35th New Zealand Parliament

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35th Parliament of New Zealand
34th Parliament 36th Parliament

Parliament House, Wellington, New Zealand (50).JPG

Overview
Term 26 April 1967 – 24 October 1969
Election New Zealand general election, 1966
Government Second National Government
House of Representatives

New Zealand 35th Parliament.png

Members 80
Speaker of the House Roy Jack
Prime Minister Keith Holyoake
Leader of the Opposition Norman Kirk
Sovereign
Monarch HM Elizabeth II
Governor-General Sir Arthur Porritt from 1 December 1967
––HE Brigadier Sir Bernard Edward Fergusson until 20 October 1967

The 35th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1966 general election on 26 November of that year.

New Zealand Parliament legislative body of New Zealand

The New Zealand Parliament is the legislature of New Zealand, consisting of the Queen of New Zealand (Queen-in-Parliament) and the New Zealand House of Representatives. The Queen is usually represented by a governor-general. Before 1951, there was an upper chamber, the New Zealand Legislative Council. The Parliament was established in 1854 and is one of the oldest continuously functioning legislatures in the world.

Contents

1966 general election

The 1966 general election was held on Saturday, 26 November. [1] A total of 80 MPs were elected; 52 represented North Island electorates, 24 represented South Island electorates, and the remaining four represented Māori electorates; this was the same distribution used since the 1963 election. [2] 1,409,600 voters were enrolled and the official turnout at the election was 86.0%. [1]

North Island More northern, and smaller, of the two main islands of New Zealand

The North Island, also officially named Te Ika-a-Māui, is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, separated from the larger but much less populous South Island by Cook Strait. The island's area is 113,729 square kilometres (43,911 sq mi), making it the world's 14th-largest island. It has a population of 3,749,200.

South Island southernmost and largest of the two main islands in New Zealand

The South Island, also officially named Te Waipounamu, is the larger of the two major islands of New Zealand in surface area; the other being the smaller but more populous North Island. It is bordered to the north by Cook Strait, to the west by the Tasman Sea, and to the south and east by the Pacific Ocean. The South Island covers 150,437 square kilometres (58,084 sq mi), making it the world's 12th-largest island. It has a temperate climate.

Māori electorates

In New Zealand politics, Māori electorates, colloquially known as the Māori seats, are a special category of electorate that gives reserved positions to representatives of Māori in the New Zealand Parliament. Every area in New Zealand is covered by both a general and a Māori electorate; there are currently seven Māori electorates. Since 1967 candidates in Māori electorates have not needed to be Māori themselves, but to register as a voter in the Māori electorates people need to declare they are of Māori descent.

Sessions

The 35th Parliament sat for three sessions, and was prorogued on 24 October 1969. [3]

Session Opened Adjouned
first 26 April 1967 24 November 1967
second 26 June 1968 19 December 1968
third 15 May 1969 24 October 1969

Ministries

The National Party had come to power at the 1960 election, and Keith Holyoake had formed the second Holyoake Ministry on 12 December 1960, which stayed in power until Holyoake stepped down in early 1972. The second National Government remained in place until its defeat at the 1972 election towards the end of that year. [4]

New Zealand National Party Major New Zealand political party

The New Zealand National Party, shortened to National or the Nats, is a centre-right political party in New Zealand. It is one of two major parties that dominate contemporary New Zealand politics, alongside its traditional rival, the New Zealand Labour Party.

Keith Holyoake 20th-century Viceroy, Prime Minister of New Zealand, politician

Sir Keith Jacka Holyoake was the 26th Prime Minister of New Zealand, serving for a brief period in 1957 and then from 1960 to 1972, and also the 13th Governor-General of New Zealand, serving from 1977 to 1980. He is the only New Zealand politician to date to have held both positions.


Overview of seats

The table below shows the number of MPs in each party following the 1966 election and at dissolution:

AffiliationMembers
At 1966 election At dissolution
National 4443
Government total
Labour Opposition 3536
Social Credit 11
Opposition total 3637
Total
8080
Working Government majority 86

Notes

By-elections during 35th Parliament

There were a number of changes during the term of the 35th Parliament.

Electorate and by-election Date Incumbent Cause Winner
Southern Maori 1967 11 March Eruera Tirikatene Death Whetu Tirikatene-Sullivan
Fendalton 1967 15 April Harry Lake Death Eric Holland
Petone 1967 15 April Michael Moohan Death Fraser Colman
Eastern Maori 1967 12 August Puti Tipene Watene Death Paraone Reweti
Palmerston North 1967 2 December Bill Brown Death Joe Walding
Hutt 1968 3 August Walter Nash Death Trevor Young

Notes

  1. 1 2 "General elections 1853–2005 - dates & turnout". Elections New Zealand. Archived from the original on 27 May 2010. Retrieved 2 December 2012.
  2. Wilson 1985, p. 173.
  3. Wilson 1985, p. 142.
  4. Wilson 1985, pp. 89–92.

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References

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