Chairman of Committees (New Zealand House of Representatives)

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The Chairman of Committees was an elected position of the New Zealand House of Representatives. The role existed between 1854 and 1992. The roles of the Chairman of Committees were to deputise for the Speaker, and to chair the House when it was in committee. The role is now carried out by the Deputy Speaker. The role of Chairman of Committees also existed for the Legislative Council.

Contents

Establishment

The position was established during the first session of the 1st New Zealand Parliament. Parliament first convened on 24 May 1854, [1] and on 21 June of that year, Auckland lawyer Frederick Merriman was elected as its first Chairman of Committees. [2] The role also existed for the Legislative Council, was established in 1865 and first held by Mathew Richmond. [3]

Role

The chief role of the Chairman of Committees was to chair the House when it was in committee (i.e., considering a bill at committee stage) or preside in the absence of the Speaker or when the Speaker so requested. These arrangements were based on those of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom. [4]

The Chairman of Committees ceased to hold office on the dissolution of Parliament, but was remunerated until the next Parliament first met, when it then had a chance to elect a new chairman. [5] [6]

Until 1992, the Chairman of Committees was known as the Deputy Speaker only when presiding over the House. That year, the position of Deputy Speaker was made official under the Standing Orders, and the role of Chairman of Committees was discontinued. [5] The first Deputy Speaker was appointed on 10 November 1992. [7]

Office holders

The following is a list of Chairmen of Committees of the House of Representatives: [8] [9]

Key

  Independent     Liberal     Reform     United     Labour     National   

No.NamePortraitTerm start and end datesParliament
1 Frederick Merriman Frederick W Merriman.jpg 21 June 185415 September 1855 1st
2 Hugh Carleton Hugh Francis Carleton, ca 1870s.jpg 17 April 18565 November 1860 2nd
11 June 186127 January 1866 3rd
4 July 186630 December 1870 4th
3 Maurice O'Rorke 1 George Maurice O'Rorke.jpg 16 August 187123 October 1872 5th
4 Arthur Seymour Arthur Seymour, NZETC.jpg 16 July 187314 May 1875
(3)Maurice O'Rorke George Maurice O'Rorke.jpg 21 July 18756 December 1875
28 June 187611 July 1879 6th
(4)Arthur Seymour Arthur Seymour, NZETC.jpg 16 July 187915 August 1879
26 September 18798 November 1881 7th
5 Ebenezer Hamlin Ebenezer Hamlin, 1882.jpg 30 May 188227 June 1884 8th
5 September 188415 July 1887 9th
13 October 18873 October 1890 10th
6 Westby Perceval Westby Brook Perceval, 1890.jpg 23 June 189115 September 1891 11th
7 William Lee Rees William Lee Rees.jpg 18 September 189111 July 1893
8 Arthur Guinness 1 Arthur Robert Guinness, 1880s.jpg 13 July 18938 November 1893
10 July 189414 November 1896 12th
9 April 189715 November 1899 13th
3 July 19005 November 1902 14th
9 John A. Millar John Andrew Millar.jpg 2 July 190315 November 1905 15th
10 Roderick McKenzie Roderick McKenzie 1900's.jpg 31 August 190629 October 1908 16th
11 Thomas Wilford Thomas Wilford, 1909.jpg 12 June 19098 July 1910 17th
12 James Colvin James Colvin.jpg 23 August 191020 November 1911
13 Frederic Lang 1 Frederic Lang.jpg 2 August 191226 June 1913 18th
14 Alexander Malcolm No image.png 4 July 191320 November 1914
7 July 191527 November 1919 19th
15 July 192030 November 1922 20th
15 Alexander Young Alexander Young.jpg 24 July 192314 October 1925 21st
16 Frank Hockly Frank Franklin Hockly, 1922.jpg 2 July 192618 October 1928 22nd
17 Sydney George Smith Sydney George Smith, year unknown.jpg 11 December 192828 May 1930 23rd
18 William Bodkin William Bodkin, 1935.jpg 27 June 193027 October 1931
(17)Sydney George Smith Sydney George Smith, year unknown.jpg 27 October 193112 November 1931
26 February 193212 February 1935 24th
19 Jimmy Nash James Alfred Nash, 1928.jpg 13 February 19351 November 1935
20 Ted Howard Ted Howard.jpg 1 April 193620 September 1938 25th
21 Robert McKeen 1 Robert McKeen, 1935.jpg 29 June 193930 August 1943 26th
1 March 19444 November 1946 27th
22 Clyde Carr Clyde Carr.jpg 24 June 19473 November 1949 28th
23 Cyril Harker No image.png 29 June 195027 July 1951 29th
28 September 19515 October 1954 30th
30 March 195529 October 1957 31st
24 Reginald Keeling [10] Reginald Keeling.jpg 22 January 195831 October 1960 32nd
25 Roy Jack 1 Roy Jack.jpg 23 June 196129 October 1963 33rd
12 June 196425 October 1966 34th
26 John Hannibal George No image.png 28 April 196728 October 1969 35th
27 Alfred E. Allen 1 No image.png 13 March 19707 June 1972 36th
28 Richard Harrison 1 Richard Harrison MP.png 8 June 197226 October 1972
29 Ron Bailey Ron Bailey.jpg 16 February 197310 September 1974 37th
30 Jonathan Hunt 1 Jonathan Hunt 1986.jpg 17 September 197430 October 1975
(28) Richard Harrison 1 Richard Harrison MP.png 24 June 19769 May 1978 38th
31 Jack Luxton No image.png 12 May 197826 October 1978
18 May 197929 October 1981 39th
8 April 198215 June 1984 40th
32 John Terris [9] Mr J Terris.jpg 17 August 198429 July 1987 41st
17 September 198710 September 1990 42nd
33 Jim Gerard [9] No image.png 29 November 199010 November 1992 43rd

1 Also served as Speaker

Deputy Chairman of Committees

The position of Deputy Chairman of Committees was created in 1975. [11] After the role of chairman was replaced by that of Deputy Speaker in 1992, the third presiding officer of the House continued to be known as the deputy chairman for several more years, [12] [13] until the final holder of the office, Peter Hilt, became the first MP to be appointed Assistant Speaker on 21 February 1996. [14]

Key

   National    Labour    United NZ

List of Deputy Chairmen of Committees
No.NameTerm start and end datesParliament
1 Ron Barclay [11] 26 March 197530 October 1975 37th
2 Bill Birch [11] 24 June 197626 October 1978 38th
3 Tony Friedlander [11] 13 June 197929 October 1981 39th
4 Dail Jones [11] 8 April 198215 June 1984 40th
5 Trevor Young [11] [15] 17 August 198429 July 1987 41st
17 September 198710 September 1990 42nd
6 Robert Anderson [16] 29 November 199023 September 1993 43rd
7 Joy McLauchlan [12] 22 December 199327 February 1995 44th
8 Peter Hilt [13] 1 March 199521 February 1996

Notes

  1. Scholefield 1950, p. 68.
  2. Scholefield 1950, p. 151.
  3. Scholefield 1950, p. 89.
  4. McLintock 1966.
  5. 1 2 "Members' Conditions Of Service". New Zealand Parliament. Retrieved 19 February 2011.
  6. "Speaker of House of Representatives and Chairman of Committees". Knowledge Basket New Zealand. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 19 February 2011.
  7. "Speaker of the House of Representatives". New Zealand Parliament. Retrieved 19 February 2011.
  8. Wilson 1985, pp. 251–252.
  9. 1 2 3 Refer to the talk page for Chairmen post–1984
  10. Hancock, Mervyn (December 2005). "George Hamish Ormond Wilson : Member of Parliament for Palmerston North 1960–67" (PDF). Palmerston North Library. p. 375. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 April 2012. Retrieved 28 December 2011.
  11. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Wilson 1985, p. 253.
  12. 1 2 Hansard. Vol. 539. New Zealand Parliament. 1994. p. 22.
  13. 1 2 Hansard. Vol. 546. New Zealand Parliament. 1995. p. 137.
  14. Hansard. Vol. 552. New Zealand Parliament. 1996. p. 75.
  15. Hansard. Vol. 483. New Zealand Parliament. 1987. p. 10.
  16. Hansard. Vol. 511. New Zealand Parliament. 1990. p. 16.

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