakening on May 29, and Aletta weakened into a tropical depression. Drifting westward, the system became a remnant low on May 31, and dissipated soon afterward. [14]

The storm moved toward the Guerrero coast in southwestern Mexico, prompting the Mexican government to issue tropical storm watches between Punta Maldonado and Zihuatanejo. [18] Aletta produced moderate rainfall across Mexico, including a 24-hour rainfall total of 100 mm (3.94 inches) [nb 2] in Jacatepec, Oaxaca on May 30, and 96 mm (3.78 inches) in La Calera, Guerrero, on the next day. [18] High winds knocked down trees and caused minor structural damage. In Zihuatanejo, a ship with nine people was rescued after being reported as lost, which may have been a result of high seas generated by Aletta. [19]

Tropical Depression Two-E

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
02E 2006-06-03 2015Z.jpg   Two-E 2006 track.png
DurationJune 3 – June 5
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1005  mbar  (hPa)

On the day after Aletta dissipated, a new area of disturbed weather developed off the southwest Mexican coast. High shear slowed the development of the system, although it gained enough convection and organization to be classified as a tropical depression on June 3. The depression strengthened to near tropical storm status as it approached the coast of southwestern Mexico; however, shear persisted over the system and it weakened before dissipating on June 4. [20]

Despite never becoming a named storm, heavy rain occurred, including a total of 19.13 inches (486 mm) measured in a 48‑hour period in Acapulco. [21] Mudslides and flash flooding were reported, [20] forcing 72 people from their homes. [22] No deaths or serious damage was reported. [20]

Hurricane Bud

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane bud 2006.jpg   Bud 2006 track.png
DurationJuly 11 – July 16
Peak intensity125 mph (205 km/h) (1-min)  953  mbar  (hPa)

A tropical wave exited the west coast of Africa on June 27, which reached the eastern Pacific on July 7. The system spawned a low pressure area south of Mexico. Associated convection gradually became better organized, and the system organized into Tropical Depression Three-E early on July 11. Steered by a subtropical ridge over Mexico, the storm tracked west-northwestward for its entirety. Located over warm waters, the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Bud within six hours of its formation. [23] The thunderstorms organized, with good outflow except to the east due to the presence of Tropical Storm Carlotta. On July 12, the NHC upgraded Bud to a hurricane, after an eye developed in the storm's center. [24] [23] [25] Later on July 12, Bud was upgraded to a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. [23]

Early on July 13, Bud became a Category 3 hurricane, or a major hurricane. At that time, the well-defined eye was enclosed by a ring of deep thunderstorms. [26] That day, the hurricane reached its peak intensity of 125 mph (205 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 953 mbar (28.1 inHg). Bud encountered cooler waters and stable air, and a period of rapid weakening began. [23] The eye became obscured, and core convective cloud tops began to warm, [27] until much of the convection was lost on July 14, impeded by southeasterly wind shear. [23] On July 15, Bud was downgraded to a tropical depression, and the next day it degenerated into a remnant low . The low fully dissipated on July 17 about 750 mi (1,210 km) east-northeast of Hawaii. [23] The remnants of Bud produced light rainfall across Hawaii. [28]

Hurricane Carlotta

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Carlotta 2006-07-13 2105Z.jpg   Carlotta 2006 track.png
DurationJuly 12 – July 16
Peak intensity85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  981  mbar  (hPa)

A tropical wave exited Africa on June 30 and moved across the Atlantic Ocean without development. On July 9, while crossing Central America into the eastern North Pacific Ocean, thunderstorm activity increased, and the system organized into Tropical Depression Four-E early on July 12 about 290 mi (465 km) south of Zihuatanejo, Guerrero. [29] The large depression moved quickly to the west-northwest to the south of a ridge over northwestern Mexico, and its outer rainbands moved across the coast. Rainfall totals were less than 1 inch (25 mm). [29] The depression intensified into Tropical Storm Carlotta just six hours after forming. [29] By late on July 12, the storm developed banding features, [30] and early on July 13 Carlotta attained hurricane status about 430 mi (700 km) south of the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula. [29]

As Carlotta intensified, the system became more compact, and it reached peak winds of 85 mph (140 km/h) on July 13. [29] An eye formed in the center, and the hurricane was briefly forecast to attain major hurricane status, or a Category 3 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. [31] However, Carlotta weakened due to increased wind shear from Hurricane Bud to its west, [29] and the eye and convection deteriorated. [32] Carlotta briefly weakened to tropical storm status late on July 14, although a decrease in shear allowed it to reintensify into a hurricane. This was short-lived as the center moved into the area of cooler waters, and Carlotta again weakened to tropical storm status. [29] Late on July 15, the circulation became separated from the convection, [33] and Carlotta weakened to tropical depression status on July 16, and the next day generated into a remnant low. The circulation continued generally westward, dissipating on July 20 about 1500 mi (2400 km) east of the Hawaiian islands. [29]

Hurricane Daniel

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane daniel 2006.jpg   Daniel 2006 track.png
DurationJuly 16 – July 26
Peak intensity150 mph (240 km/h) (1-min)  933  mbar  (hPa)

On July 16, a tropical disturbance formed far to the south of the Baja California Peninsula and quickly increased in convective activity and organization, becoming a tropical depression. The system continued to organize and was designated as a tropical storm the next day. On July 18, Daniel attained hurricane status, and two days later underwent rapid intensification; it reached major hurricane status and was later upgraded further to Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Its peak intensity was 150 mph (240 km/h). [34] The hurricane underwent eyewall replacement cycles, which are internal mechanisms that occur in most intense hurricanes. Daniel later became an annular hurricane, which allowed it to maintain Category 4 status for longer than it otherwise would have. [35]

It crossed over into the Central Pacific early on July 24 and was predicted to affect Hawaii as a tropical storm; however, Daniel encountered weak steering currents in the open ocean, causing it to slow down considerably. [34] It rapidly degenerated to a tropical depression on July 25, and the CPHC issued its last advisory on July 26 while the storm was still well to the east of Hawaii. Its remnants later moved across the Hawaiian islands, [34] dropping heavy rainfall and causing flooding. [9] West Wailuaiki on Maui recorded 3.87 inches (98 mm) in one day, which was the highest daily rainfall total from the hurricane. [28]

Tropical Storm Emilia

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
TS Emilia 2006.jpg   Emilia 2006 track.png
DurationJuly 21 – July 28
Peak intensity65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min)  990  mbar  (hPa)

The origins of Emilia were from a tropical wave that developed into a tropical depression on July 21, a short distance off the coast of Acapulco. It moved generally north-northwestward, reaching tropical storm status on July 22 and passing about 175 mi (280 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Colima. [36] An eyewall began to form that day, [37] and Emilia reached peak winds of 65 mph (105 km/h). [36] It briefly weakened due to wind shear, although restrengthening occurred as the storm turned toward the Baja California peninsula. On July 26, Emilia again reached peak winds of 65 mph (105 km/h), and shortly thereafter it passed about 60 mi (95 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. It weakened as it turned into cooler waters, first to tropical depression status on July 27 and then to a convective-less remnant low on July 28. The remnants dissipated on July 31 about 495 mi (800 km) west-southwest of San Diego, California. [36]

In southwestern Mexico, Emilia produced tropical storm force winds along the coastline. Rainfall in the southern portion of the Baja California peninsula caused minor flooding, and gusty winds caused damage to buildings and power lines. [36] Moisture from Emilia reached the southwestern United States. Thunderstorms and rainfall occurred across Arizona, causing flooding. [38] In southern California, the storm dropped light rainfall, which assisted firefighters in containing a wildfire. [39]

Tropical Storm Fabio

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Tropical Storm Fabio 2006.jpg   Fabio 2006 track.png
DurationJuly 31 – August 3
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1000  mbar  (hPa)

A tropical wave crossed the west coast of Africa on July 15 and entered the Pacific on July 25. Convection increased on July 28, and at 1800 UTC on July 31 the system became Tropical Depression Seven-E about 980 miles (1,580 km) southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula. Six hours later, the depression was upgraded to Tropical Storm Fabio. It moved westward due to a ridge to its north, and on August 1 Fabio reached peak winds of 50 mph (85 km/h). Later, the storm began weakening due to increased wind shear and dry air. On August 3, Fabio deteriorated to tropical depression status, and later that day it degenerated into a remnant low pressure area. The remnants continued westward, moving across Hawaii on August 7. [40]

Although Fabio did not impact land, its remnants produced heavy rainfall in Hawaii. In a 24-hour period, 2.89 inches (73 mm) of rainfall was recorded at Glenwood on the island of Hawaii; this was the highest daily rainfall total for the month on the island. However, the heaviest precipitation fell on Mount Waiʻaleʻale on Kauai, where 15.08 inches (383 mm) fell in 24 hours; this total alone was greater than all other monthly rainfall totals in the state. [41] The heavy rainfall flooded the Hanalei River, which forced the closure of the Kuhio Highway when a bridge was inundated. [40] On Oahu, the rainfall caused ponding on roadways and flooding along streams. One flooded stream stranded 24 hikers along a trail, all of whom required rescue by helicopter. [42]

Tropical Storm Gilma

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Gilma 2006-08-02 1745Z.jpg   Gilma 2006 track.png
DurationAugust 1 – August 3
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1004  mbar  (hPa)

On July 17, a tropical wave exited Africa and crossed the Atlantic without developing. On July 25 it entered the Eastern Pacific, gradually developing an area of organized convection. Despite marginally favorable upper-level winds, the system organized enough to be declared a tropical depression on August 1, several hundred miles southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. [43] Initially, the depression tracked west-northwestward. [7] Despite wind shear in the area, [44] the depression was upgraded to Tropical Storm Gilma later on August 1. The wind shear prevented further strengthening or organization, and Gilma weakened to a tropical depression early on August 2. [43] The depression turned westward, [7] and Gilma degenerated into a remnant low by August 4. [43]

Hurricane Hector

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane hector 2006.jpg   Hector 2006 track.png
DurationAugust 15 – August 23
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  966  mbar  (hPa)

A tropical wave exited Africa on July 31, and after no development in the Atlantic, it crossed Central America into the northeastern Pacific Ocean on August 10. Convection gradually increased, and a broad low pressure area developed about 375 miles (605 km) south of Acapulco, Mexico on August 13. The system continued to become organized, and it developed into a tropical depression around 1800  UTC on August 15 about 650 mi (1,045 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. It moved west-northwestward, located south of a ridge that extended westward from northern Mexico westward into the Pacific. The depression quickly intensified into Tropical Storm Hector early on August 16. [45] Hector was able to steadily strengthen, reaching hurricane status at 0600 UTC on August 17. It is estimated that Hector reached its peak intensity of 110 mph (175 km/h) at 0600 UTC on August 18, while centered about 1,035 mi (1,665 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. [7]

Hector remained a Category 2 hurricane for about 24 hours. [7] Shortly thereafter, it encountered cooler waters and westerly shear, [46] and Hector steadily weakened until becoming a tropical storm by August 20. Shortly thereafter, the storm reached a weakness in the subtropical ridge, which caused it to move slowly to the northwest. By August 21, deep convection was confined to the northeast portion of the circulation. [47] The shear was not strong enough to completely weaken the tropical cyclone and Hector remained a tropical storm with 50 mph (85 km/h) winds for about 24 hours. [45] After the remaining shower and thunderstorm activity dissipated on August 22, the cyclone turned westward in response to the low-level easterly wind flow. [48] Hector weakened to a tropical depression at 0000 UTC on August 23, and to a remnant low six hours later. The remnant circulation of Hector dissipated on August 24 about 750 mi (1,210 km) east of the Hawaiian Islands. [49]

Hurricane Ioke

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Ioke 2006-08-25 0100Z.jpg   Ioke 2006 track.png
DurationAugust 20 – August 27 (Exited basin)
Peak intensity160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  915  mbar  (hPa)

The cyclone developed from the Intertropical Convergence Zone on August 20 far to the south of Hawaii. Encountering warm waters, little wind shear, and well-defined outflow, Ioke intensified from a tropical depression to Category 4 status within 48 hours. Late on August 22 it rapidly weakened to Category 2 status before crossing over Johnston Atoll. Two days later favorable conditions again allowed for rapid strengthening, and Ioke attained Category 5 status on August 25 before crossing the International Date Line. At the time, its barometric pressure was estimated at 915  mbar, thus becoming the strongest hurricane on record in the Central Pacific. [9] As it continued westward its intensity fluctuated, and on August 31 it passed near Wake Island with winds of 155 mph (249 km/h). Ioke gradually weakened as it turned northwestward and northward, and by September 6 it had transitioned into an extratropical cyclone. [50] By then, the cyclone had lasted 19 days, reaching the equivalent of Category 5 status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale three times. [9] The remnants of Ioke accelerated northeastward and ultimately crossed into Alaska. [51]

Ioke did not affect any permanently populated areas in the Central Pacific or Western Pacific basins as a hurricane or a typhoon. A crew of 12 people stayed in a hurricane-proof bunker on Johnston Atoll during the hurricane's passage; the crew estimated winds reached over 100 mph (160 km/h), which damaged trees on the island but did not impact the island's bird population. [9] [52] The hurricane left moderate damage on Wake Island totaling $88 million (2006 USD), which resulted from blown off roofs and damaged buildings, although the infrastructure of the island was left intact. All military personnel were evacuated from the island, the first full-scale evacuation of the island since Typhoon Sarah in 1967. [53] [54] [55] Later, the extratropical remnants of Ioke produced a severe storm surge along the Alaskan coastline, causing beach erosion. [56]

Hurricane Ileana

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Ileana 23 aug 2006 1750Z.jpg   Ileana 2006 track.png
DurationAugust 21 – August 27
Peak intensity120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min)  955  mbar  (hPa)

A tropical wave exited the west coast of Africa on August 8, and entered the eastern Pacific on August 16. Three days later, a weak low pressure area formed, and thunderstorms consolidated near that feature. On August 21, the NHC designated the system Tropical Depression Ten-E about 350 mi (560 km) south-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. A ridge over Mexico steered the system to the northwest through an area of warm waters and low wind shear. With favorable conditions, the depression quickly intensified into Tropical Storm Ileana. [57] An eye formed in the center of the convection, and Ileana attained hurricane status late on August 22. [58] On August 23, about 48 hours after forming, Ileana reached major hurricane status and a peak intensity of 120 mph (195 km/h), with a minimum pressure of 955 mbar (28.2 inHg). At that time, the storm was about 60 mi (100 km) southeast of the unpopulated Socorro Island. [57] During the storm's passage nearby, a station on the island recorded sustained winds of 59 mph (95 km/h), with gusts to 77 mph (125 km/h). [57]

As Ileana was heading north along the Mexican coastline, slight rainfall was recorded along the coast, [59] which caused some flooding in Nayarit, Jalisco, Colima, Michoacán, and Baja California Sur. [60] High surf killed a man near Cabo San Lucas, despite warnings not to swim in the ocean. [61] Despite forecasts of further intensification to Category 4 status, [62] Ileana began weakening due to cooler waters. The thunderstorms waned, and the storm slowed its forward motion. [57] [63] On August 26, Ileana weakened to tropical storm status as convection decreased markedly. The next day, the storm deteriorated to tropical depression status, and later a remnant low after being devoid of thunderstorms. The low continued slowly westward, dissipating on August 29 about 830 mi (1340 km) west-northwest of Cabo San Lucas. [57]

Hurricane John

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane John Aug 31 2006.jpg   John 2006 track.png
DurationAugust 28 – September 4
Peak intensity130 mph (215 km/h) (1-min)  948  mbar  (hPa)

On August 28, a persistent area of low pressure southwest of Acapulco, Mexico developed into a tropical depression. Later that day it strengthened into a tropical storm, and it reached hurricane strength 24 hours later on August 29. John underwent rapid intensification and reached Category 3 intensity later that day and Category 4 on August 30. [64] Hours later, the hurricane underwent another eyewall replacement cycle, [65] and subsequently weakened to Category 3 status as it paralleled the Mexican coastline a short distance offshore. [66] Potentially due to its eyewall replacement cycle or its interaction with land, Hurricane John weakened to a 105 mph hurricane by late on August 31, [67] but restrengthened to a major hurricane shortly after. It made landfall near the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula as a Category 2 hurricane on September 1. [68] John continued northwestward along the eastern Baja California peninsula, weakening to tropical depression status by September 3 and dissipating on September 4 in the Gulf of California. [64]

Along the southwestern coast of Mexico, Hurricane John produced heavy surf, strong winds, and heavy rainfall, which flooded roads, caused mudslides, and downed trees. [64] [69] Along the Baja California Peninsula, the hurricane dropped heavy rainfall, with a 24-hour peak of 10.8 inches (276 mm) in Los Planes. [70] The heavy rainfall caused flooding, closed roads, [71] and caused a dam to overflow. [72] The winds and rainfall destroyed thousands of flimsy houses across the region. [73] Across Mexico, five people were killed, [64] and damage amounted to $663 million (2006  MXN, $60.8 million 2006  USD). [74] Moisture from the remnants of John produced flooding across Texas, which closed a ½ mile (800 m) portion of Interstate 10 in El Paso. [75] In southern New Mexico, the rainfall caused widespread street flooding and some minor damage. [76] Tropical moisture from the storm also produced rainfall in Arizona and southern California, where eight separate mudslides occurred, trapping 19 vehicles but causing no injuries. [77]

Hurricane Kristy

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
12E Hurricane Kristy 2006.jpg   Kristy 2006 track.png
DurationAugust 30 – September 8
Peak intensity80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  985  mbar  (hPa)

On August 30, a tropical wave located about 525 miles (850 km) south-southwest of Baja California became more organized and was designated as the twelfth tropical depression of the 2006 season. It strengthened into Tropical Storm Kristy and became Hurricane Kristy the next day. It did not retain this status for long, partly due to its proximity to Hurricane John. [78] There was a possibility of a Fujiwhara interaction between both systems, causing Kristy to weaken or perhaps be absorbed into the circulation of John. [79] This did not occur, however. Kristy weakened steadily after its peak intensity and looked to be close to dissipating, but on September 3 and again on September 5, convection flared up and it returned to tropical storm strength. [78] After oscillating between storm and depression strength, the system degenerated into a remnant low on September 7, which dissipated on September 8 without affecting land. [78]

Hurricane Lane

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Lane 16 sept 2006 aqua.jpg   Lane 2006 track.png
DurationSeptember 13 – September 17
Peak intensity125 mph (205 km/h) (1-min)  952  mbar  (hPa)

On September 13, a tropical disturbance located about 125 miles (200 km) west-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico, gradually became better organized and was designated the thirteenth tropical depression of the 2006 season. The depression intensified in a favorable environment, and was upgraded to Tropical Storm Lane later that night. As it moved parallel to the Mexican coast it continued to strengthen and became a hurricane on September 15, and a major hurricane early the next day. Hurricane Lane reached peak winds of 125 mph (205 km/h) before it made landfall on the coast of Sinaloa on September 16. It quickly weakened over land and dissipated on September 17. [80]

Tropical Storm Lane produced heavy rainfall and high seas along the west coast of Mexico, including Acapulco where flood waters reached 16 inches (40 cm) in depth. The Acapulco airport also experienced flooding, though service was not interrupted. [81] Throughout Mexico, the hurricane caused four deaths and $2.2 billion (2006 MXN, $203 million 2006 USD) in damage, [82] half of which in Sinaloa where heavy crop damage was reported. [83] An estimated 4,320 homes were affected by the hurricane, and 19,200 miles (30,000 km) of roads and highways were damaged to some degree, including some destroyed bridges. [82]

Tropical Storm Miriam

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Miriam06.jpg   Miriam 2006 track.png
DurationSeptember 16 – September 18
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  999  mbar  (hPa)

A disturbance associated with a northerly extension of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and a tropical wave developed a closed circulation on September 15. It moved northeastward due to the influence from nearby Hurricane Lane, and organized enough to be declared Tropical Depression Fourteen-E on September 16 while located about 500 miles southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. It quickly strengthened, and organized into Tropical Storm Miriam later that day. After reaching a peak intensity of 45 mph (70 km/h), vertical wind shear and cooler waters rapidly weakened the storm, and the circulation decoupled from the convection on September 17. After turning more towards the north, Miriam weakened to tropical depression status, and on September 18 it degenerated to a remnant low. The remnant circulation turned to the northwest, then to the east, and dissipated on September 21 a short distance west of Baja California. No deaths are damage are associated with Miriam, and only one ship recorded winds of over tropical storm force near the center. [84]

Tropical Depression Two-C

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
02C 2006-09-19 2055Z.jpg   2-C 2006 track.png
DurationSeptember 19 – September 20
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007  mbar  (hPa)

On September 19, an area of disturbed weather associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone became sufficiently organized to be designated Tropical Depression Two-C. Initially, it was thought that the depression formed from the remnants of Hurricane Kristy, although subsequent analysis confirmed they were two separate systems. Initially, the depression was in an area of favorable conditions, with little wind shear and warm waters. [9] As a result, the CPHC predicted significant strengthening to at least hurricane status. [85] Instead, a high pressure system to its north increased wind shear over the depression, causing the convection to become removed from the center. The depression weakened into a remnant low on September 20, never reaching tropical storm status. [9]

Tropical Depression Three-C

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
TD 03C 2006 NRL.jpg   3-C 2006 track.png
DurationSeptember 26 – September 27
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1005  mbar  (hPa)

During September, El Niño conditions became established across the Pacific, which produced an area of warmer waters along the International Date Line. A few days after Tropical Depression Two-C dissipated, another area of disturbed weather formed, and although it was disorganized, it was also persistent. The CPHC initiated advisories on Tropical Depression Three-C on September 26 after a circulation was evident in the system. Strong wind shear prevented any development, and the system dissipated on September 27. [9]

Tropical Storm Norman

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
TS Norman 09 oct 2006 1849Z.jpg   Norman 2006 track.png
DurationOctober 9 – October 15
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1000  mbar  (hPa)

Early in October, a low pressure system began to organize to the west of the Mexican coast, and on October 9 it developed into Tropical Depression Fifteen-E. It strengthened into a tropical storm the next day, but strong wind shear and low sea-surface temperatures hindered development. Norman slowly began to weaken, and on October 11 it degenerated into a remnant low pressure area. Turning eastward, the system combined with a new tropical disturbance off the southwest Mexican coast, and slowly began to reorganize. The system was re-designated a tropical depression on October 15 just south-southeast of Manzanillo, Colima, although within a few hours it again dissipated. [86]

The storm brought heavy rainfall to southwestern Mexico, peaking at 6.35 inches (161 mm) in La Villita, Michoacán. [87] The rainfall caused flooding and mudslides around Acapulco, affecting 170 homes, of which 20 were destroyed. [88] [89] About 300 hectares (740 acres) of crop fields sustained damage. [89] Initially there were two people missing; [89] however, a subsequent report indicated there were no casualties associated with the storm. [86]

Tropical Storm Olivia

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
TS Olivia 09 oct 2006 2155Z.jpg   Olivia 2006 track.png
DurationOctober 9 – October 12
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1000  mbar  (hPa)

On September 18, a tropical wave exited Africa and later crossed into the eastern Pacific on September 29 without development. Convection increased in the Pacific along the wave axis, spawning a broad low pressure area on October 5. Despite the presence of wind shear, it organized enough for the NHC to initiate advisories on Tropical Depression Sixteen-E on October 9 about 1,360 miles (2,190 km) to the west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. [90] Influenced by a high pressure system, the depression drifted northward. [91] Six hours after being upgraded to a tropical storm, Olivia attained peak winds of 45 mph (75 km/h), [90] although the convection was limited to its northern side due to wind shear. [92] On October 11, the convective activity diminished and Olivia weakened to tropical depression status. [93] Olivia deteriorated into a remnant low on October 13. It moved towards the east-southeast, and on October 15 was absorbed into the remnants of Tropical Storm Norman. Olivia never affected land. [90]

Tropical Depression Four-C

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
04C 2006-10-13 2147Z.jpg   4-C 2006 track.png
DurationOctober 13 – October 14
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007  mbar  (hPa)

In the middle of October, the Intertropical Convergence Zone extended across the central Pacific Ocean, resembling an extension of the monsoon trough. An area of disturbed weather formed well to the southwest of Hawaii, organizing slowly for several days. Late on October 13, after the development of a low-level circulation and persistent convection, the CPHC classified the system as Tropical Depression Four-C about 750 mi (1,200 km) southwest of Honolulu, Hawaii. Upon being classified, the depression was located in an unusual steering flow that caused it to track eastward. Due to the approach of an upper-level trough, it was expected to dissipate quickly from wind shear, although forecasters noted the possibility for the trough to provide an outflow channel, which might allow strengthening. [94] On October 14, strong wind shear removed the convection completely from the center, and the system degenerated into a remnant low. [9]

The remnant circulation continued slowly eastward, dissipating on October 16. Concurrently, the convection tracked northeastward ahead of the upper-level trough, which contributed to heavy rainfall and flooding on the island of Hawaii on October 17. [9] The rainfall event coincided with the 2006 Kiholo Bay earthquake striking the area. [95]

Hurricane Paul

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Paul 23 oct 2006 2030Z.jpg   Paul 2006 track.png
DurationOctober 21 – October 26
Peak intensity105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min)  970  mbar  (hPa)

Hurricane Paul developed from an area of disturbed weather on October 21, and slowly intensified as it moved into an area of warm waters and progressively decreasing wind shear. Paul attained hurricane status on October 23, and later that day it reached its peak intensity of 105 mph (165 km/h), a strong Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A strong trough turned the hurricane to the north and northeast into an area of strong vertical shear, and Paul weakened to a tropical storm on October 24, later passing just south of the Baja California Peninsula. Paul weakened to a tropical depression on October 25 a short distance off the coast of Mexico, and after briefly turning away from the coast it made landfall on northwestern Sinaloa on October 26. [96]

Paul was the third hurricane to threaten western Mexico in the season, the others being Hurricanes John and Lane. Rough surf killed two people along Baja California Sur, [97] while two deaths from flooding were reported in Sinaloa. [98] Paul dropped moderate rainfall across mainland Mexico, including a 24-hour total of 2.28 inches (58 mm) in Mazatlán, Sinaloa. [99] Damage totaled more than $35 million (2006  MXN, $3.2 million 2006  USD). [100]

Tropical Depression Eighteen-E

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
TD 18E 26 oct 2006 1755Z.jpg   18-E 2006 track.png
DurationOctober 26 – October 27
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007  mbar  (hPa)

The origins of Tropical Depression Eighteen-E were from a tropical wave that exited the coast of Africa on October 7. It briefly spawned a low-pressure area as the wave continued westward without development. On October 20, the wave entered the Pacific Ocean, developing an area of thunderstorms about four days later. By 1200 UTC on October 26, a tropical depression formed about 155 mi (260 km) south of Manzanillo. [101] Initially, Tropical Depression Eighteen-E was located in an area of light wind shear, and the NHC anticipated further organization and strengthening to near hurricane status. [102] The tropical depression initially maintained a steady westward motion away from the Mexican coastline, due to a ridge north of the cyclone. [102] By October 17, convection had decreased, and the depression was not forecast to intensify as much. [103] Possibly due to intrusion of dry air, the circulation became exposed from the thunderstorms, and having weakened, it turned to a southward drift. [104] By 0000 UTC on October 28, the system had weakened to a non-convective remnant low, which dissipated the following day. [101]

Tropical Storm Rosa

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Rosa 2006-11-08 1725Z.jpg   Rosa 2006 track.png
DurationNovember 8 – November 10
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1002  mbar  (hPa)

A tropical wave exited western Africa on October 22 and continued westward into the Pacific on November 2, spawning a tropical depression on November 8 about 440 mi (710 km) south of Manzanillo, Colima. [105] Environmental conditions appeared favorable, [106] although wind shear removed the convection from the circulation. [107] Throughout its duration, the storm maintained a northwest track through a weakness in a subtropical ridge. [108] By November 9, a new area of convection persisted near the center, [109] and a banding feature formed. [108] Despite the shear, the depression was upgraded to Tropical Storm Rosa, although the shear prevented intensification beyond its peak of 40 mph (65 km/h). [105] Rosa remained a tropical storm for only 18 hours, becoming a tropical depression early on November 10 and dissipating later that day. [105] Rosa was the first tropical storm in the basin to develop during November since 2000, and was also the first tropical depression to form in the month since 2002's Tropical Depression Sixteen-E. No impact was reported from the storm. [105]

Tropical Depression Twenty-E

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
TD 20E 11 nov 2006 1755Z.jpg   20-E 2006 track.png
DurationNovember 11 – November 11
Peak intensity35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  1007  mbar  (hPa)

A tropical wave moved off the western coast of Africa on October 21, briefly developing two weak low pressure areas before the wave crossed into the Pacific Ocean on November 1. Thunderstorm activity slowly increased as the wave interacted within the Intertropical Convergence Zone. After a curved band of convection developed, it is estimated the system formed into Tropical Depression Twenty-E around 0000 UTC on November 11, about 550 mi (1,050 km) southwest of Manzanillo. Throughout its duration, the depression never completely separated from the Intertropical Convergence Zone. [110] When the NHC issued its first advisory on the depression, the agency predicted slight intensification to tropical storm status and for the depression to last at least two days. This was due to a forecast of gradually increasing wind shear after the first 24 hours. [111] Instead, the circulation became very elongated; it is estimated the cyclone degenerated into a trough by late on November 11. [110]

Hurricane Sergio

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hurricane Sergio 15 nov 2006 1725Z.jpg   Sergio 2006 track.png
DurationNovember 13 – November 20
Peak intensity110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  965  mbar  (hPa)

Just days after Tropical Depression Twenty-E degenerated into an open trough, Tropical Depression Twenty One-E developed from a tropical wave on November 13 about 460 miles (740 km) south of Manzanillo, Colima. It steadily intensified as it tracked southeastward, reaching peak winds of 110 mph (175 km/h) on November 15. Subsequently, it began to weaken due to increased wind shear as it turned to the north. Sergio later turned to the west, remaining well off the coast of Mexico, and it dissipated on November 20 about 320 miles (515 km) west-northwest of where it originally formed. [112]

Sergio produced light rainfall along the coast of Mexico, though its effects were minimal. [113] The formation of Sergio marked the 2006 season as the most active in 12 years and the second season in which more than one tropical storm formed in November, after 1961. Sergio set records for the month of November in the basin. At the time, it was considered the strongest hurricane to form in the month; although it has since dropped to third after Sandra from 2015, and Kenneth from 2011. It is however, still considered the longest-lived November Pacific tropical cyclone with a duration of seven days. [1] [112]

Other systems

The cyclone at peak intensity in the northeast Pacific, on November 1. Storm 91C 01 nov 2006 2030Z.jpg
The cyclone at peak intensity in the northeast Pacific, on November 1.

On October 28, 2006, a cut-off extratropical cyclone stalled over the northeast Pacific Ocean and began to strengthen. By October 31, the storm had acquired tropical characteristics, including an eye, convection, and a warmer-than-average core. [114] The system reached peak intensity on November 1, before slowly weakening and looping towards the Pacific Northwest. The system made landfall in Washington State on November 3, before rapidly weakening and dissipating on the next day. During the duration of the storm, the system was known as Storm 91C (or INVEST 91C). The storm's true nature still remains controversial among meteorologists today, due to disputes over the storm's exact structure and whether or not it had obtained tropical or subtropical characteristics. [115] Because the storm was not within the area of responsibility of the National Hurricane Center or the Central Pacific Hurricane Center, the storm was never assigned a name.

Storm names

The following names were used for named storms that formed in the northeast Pacific in 2006. [116] This is the same list that was used in the 2000 season. There were no names retired from the northeast Pacific list. Therefore, the same list was reused in the 2012 season.

  • Rosa
  • Sergio
  • Tara (unused)
  • Vicente (unused)
  • Willa (unused)
  • Xavier (unused)
  • Yolanda (unused)
  • Zeke (unused)

For storms that form in the Central Pacific Hurricane Center's area of responsibility, encompassing the area between 140 degrees west and the International Date Line, all names are used in a series of four rotating lists. The next four names that were slated for use in 2006 are shown below, however only the name Ioke was used.

  • Kika (unused)
  • Lana (unused)
  • Maka (unused)

Retirement

The name Ioke was retired from the north-central Pacific list by the World Meteorological Organization in the spring of 2007 and replaced with Iopa. [117] During the 61st Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference, the Hawaii State Civil Defense requested the retirement of the name Daniel, citing that the storm had become memorable due to threat of damage. [118] However, the request was denied, as the name remains on the tropical cyclone naming list. [116]

Season effects

This is a table of all the storms that formed in the 2006 Pacific hurricane season. It includes their duration, names, landfall(s), denoted in parentheses, damages, and death totals. Deaths in parentheses are additional and indirect (an example of an indirect death would be a traffic accident), but were still related to that storm. Damage and deaths include totals while the storm was extratropical, a wave, or a low, and all the damage figures are in 2006 USD.

Saffir–Simpson scale
TDTSC1C2C3C4C5
2006 Pacific hurricane season statistics
Storm
name
Dates activeStorm category

at peak intensity

Max 1-min
wind
mph (km/h)
Min.
press.
(mbar)
Areas affectedDamage
(USD)
DeathsRefs
AlettaMay 27 – 30Tropical storm45 (75)1002NoneMinimalNone
Two-E June 3 – 5Tropical depression35 (55)1005Southwestern Mexico, Western MexicoNoneNone
BudJuly 11 – 16Category 3 hurricane125 (205)953 Hawaii NoneNone
CarlottaJuly 12 – 16Category 1 hurricane85 (140)981NoneNoneNone
Daniel July 16 – 26Category 4 hurricane150 (240)933 Hawaii NoneNone
Emilia July 21 – 28Tropical storm65 (100)990Southwestern Mexico, Western Mexico, Baja California Peninsula, Southwestern United States NoneNone
FabioJuly 31 – August 3Tropical storm50 (85)1000NoneNoneNone
GilmaAugust 1 – 3Tropical storm40 (65)1004NoneNoneNone
HectorAugust 15 – 23Category 2 hurricane110 (175)966NoneNoneNone
Ioke August 20 – 27, [nb 3] Category 5 hurricane160 (260)915 Johnston Atoll, Wake Island, Minamitorishima, Southern Alaska 88None
IleanaAugust 21 – 27Category 3 hurricane125 (205)951 Socorro Island Minimal1
John August 28 – September 4Category 4 hurricane130 (215)948 Guerrero, Michoacán, Baja California Sur, Arizona, California, New Mexico, Texas 60.95
Kristy August 30 – September 8Category 1 hurricane80 (130)985NoneNoneNone
Lane September 13 – 17Category 3 hurricane125 (205)952Southwestern Mexico, Western Mexico, Northwestern Mexico, Southwestern United States 2034
MiriamSeptember 16 – 18Tropical storm45 (75)999NoneNoneNone
Two-CSeptember 19 – 20Tropical depression35 (55)1007NoneNoneNone
Three-CSeptember 26 – 27Tropical depression35 (55)1008NoneNoneNone
Norman October 9 – 15Tropical storm50 (85)1000Southwestern Mexico, [nb 4] Western MexicoNoneNone
OliviaOctober 9 – 12Tropical storm45 (75)1000NoneNoneNone
Four-COctober 13 – 14Tropical depression35 (55)1007NoneNoneNone
Paul October 21 – 26Category 2 hurricane105 (165)970 Oaxaca, Guerrero, Baja California Sur, Sinaloa 3.24
Eighteen-EOctober 26 – 27Tropical depression35 (55)1007NoneNoneNone
RosaNovember 8 – 10Tropical storm40 (65)1002NoneNoneNone
Twenty-ENovember 11Tropical depression35 (55)1007NoneNoneNone
Sergio November 13 – 20Category 2 hurricane110 (175)965 Guerrero NoneNone
Season Aggregates
25 systemsMay 27 – November 20 160 (260)915355.114 

See also

Notes

  1. The totals represent the sum of the squares for every (sub)tropical storm's intensity of over 33 knots (38 mph, 61 km/h), divided by 10,000. Calculations are provided at Talk:2006 Pacific hurricane season/ACE calcs.
  2. Rainfall totals are rounded to the nearest 1/100th of an inch and to the nearest millimetre.
  3. Though Hurricane Ioke did not make landfall, its strike on Wake Island is included in the table, due to the severe damage on the island.
  4. In its report on Tropical Storm Norman, the National Hurricane Center did not specify whether the storm moved ashore or not. However, in its report to the World Meteorological Organization, officials from Mexico included Norman in the storms that moved ashore along the country.

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The 1989 Pacific hurricane season officially started on May 15, 1989, in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1989, in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1989. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. A total of 17 storms and 9 hurricanes formed, which was near long-term averages. Four hurricanes reached major hurricane status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale.

1988 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1988 Pacific hurricane season was a Pacific hurricane season that saw a below-average amount of tropical cyclones form, the first time since 1981. It officially began May 15, in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, in the central Pacific and lasted until November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The first named storm, Tropical Storm Aletta, formed on June 16, and the last-named storm, Tropical Storm Miriam, was previously named Hurricane Joan in the Atlantic Ocean before crossing Central America and re-emerging in the eastern Pacific; Miriam continued westward and dissipated on November 2.

2007 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2007 Pacific hurricane season was a below-average Pacific hurricane season, featuring one major hurricane. The season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific and on June 1 in the central Pacific, and ended on November 30; these dates conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the region. The first tropical cyclone of the season, Alvin, developed on May 27, while the final system of the year, Kiko, dissipated on October 23. Due to unusually strong wind shear, activity fell short of the long-term average, with a total of 11 named storms, 4 hurricanes, and 1 major hurricane. At the time, 2007 featured the second-lowest value of the Accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index since reliable records began in 1971. Two tropical cyclones – Cosme and Flossie – crossed into the central Pacific basin during the year, activity below the average of 4 to 5 systems.

2012 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2012 Pacific hurricane season was a moderately active Pacific hurricane season that saw an unusually high number of tropical cyclones pass west of the Baja California Peninsula. The season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1 in the central Pacific, and ended on November 30; these dates conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. However, with the formation of Tropical Storm Aletta on May 14 the season slightly exceeded these bounds.

Hurricane Kenneth (2005) Category 4 Pacific hurricane in 2005

Hurricane Kenneth was the strongest and longest-tracked hurricane of the 2005 Pacific hurricane season. The eleventh named storm and fifth hurricane of the season, Kenneth developed from a disturbance in the Intertropical Convergence Zone to the southwest of Mexico on September 14. It quickly attained peak winds of 135 mph (215 km/h) on September 18, before weakening due to increased wind shear and turning to a southwest drift. After weakening to tropical storm status, Kenneth attained a steady west-northwest motion and encountered favorable enough conditions for it to gain power and attain hurricane status on September 25. The cyclone again weakened as its motion halted, and on September 30 Kenneth dissipated a short distance off the Big Island of Hawaii. The remnants of Kenneth produced one of the highest rainfall totals in Hawaii, reaching up to 12 inches (305 mm) on Oahu. The rainfall caused flooding, though no major damage was reported.

Tropical Storm Norman (2006) Pacific tropical storm in 2006

Tropical Storm Norman was a weak tropical cyclone that brought heavy rainfall to southwestern Mexico in October 2006. The twelfth named storm of the 2006 Pacific hurricane season, Norman developed on October 9 from a tropical wave well to the southwest of Mexico. Unfavorable conditions quickly encountered the system, and within two days of forming, Norman dissipated as its remnants turned to the east. Thunderstorms gradually increased again, as it interacted with a disturbance to its east, and on October 15 the cyclone regenerated just off the coast of Mexico. The center became disorganized and quickly dissipated, bringing a large area of moisture which dropped up to 6 inches (150 mm) of rainfall to southwestern Mexico. Rainfall from the storm flooded about 150 houses, of which 20 were destroyed. One person was injured, and initially there were reports of two people missing due to the storm; however, it was not later confirmed.

Tropical Storm Julio (2008) Pacific tropical storm in 2008

Tropical Storm Julio was a tropical storm that made landfall on the southern tip of Baja California Sur in August 2008. The tenth named storm of the 2008 Pacific hurricane season, it developed from a tropical wave on August 23 off the coast of Mexico. It moved parallel to the coast, reaching peak winds of 50 mph (85 km/h) before moving ashore and weakening. On August 26 it dissipated in the Gulf of California. Julio was the third tropical cyclone to make landfall in the Pacific Ocean basin during the season, after Tropical Storm Alma, which struck Nicaragua in May, and Tropical Depression Five-E, which moved ashore along southwestern Mexico in July. The storm brought locally heavy rainfall to southern Baja California, killing one person and leaving several towns isolated. Moisture from Julio reached Arizona, producing thunderstorms, including one which damaged ten small planes in Chandler.

Hurricane Nora (2003) Category 2 Pacific hurricane in 2003

Hurricane Nora was the final of five tropical cyclones to make landfall in the 2003 Pacific hurricane season. The fourteenth named storm and fifth hurricane of the season, Nora developed on October 1 from a tropical wave. It slowly intensified as it moved northwestward, intensifying into a hurricane on October 4. That day, Nora rapidly intensified to its peak of 100 mph (160 km/h), but the larger Hurricane Olaf to its east prevented further strengthening. An approaching trough turned the rapidly weakening system to the east toward Mexico. By October 7, it was downgraded to a tropical depression. Although it no longer met the criteria for being a tropical cyclone, the National Hurricane Center continued issuing advisories due to the cyclone's proximity with land. Nora unexpectedly redeveloped an area of thunderstorms and moved ashore near Mazatlán, Sinaloa on October 9 before dissipating. The depression dropped locally heavy rainfall in western Mexico, but there were no reports of damage. Later, the remnants combined with Olaf and an upper-level low to produce flooding and a tornado in central Texas.

Hurricane Kristy (2006) Category 1 Pacific hurricane in 2006

Hurricane Kristy in 2006 was a relatively long-lived tropical cyclone in the 2006 Pacific hurricane season. It developed on August 30 from a tropical wave off the southwest coast of Mexico, and quickly intensified to attain hurricane status, reaching peak winds of 80 mph (130 km/h). Subsequently, Kristy weakened from cooler waters and increased wind shear from Hurricane John to its northeast. Steering currents weakened, and turning to a southerly drift, it weakened to a tropical depression by September 2. The next day it briefly regained tropical storm status, only to again deteriorate to depression status. After turning to the west, Kristy encountered marginally favorable conditions and attained tropical storm status for a third time, though unfavorable conditions caused it to dissipate on September 9. The storm never affected land, although initially there was a slight threat to Clarion Island. Within the National Hurricane Center area of warning responsibility east of 140°W, Hurricane Kristy was the longest-lasting tropical cyclone of the season.

2009 Pacific hurricane season hurricane season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2009 Pacific hurricane season was the most active Pacific hurricane season since 1994. The season officially started on May 15 in the East Pacific Ocean, and on June 1 in the Central Pacific; they both ended on November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Pacific basin. However, the formation of tropical cyclones is possible at any time of the year.

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