I've Got a Crush on You

Last updated
"I've Got a Crush on You"
Song
Published1930 by New World Music
Composer(s) George Gershwin
Lyricist(s) Ira Gershwin

"I've Got a Crush on You" is a song composed by George Gershwin, with lyrics by Ira Gershwin. It is unique among Gershwin compositions in that it was used for two different Broadway productions: Treasure Girl (1928), when it was introduced by Clifton Webb and Mary Hay, and Strike Up the Band (1930), when it was sung by Doris Carson and Gordon Smith. [1] It was later included in the tribute musical Nice Work If You Can Get It (2012), in which it was sung by Jennifer Laura Thompson. When covered by Frank Sinatra he was a part of Columbia records.

Contents

It is considered a jazz standard, primarily of the vocal repertoire, thanks to recordings by singers such as Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald. Instrumental versions have also been recorded by Nat Adderley, Ike Quebec and others.

Notable recordings

Film appearances

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References

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  3. Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p.  416. ISBN   0-89820-083-0.
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  5. "Frank Sinatra Discography". jazzdiscography.com. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  6. Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p.  392. ISBN   0-89820-083-0.
  7. "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  8. "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved October 10, 2017.
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