38th New Zealand Parliament

Last updated

38th Parliament of New Zealand
37th Parliament 39th Parliament

Parliament House, Wellington, New Zealand (50).JPG

Overview
Term 22 June 1976 – 6 October 1978
Election New Zealand general election, 1975
Government Third National Government
House of Representatives

New Zealand 38th Parliament.png

Members 87
Speaker of the House Richard Harrison
––Roy Jack until 24 December 1977 †
Prime Minister Robert Muldoon
Leader of the Opposition Bill Rowling
Sovereign
Monarch HM Elizabeth II
Governor-General HE Rt Hon. Sir Keith Holyoake from 26 October 1977
––HE Sir Denis Blundell until 5 October 1977

The 38th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1975 general election on 29 November of that year.

New Zealand Parliament legislative body of New Zealand

The New Zealand Parliament is the legislature of New Zealand, consisting of the Queen of New Zealand (Queen-in-Parliament) and the New Zealand House of Representatives. The Queen is usually represented by a governor-general. Before 1951, there was an upper chamber, the New Zealand Legislative Council. The Parliament was established in 1854 and is one of the oldest continuously functioning legislatures in the world.

Contents

1975 general election

The 1975 general election was held on Saturday, 29 November. [1] A total of 92 MPs were elected; 63 represented North Island electorates, 25 represented South Island electorates, and the remaining four represented Māori electorates; this was an increase in the number of MPs by five since the 1972 election, and the gain was all for the North Island. [2] 1,953,050 voters were enrolled and the official turnout at the election was 82.5%. [1]

A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title. Member of Congress is an equivalent term in other jurisdictions.

North Island More northern, and smaller, of the two main islands of New Zealand

The North Island, also officially named Te Ika-a-Māui, is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, separated from the larger but much less populous South Island by Cook Strait. The island's area is 113,729 square kilometres (43,911 sq mi), making it the world's 14th-largest island. It has a population of 3,749,200.

South Island southernmost and largest of the two main islands in New Zealand

The South Island, also officially named Te Waipounamu, is the larger of the two major islands of New Zealand in surface area; the other being the smaller but more populous North Island. It is bordered to the north by Cook Strait, to the west by the Tasman Sea, and to the south and east by the Pacific Ocean. The South Island covers 150,437 square kilometres (58,084 sq mi), making it the world's 12th-largest island. It has a temperate climate.

Sessions

The 38th Parliament sat for four sessions (there were two sessions in 1977), and was prorogued on 7 October 1978. [3]

Session Opened Adjouned
first 22 June 1976 14 December 1976
second 28 February 1977 28 February 1977
third 19 May 1977 16 December 1977
fourth 10 May 1978 6 October 1978

Ministries

The Labour Party, which had come to power at the 1972 election, was defeated by the National Party at the 1975 election. Robert Muldoon formed the third National Government and led the Muldoon Ministry until National's defeat at the 1984 election. [4]

The New Zealand Labour Party, or simply Labour, is a centre-left political party in New Zealand. The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism, while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice. It is a participant of the international Progressive Alliance.

New Zealand National Party Major New Zealand political party

The New Zealand National Party, shortened to National or the Nats, is a centre-right political party in New Zealand. It is one of two major parties that dominate contemporary New Zealand politics, alongside its traditional rival, the New Zealand Labour Party.

Overview of seats

The table below shows the number of MPs in each party following the 1975 election and at dissolution:

AffiliationMembers
At 1975 election At dissolution
National 5554
Government total
Labour 3232
Social Credit 01
Government total 3233
Total
8787
Working Government majority 2321

Notes

Initial composition of the 38th Parliament

The table below shows the results of the 1975 general election:

Key

  National     Labour     Social Credit   

Electorate results for the New Zealand general election, 1975 [5]
Electorate Incumbent Winner Majority Runner up
General electorates
Auckland Central Norman Douglas Richard Prebble 289 Murray McCully
Avon Mary Batchelor 5,503 T P George
Awarua Aubrey Begg Rex Austin 2,150 Aubrey Begg
Bay of Plenty Percy Allen Duncan MacIntyre 3,960 R F McKee
Birkenhead Norman King Jim McLay 2,816 Norman King
Christchurch Central Bruce Barclay 2,973 T G B Armitage
Clutha Peter Gordon 4,735 F A O'Connell
Coromandel Leo Schultz 4,724 R L Bradley
Dunedin Central Brian MacDonell 1,428 A R Bright
Dunedin North Ethel McMillan Richard Walls 958 Brian Arnold
East Coast Bays Frank Gill 5,594 Rex Stanton
Eden Mike Moore Aussie Malcolm 1,331 Mike Moore
Egmont Venn Young 4,120 Dennis Duggan
Franklin Bill Birch 7,605 Ron Ng-Waishing
Gisborne Trevor Davey Bob Bell 1,321 Trevor Davey
Grey Lynn Eddie Isbey 2,839 Jens Meder
Hamilton East Rufus Rogers Ian Shearer 2,246 Rufus Rogers
Hamilton West Dorothy Jelicich Mike Minogue 2,069 Dorothy Jelicich
Hastings Richard Mayson Robert Fenton 491 Richard Mayson
Hawkes Bay Richard Harrison 3,805 David Butcher
Henderson Martyn Finlay 401 Warren Adams
Heretaunga Ron Bailey 336 Julie Cameron [6]
Hobson Logan Sloane Neill Austin 4,101 Howard Manning [nb 1]
Hutt Trevor Young 1,019 Brett Newell
Invercargill J. B. Munro Norman Jones 2,533 J. B. Munro
Island Bay Gerald O'Brien 1,274 Bill Nathan
Kapiti Frank O'Flynn Barry Brill 2,222 Frank O'Flynn
Karori Jack Marshall Hugh Templeton 4,830 Margaret Shields
King Country Jim Bolger 4,316 T D Varnam
Lyttelton Tom McGuigan Colleen Dewe 999 Tom McGuigan
Manawatu Allan McCready 2,918 A C Eyles
Mangere Colin Moyle 1,604 S A Lawson
Manukau Roger Douglas 678 B R Leaming
Manurewa Phil Amos Merv Wellington 1,358 Phil Amos
Marlborough Ian Brooks Edward Latter 3,010 Ian Brooks
Miramar Bill Young 1,749 John Wybrow
Mt Albert Warren Freer 247 Frank Ryan
Napier Gordon Christie 931 J K W Isles
Nelson Stanley Whitehead 1,093 I D McWhannel
New Lynn Jonathan Hunt 890 B J O'Connor
New Plymouth Ron Barclay Tony Friedlander 1,935 Ron Barclay
North Shore George Gair 5,247 Wyn Hoadley
Oamaru Bill Laney Jonathan Elworthy 2,196 W R Laney
Onehunga Hugh Watt Frank Rogers 1,044 K A O'Brien
Otago Central Ian Quigley Warren Cooper 2,371 Ian Quigley
Otahuhu Bob Tizard 3,785 Mrs L E Morris
Pahiatua Keith Holyoake 6,769 R A Garden
Pakuranga Gavin Downie 7,016 Geoff Braybrooke
Palmerston North Joe Walding John Lithgow 142 Joe Walding
Papanui Bert Walker 2,985 Rod Garden
Petone Fraser Colman 2,834 B R Gluyas
Piako Jack Luxton 6,174 Helen Clark
Porirua Gerard Wall 2,265 Ross Doughty
Raglan Douglas Carter Marilyn Waring 3,756 Bill Pickering
Rakaia Colin McLachlan 5,237 Graeme Lowrie
Rangiora Kerry Burke Derek Quigley 1,386 Kerry Burke
Rangitikei Roy Jack 1,756 Bruce Beetham
Remuera Allan Highet 8,656 G B Mead
Riccarton Eric Holland 4,766 D A Johnson
Rodney Peter Wilkinson 7,817 John Prebble
Roskill Arthur Faulkner 530 John Maurice Priestley [7]
Rotorua Harry Lapwood 3,605 Peter Tapsell
Ruahine Les Gandar 2,763 Rex Willing
St Albans Roger Drayton 1,570 Ms P R Rotherberg
St Kilda William Fraser 1,890 Gordon Heslop
South Canterbury Rob Talbot 4,301 N B Lambert
Stratford David Thomson 5,667 P P Hopkins
Sydenham John Kirk 3,817 P K Matheson
Tamaki Robert Muldoon 6,735 C T Kaye
Tasman Bill Rowling 529 Peter Malone
Taupo Jack Ridley Ray La Varis 1,614 Jack Ridley
Tauranga Keith Allen 4,843 Richard Hendry
Timaru Basil Arthur 1,011 D A J Walker
Waikato Lance Adams-Schneider 7,073 B G West
Wairarapa Jack Williams Ben Couch 1,468 Jack Williams
Waitemata Michael Bassett Dail Jones 1,385 Michael Bassett
Wallace Brian Talboys 6,978 I D Lamont
Wanganui Russell Marshall 1,244 J G Rowan
Wellington Central Ken Comber 1,076 David Shand
West Coast Paddy Blanchfield 2,401 Barry Dallas
Western Hutt Henry May Brian Lambert 109 Henry May
Whangarei Murray Smith John Elliott 2,710 Murray Smith
Wigram Mick Connelly 1,967 P N Russell
Māori electorates
Eastern Maori Paraone Reweti 6,261 M Searancke
Northern Maori Matiu Rata 4,151 Winston Peters
Southern Maori Whetu Tirikatene-Sullivan 6,452 Willard Amaru
Western Maori Koro Wētere 8,925 E S Rangi

Table footnotes:

  1. David Lange came third for Labour in Hobson

By-elections during 38th Parliament

There were a number of changes during the term of the 38th Parliament.

Electorate and by-election Date Incumbent Cause Winner
Nelson 1976 28 February Stanley Whitehead Death Mel Courtney
Mangere 1977 26 March Colin Moyle Resignation David Lange
Pahiatua 1977 30 April Keith Holyoake Appointed as Governor-General John Falloon
Rangitikei 1978 18 February Roy Jack Death Bruce Beetham

Notes

  1. 1 2 "General elections 1853–2005 - dates & turnout". Elections New Zealand. Archived from the original on 27 May 2010. Retrieved 2 December 2012.
  2. Wilson 1985, p. 173.
  3. Wilson 1985, p. 142.
  4. Wilson 1985, pp. 89–94.
  5. Norton 1988, pp. ?.
  6. Gustafson 1986, p. 358.
  7. Gustafson 1986, p. 382.

Related Research Articles

1975 New Zealand general election

The 1975 New Zealand general election was held on 29 November to elect MPs to the 38th session of the New Zealand Parliament. It was the first general election in New Zealand where 18- to 20-year-olds and all permanent residents of New Zealand were eligible to vote, although only citizens were able to be elected.

1978 New Zealand general election

The 1978 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to elect the 39th New Zealand Parliament. It saw the governing National Party, led by Robert Muldoon, retain office, but the opposition Labour Party won the largest share of the vote. Reorganisation of the enrolment system caused major problems with the electoral rolls, which left a legacy of unreliable information about voting levels in this election.

1969 New Zealand general election

The 1969 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of Parliament's 36th term. It saw the Second National Government headed by Prime Minister Keith Holyoake of the National Party win a fourth consecutive term.

1946 New Zealand general election

The 1946 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 28th term. It saw the governing Labour Party re-elected, but by a substantially narrower margin than in the three previous elections. The National Party continued its gradual rise.

1954 New Zealand general election

The 1954 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 31st term. It saw the governing National Party remain in office, but with a slightly reduced majority. It also saw the debut of the new Social Credit Party, which won more than eleven percent of the vote but failed to win a seat.

1960 New Zealand general election

The 1960 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 33rd term. It saw the governing Labour Party defeated by the National Party, putting an end to the short second Labour government.

41st New Zealand Parliament

The 41st New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. Its composition was determined by the 1984 elections, and it sat until the 1987 elections.

40th New Zealand Parliament

The 40th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. Its composition was determined by the 1981 elections, and it sat until the 1984 elections.

Mount Albert (New Zealand electorate) New Zealand Parliamentary electorate

Mount Albert is a parliamentary electorate in Auckland, New Zealand, returning one Member of Parliament (MP) to the New Zealand House of Representatives. It was represented by David Shearer from 13 June 2009 to 31 December 2016. It was represented by Helen Clark from the 1981 general election until her resignation from Parliament on 17 April 2009. It has elected only Labour Party MPs since it was first contested at the 1946 election. The current representative is the Prime Minister and Labour Party leader, Jacinda Ardern, who was elected in a 2017 by-election gaining 77 percent of votes cast in the preliminary results.

29th New Zealand Parliament

The 29th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. It opened in 1950, following the 1949 general election. It was dissolved in 1951 in preparation for the 1951 general election. The governing Labour Party had been defeated in the election by the National Party. This marked the end of the First Labour government and the beginning of the First National government.

20th New Zealand Parliament

The 20th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1919 general election in December of that year.

28th New Zealand Parliament

The 28th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1946 general election in November of that year.

30th New Zealand Parliament

The 30th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1951 general election on 1 September of that year.

31st New Zealand Parliament

The 31st New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1954 general election on 13 November of that year.

32nd New Zealand Parliament

The 32nd New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1957 general election on 30 November of that year.

33rd New Zealand Parliament

The 33rd New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1960 general election on 26 November of that year.

34th New Zealand Parliament

The 34th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1963 general election on 30 November of that year.

35th New Zealand Parliament

The 35th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1966 general election on 26 November of that year.

36th New Zealand Parliament

The 36th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1969 general election on 29 November of that year.

37th New Zealand Parliament

The 37th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1972 general election on 25 November of that year.

References


Barry Selwyn Gustafson is a New Zealand political scientist and historian, and a leading political biographer. He served for nearly four decades as Professor of Political Studies at the University of Auckland, and as Acting Director of the New Zealand Asia Institute from 2004 to 2006. He has contested various general elections, first for the Labour Party and later for the National Party, coming second each time.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.