List of rivers of Panama

Last updated

This is a list of rivers in Panama .

By drainage basin

This list is arranged by drainage basin, with respective tributaries indented under each larger stream's name.

Drainage basin Area of land where precipitation collects and drains off into a common outlet

A drainage basin is any area of land where precipitation collects and drains off into a common outlet, such as into a river, bay, or other body of water. The drainage basin includes all the surface water from rain runoff, snowmelt, and nearby streams that run downslope towards the shared outlet, as well as the groundwater underneath the earth's surface. Drainage basins connect into other drainage basins at lower elevations in a hierarchical pattern, with smaller sub-drainage basins, which in turn drain into another common outlet.

Contents

Atlantic Ocean

The Chagres River as seen from the Rainforest Resort in Gamboa, Panama Chagres.jpg
The Chagres River as seen from the Rainforest Resort in Gamboa, Panama
Sixaola River river in Costa Rica

The Sixaola River is a river in southern Limón Province, Costa Rica. It flows from the Cordillera Talamanca to the Caribbean Sea northeast of Sixaola at 9°34′20″N82°33′54″W. The river's headwaters are part of the La Amistad International Park. For part of its length, the river forms the border between Limón Province, Costa Rica and Bocas del Toro Province, Panama. An old railroad bridge spans the river between Guabito, Panama, and Sixaola, Costa Rica. This bridge is a border crossing between Costa Rica and Panama. Tourists use the border crossing when travelling between Costa Rica and Bocas del Toro.

Yorkin River is a river of Costa Rica and Panama.

The Changuinola River is a river of Panama.

Pacific Ocean

Chucunaque River is the longest river in Panama Rio Chucunaque.jpg
Chucunaque River is the longest river in Panama

The Chiriquí Viejo River is a river of Panama.

The David River is a river of Panama.

The Majagua River is a river of Panama.

Coiba Island

the island has 5 rivers flowing separately into the Pacific Ocean.

Related Research Articles

San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico Municipality of Puerto Rico (U.S.)

San Lorenzo is a municipality of Puerto Rico (U.S.) located in the eastern central region, north of Patillas and Yabucoa; south of Gurabo; east of Caguas and Cayey; and west of Juncos and Las Piedras. San Lorenzo is spread over twelve wards and San Lorenzo Pueblo. It is part of the San Juan-Caguas-Guaynabo Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Santa Clara may refer to:

Municipalities of Venezuela

Municipalities of Venezuela are subdivisions of the States of Venezuela. There are 335 municipalities dividing the 23 states and Capital District.

San Juan Bautista Tuxtepec Place in Oaxaca, Mexico

San Juan Bautista Tuxtepec, or simply referred to as Tuxtepec, is the head of the municipality by the same name and is the second most populous city of the Mexican state of Oaxaca. It is part of the Tuxtepec District of the Papaloapan Region. As of the 2005 census, the city is home to a population of 94,209 and 144,555 in the municipality, though census data are often under reported for various reasons. The municipality resides in the region called La Cuenca, is located 36 feet above sea level, and occupies an area of approximately 580 square miles (1,500 km2). The city itself is surrounded by the Papaloapan River, and lies a few kilometers south of the Cerro de Oro Dam on its tributary the Santo Domingo River. The municipality is bordered by the state of Veracruz in the north, the municipalities of Loma Bonita to the east and San José Chiltepec to the south. It is almost 100 miles (160 km) to the port of Veracruz, 130 miles (210 km) to Oaxaca City, the state capital, and 310 miles (500 km) to Mexico City.

Tlatlaya Place in Mexico State, Mexico

Tlatlaya is a small town and municipality located in the southeast of the State of Mexico in Mexico. The word “Tlatlaya” means when the hearth is black and red.

Luvianos Town & Municipality in State of Mexico, Mexico

Luvianos is a small town and municipality located in the southwest of the State of Mexico. It gained municipal status in 2000. People can access Luvianos by driving Federal Road 134 south from Toluca, and then take a detour about 25 minutes north of Tejupilco. The name is derived from a hacienda what was established during colonial times.

Altamira, Dominican Republic Place in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Altamira is a town in the Puerto Plata Province of the Dominican Republic.

San Luis Acatlán (municipality) Municipality in Guerrero, Mexico

San Luis Acatlán is one of the 81 municipalities of Guerrero, in south-western Mexico. The municipal seat lies at San Luis Acatlán. The municipality covers an area of 704.4 km².

Pastillo River river in the United States of America

Río Pastillo is a river in the municipality of Ponce, Puerto Rico. It is also known as Río Marueño in the area of the municipality where it runs through barrio Marueño. Together with Cañas River, Pastillo forms Matilde River. Pastillo is one of the 14 rivers in the municipality. The river originates at an altitude of 435 feet. Its tributaries are Quebrada Limon and Quebrada del Agua brooks and the river runs for 19 kilometers before feeding into Río Matilde at a height of 15 feet in Barrio Canas Urbano.

Junín Department, San Luis Department in San Luis, Argentina

Junín is a Department of San Luis Province, Argentina.

Arzobispo River

The Juan Amarillo, Arzobispo, or Salitre River is a river on the Bogotá savanna and a left tributary of the Bogotá River in Colombia. The river originates from various quebradas in the Eastern Hills and flows into the Bogotá River at the largest of the wetlands of Bogotá, Tibabuyes, also called Juan Amarillo Wetland. The total surface area of the Juan Amarillo basin, covering the localities Usaquén, Chapinero, Santa Fe, Suba, Barrios Unidos, Teusaquillo, and Engativá, is 12,892 hectares. Together with the Fucha and Tunjuelo Rivers, the Juan Amarillo River forms part of the left tributaries of the Bogotá River in the Colombian capital.

References