Middle Haddam Historic District

Last updated
Middle Haddam Historic District
RalphSmithHouseMiddleHaddamCT.jpg
The Ralph Smith House
USA Connecticut location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
LocationMoodus and Long Hill Rds., East Hampton, Connecticut
Coordinates 41°33′11″N72°33′6″W / 41.55306°N 72.55167°W / 41.55306; -72.55167 Coordinates: 41°33′11″N72°33′6″W / 41.55306°N 72.55167°W / 41.55306; -72.55167
Area110 acres (45 ha)
Built1730
Architectural styleMid 19th Century Revival, Federal, Colonial
NRHP reference # 84001112 [1]
Added to NRHPFebruary 3, 1984

The Middle Haddam Historic District is a historic district in the town of East Hampton, Connecticut. It encompasses the village center of Middle Haddam, a riverfront community founded in the 17th century on the east bank of the Connecticut River. It was an important port on the river between about 1730 and 1880. Its layout and architecture are reflective of this history, and by the geographic constraints of the local terrain. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. [1]

East Hampton, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

East Hampton is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 12,959 at the 2010 census. The town center village is listed as a census-designated place (CDP). East Hampton includes the villages of Cobalt, Middle Haddam, and Lake Pocotopaug.

Connecticut River River in the New England region of the United States

The Connecticut River is the longest river in the New England region of the United States, flowing roughly southward for 406 miles (653 km) through four states. It rises at the U.S. border with Quebec, Canada, and discharges at Long Island Sound. Its watershed encompasses five U.S. states and one Canadian province, 11,260 square miles (29,200 km2) via 148 tributaries, 38 of which are major rivers. It produces 70% of Long Island Sound's fresh water, discharging at 19,600 cubic feet (560 m3) per second.

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

Contents

Description and history

Middle Haddam was settled in the 17th century as part of Middletown, Connecticut, and was incorporated as part of East Hampton in 1767. From an early date it was a shipbuilding community, with a sawmill on Mill Brook, which runs through the village. By the early 18th century, a ferry service was operating across the Connecticut River. By the time of the American Revolutionary War, it was a significant but small commercial center for a large agricultural area to the east, and became the locus of a road network serving those areas. It also acted as a shipment point for trade with the West Indies and the North American coast, and was the site of shipyards building ocean-going vessels. [2]

Middletown, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Middletown is a city located in Middlesex County, Connecticut, along the Connecticut River, in the central part of the state, 16 miles south of Hartford. In 1650, it was incorporated as a town under its original Native American name, Mattabeseck. It received its present name in 1653. Middletown was included within Hartford County upon its creation on May 10, 1666. In 1784, the central settlement was incorporated as a city distinct from the town. Both were included within newly formed Middlesex County in May 1785. In 1923, the City of Middletown was consolidated with the Town, making the city limits extensive.

American Revolutionary War War between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, which won independence as the United States of America

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was an 18th-century war between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence in 1776 as the United States of America, and then formed a military alliance with France in 1778.

The village and historic district are shaped by the local topography. The river forms the boundary to the west, and the inland boundaries are generally the result of steep slopes along the river bank or of the streams that pass through the area. The village's northern boundary is distinguished by a transition to later industrial development of Cobalt village, and to the south by a wooded open space and a more widely spaced development pattern. The district has 58 historically significant primary buildings, most of which were built before 1835, giving the village a distinctly Federal style. Its oldest buildings date to 1732. There is only one example of Queen Anne Victorian architecture, built as a summer residence near the town landing. [2]

Among others, the Princeton University and Yale Divinity School-educated Second Great Awakening evangelist James Brainerd Taylor (18011829) was born in Middle Haddam's historic district. As a boy, Taylor attended the town's still-standing Christ Episcopal Church (est. 1786).

Princeton University University in Princeton, New Jersey

Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, and renamed itself Princeton University in 1896.

Yale Divinity School

The School of Divinity at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, is one of twelve graduate or professional schools within Yale University.

Second Great Awakening Protestant religious revival in the early 19th-century United States

The Second Great Awakening was a Protestant religious revival during the early 19th century in the United States. The movement began around 1790, gained momentum by 1800 and, after 1820, membership rose rapidly among Baptist and Methodist congregations whose preachers led the movement. It was past its peak by the late 1840s. The Second Great Awakening reflected Romanticism characterized by enthusiasm, emotion, and an appeal to the supernatural. It rejected the skeptical rationalism and deism of the Enlightenment.


See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Middlesex County, Connecticut Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Middlesex County, Connecticut.

Related Research Articles

Haddam, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Haddam is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 7,157 at the 2000 census. The town was also home to the now decommissioned Connecticut Yankee nuclear reactor.

Gales Ferry, Connecticut United States historic place

Gales Ferry is a village in the town of Ledyard, Connecticut, United States. It is located along the eastern bank of the Thames River. The village developed as a result of having a ferry to Uncasville located at this site, and from which the village was named. Gales Ferry was listed as a census-designated place for the 2010 Census, with a population of 1,162.

Aspetuck is a village, which in Connecticut is an unincorporated community on the Aspetuck River, in Fairfield County, Connecticut, mostly in the town of Easton but extending also into Weston. It is significant for being the location of the Aspectuck Historic District, a well-preserved collection of houses from the 18th and 19th centuries. The area was settled in the 17th century. It was a long-time home of Helen Keller. According to a New York Times real estate section article, "The district gets its name from the Aspetuck Indians, who lived along the river. In 1670, they sold the land to English settlers for cloth, winter wheat and maize valued at $.36." Weston was incorporated in 1787, and Easton was split out and incorporated in 1845.

Noank Historic District United States historic place

The Noank Historic District is a historic district encompassing the historic main part of the village of Noank in the town of Groton, Connecticut. The district contains a distinctive assortment of mid-to-late 19th-century residential architecture that is notable for its often picturesque woodwork. At the time of their construction, the village was primarily a worker village for nearby shipyards. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Clinton Village Historic District (Clinton, Connecticut) United States historic place

The Clinton Village Historic District encompasses the historic portion of the town center of Clinton, Connecticut. It is roughly linear and extends along East Main Street from the Indian River in the west to Old Post Road in the east. The area represents a well-preserved mid-19th century town center, with architecture dating from the late 17th to mid-20th centuries. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994.

Little Haddam Historic District United States historic place

The Little Haddam Historic District is a historic district encompassing a rural village center at Orchard and Town Roads in the town of East Haddam, Connecticut. The area was settled early in the town's colonial history and served as its town center into the 19th century. It retains some of its oldest surviving buildings, dating to the 18th and early 19th centuries. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.

Glenville Historic District United States historic place

Glenville Historic District, also known as Sherwood's Bridge, is a 33.9 acres (13.7 ha) historic district in the Glenville neighborhood of the town of Greenwich, Connecticut. It is the "most comprehensive example of a New England mill village within the Town of Greenwich". It "is also historically significant as one of the town's major staging areas of immigrants, predominantly Irish in the 19th century and Polish in the 20th century" and remains "the primary settlement of Poles in the town". Further, "[t]he district is architecturally significant because it contains two elaborate examples of mill construction, designed in the Romanesque Revival and a transitional Stick-style/Queen Anne; an excellent example of a Georgian Revival school; and notable examples of domestic and commercial architecture, including a Queen Anne mansion and an Italianate store building."

Hadley Center Historic District United States historic place

The Hadley Center Historic District is an expansive, 2,500-acre (1,000 ha) historic district encompassing the village center of Hadley, Massachusetts. When it was first listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, the district encompassed the town green and 17 buildings that faced it, at the junction of Russell Street and Middle Street. The district was expanded significantly in 1994, adding more than 400 buildings representative of the village's growth from colonial days into the first decades of the 20th century. This expansion encompasses the entirety of a tongue of land extending west from East Street and bounded by a bend in the Connecticut River, which separates Hadley from Northampton. Its oldest property, the Samuel Porter House on West Street, was built in 1713.

Greeneville, Connecticut United States historic place

Greeneville is a neighborhood of the city of Norwich, Connecticut, located northeast of downtown Norwich along the west bank of the Shetucket River. Most of the neighborhood is designated Greeneville Historic District, a historic district that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Granby Center Historic District United States historic place

The Granby Center Historic District is a predominantly residential historic district encompassing a portion of the village of Granby Center in Granby, Connecticut. The village developed in the 18th century as a farming center, and a now includes a variety of architectural styles from the late 18th to early 20th centuries. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in 1985.

Belltown Historic District United States historic place

The Belltown Historic District encompasses the historic commercial and industrial main village of East Hampton, Connecticut. Settled in the 18th century, the community flourished in the 19th century as a center of bell making, with numerous firms engaged in the trade. The town center is reflective of this 19th-century success, with a broad diversity of period architecture, as well as surviving elements of the bellmaking industry. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

East Haddam Historic District United States historic place

The East Haddam Historic District is a 110-acre (45 ha) historic district in East Haddam, Connecticut representing the historical development of two 18th-century settlements of the town on the east bank of the Connecticut River, Upper Landing and Lower Landing. The district is linear and runs along Route 149. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983, and includes a diversity of 18th and 19th-century styles, as well as the town's main civic structures, and the Goodspeed Opera House. Also included in the district are two monuments, one to Nathan Hale and another to Gen. Joseph Spencer, a park, and a cemetery.

Haddam Center Historic District United States historic place

The Haddam Center Historic District is a 267-acre (108 ha) historic district encompassing the institutional and residential center of the town of Haddam, Connecticut that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1989 as a result of efforts by the Haddam Historical Society.

Hadlyme North Historic District United States historic place

The Hadlyme North Historic District is an 81-acre (33 ha) historic district located in the southwest corner of the town of East Haddam, Connecticut. It represents the historic core of the village of Hadlyme, which straddles the town line, and consists primarily of two north-south roads, Town Street. The village arose around a church society founded in 1743, and grew with the development of small industries along area waterways. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Wickham Road Historic District United States historic place

The Wickham Road Historic District encompasses a well-preserved 18th-century rural streetscape in East Haddam, Connecticut. Included in the district are three houses built c.1735, c.1738, and c.1760, their outbuildings, remnants of another 18th-century house, and remnants of a period sawmill. The area is significant as a visual reminder of what the region might have looked like prior to the advent of industrialization in the 19th century. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.

Grafton Village Historic District United States historic place

The Grafton Village Historic District encompasses the historic village center of the town of Grafton, Vermont. The village was developed in the early-to-mid 19th century, and has retained the character of that period better than many small communities in the state. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2010.

South Londonderry Village Historic District United States historic place

The South Londonderry Village Historic District encompasses a significant portion of the historic developed area of the village of South Londonderry, Vermont. The village has a well-preserved mid-19th century core, with most of its major development history taking place between about 1806 and 1860. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

New Milford Center Historic District United States historic place

The New Milford Center Historic District encompasses much of the traditional civic and commercial heart of New Milford, Connecticut.

Broad Street Green Historic District United States historic place

The Broad Street Green Historic District encompasses the historic late-19th century town center of Windsor, Connecticut. It is centered around the Broad Street Green, a public park extending on the east side of Broad Street between Union and Batchelder Streets, and includes a diversity of architecture spanning much of the town's long history. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2009-03-13.
  2. 1 2 "NRHP nomination for Middle Haddam Historic District". National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-11-26.