Mississippi's 5th congressional district

Last updated

Mississippi's 5th congressional district existed from 1855 to 2003. The state was granted a fifth representative by Congress following the 1850 census.

Contents

From 1853 to 1855, the fifth representative was elected at-large instead of by district, favoring majority voters. The district was abolished by the state legislature following the 2000 census, when the state lost a seat.

Boundaries

Although the boundaries of the fifth congressional district were altered after every census, it covered the Gulf Coast region and most of the Pine Belt region in southeastern Mississippi from 1993 to 2003.

It included all of Forrest, George, Greene, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Lamar, Pearl River, Perry, and Stone counties as well as a portion of Wayne County.

After it was abolished, most of the fifth district was absorbed by the state's fourth congressional district.

2000 election

The district's last election took place on November 7, 2000. Incumbent Gene Taylor, who had represented the district since 1989, easily won re-election.

United States House election, 2000: Mississippi District 5
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Democratic Gene Taylor 153,26478.84
Republican Randall "Randy" McDonnell35,30918.16
Libertarian Wayne Parker3,0021.54
Reform Katie Perrone2,8201.45
Turnout 194,395
Majority117,95560.68

List of members representing the district

MemberPartyYearsCong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1855
Hon. John A. Quitman, Miss - NARA - 528341.jpg
John A. Quitman
Democratic March 4, 1855 –
July 17, 1858
34th
35th
[ data unknown/missing ]
Died.
VacantJuly 17, 1858 –
December 7, 1858
35th
John J. McRae portrait..jpg
John Jones McRae
Democratic December 7, 1858 –
January 12, 1861
35th
36th
Elected to finish Quitman's term.
Withdrew.
VacantJanuary 12, 1861 –
February 23, 1870
36th
37th
38th
39th
40th
41st
Civil War and Reconstruction
LegrandWPerce.jpg
Legrand Winfield Perce
Republican February 23, 1870 –
March 3, 1873
41st
42nd
Elected in 1869 to finish the term and to the next term.
[ data unknown/missing ]
GeorgeCMcKee.jpg
George Colin McKee
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd Redistricted from the 4th district .
[ data unknown/missing ]
CharlesEHooker.jpg
Charles E. Hooker
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1883
44th
45th
46th
47th
[ data unknown/missing ]
Othosingleton.jpg
Otho Robards Singleton
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
48th
49th
Redistricted from the 4th district .
[ data unknown/missing ]
Chapman L. Anderson Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1891
50th
51st
[ data unknown/missing ]
Joseph Henry Beeman Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd [ data unknown/missing ]
John Sharp Williams 1923.jpg
John Sharp Williams
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1903
53rd
54th
55th
56th
57th
[ data unknown/missing ]
Redistricted to the 8th district .
Adam M. Byrd Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1911
58th
59th
60th
61st
[ data unknown/missing ]
Samuel Andrew Witherspoon (ca 1913).jpg
Samuel Andrew Witherspoon
Democratic March 4, 1911 –
November 24, 1915
62nd
63rd
64th
[ data unknown/missing ]
Died.
VacantNovember 24, 1915 –
January 4, 1916
64th
WilliamWVenable.jpg
William Webb Venable
Democratic January 4, 1916 –
March 3, 1921
64th
65th
66th
Elected to finish Witherspoon's term.
[ data unknown/missing ]
RossACollins.jpg
Ross A. Collins
Democratic March 4, 1921 –
January 3, 1935
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
[ data unknown/missing ]
Aubert C. Dunn.jpg
Aubert C. Dunn
Democratic January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1937
74th [ data unknown/missing ]
RossACollins.jpg
Ross A. Collins
Democratic January 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1943
75th
76th
77th
[ data unknown/missing ]
W. Arthur Winstead.jpg
W. Arthur Winstead
Democratic January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1963
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
[ data unknown/missing ]
Redistricted to the 4th district .
William M. Colmer.jpg
William M. Colmer
Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1973
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
Redistricted from the 6th district .
[ data unknown/missing ]
Trent Lott 98th Congress.png
Trent Lott
Republican January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1989
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
[ data unknown/missing ]
Larkin I. Smith.jpg
Larkin I. Smith
Republican January 3, 1989 –
August 13, 1989
101st [ data unknown/missing ]
Died.
VacantAugust 13, 1989 –
October 17, 1989
TaylorGene.jpg
Gene Taylor
Democratic October 17, 1989 –
January 3, 2003
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
Elected to finish Smith's term.
Redistricted to the 4th district .
District eliminated January 3, 2003

Related Research Articles

The 23rd congressional district of Ohio was eliminated in the redistricting following the 1980 census. The district had been created after the elimination of the at-large seat after the 1950 election.

Texass 6th congressional district

Texas District 6 of the United States House of Representatives is a Congressional district that serves Ellis and Navarro counties to the south and southeast of the Dallas/Fort Worth area plus the southeast corner of Tarrant County. As of the 2000 census, District 6 represents 651,620 people. The current Representative from District 6 is Ron Wright, who took office in 2019. The district was represented by Joe Barton from 1985 until 2019. In November 2017, Barton announced that he would retire from Congress and would not seek re-election in 2018.

New Yorks 24th congressional district U.S. House District in Central New York State

The 24th Congressional District of New York includes all of Cayuga, Onondaga, and Wayne counties, and the western part of Oswego County. Its largest city is Syracuse.

Floridas 14th congressional district American political district

Florida's 14th congressional district is an electoral district for the U.S. Congress and was reassigned in 2012, effective January 2013, to western Hillsborough County, Florida and Manatee County. After the district boundaries were changed in 2016, it is located entirely inside of Hillsborough County. The district includes most of Tampa. The district also includes MacDill Air Force Base and Tampa International Airport.

Marylands 7th congressional district

Maryland's 7th congressional district of the United States House of Representatives encompasses just over half of Baltimore City, some sections of Baltimore County, and the majority of Howard County. The district was created following the census of 1950, which gave Maryland one additional representative in the House. It has been drawn as a majority-African American district since 1973. The seat is currently vacant, following the death of incumbent Democratic Representative Elijah Cummings in October 2019.

Ohios 16th congressional district American political district

The 16th congressional district of Ohio is represented by Representative Anthony Gonzalez (R). It also includes some rural communities east of Akron, as well as some of the western suburbs of Cleveland.

The 31st Congressional District of New York was a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in New York. It was eliminated as a result of the 2000 Census. It was last represented by Amo Houghton who was redistricted into the 29th District.

Mississippis 1st congressional district U.S. House District in Northeast Mississippi

Mississippi's 1st congressional district is in the northeast corner of the state. It includes much of the northern portion of the state including Columbus, Oxford, Southaven, and Tupelo. One of the state's major universities, the University of Mississippi, is located within the district at Oxford.

Michigan's at-large congressional district may refer to a few different occasions when a statewide at-large district was used for elections to the United States House of Representatives from Michigan.

Mississippis 3rd congressional district

Mississippi's 3rd congressional district (MS-3) covers central portions of state and stretches from the Louisiana border in the west to the Alabama border in the east.

Michigans 16th congressional district

Michigan's 16th congressional district is an obsolete United States congressional district in Michigan. It covered the communities of Dearborn, Downriver and Monroe County.

Mississippi's 8th congressional district existed from 1903 to 1933. It was created after the 1900 census and abolished following the 1930 census.

Mississippi's 7th congressional district existed from 1883 to 1953. It was created after the 1880 census and abolished following the 1950 census.

Mississippi's 6th congressional district existed from 1873 to 1963. It was created after the United States 1870 census and abolished following the 1960 census, due to changes in population.

From its admittance as a state in 1890 to 1913 Idaho was represented in the United States House of Representatives by one at-large representative. After the 1910 census Idaho was awarded a second seat starting with the 63rd Congress in 1913. However both seats continued to be elected at-large on a general ticket until the election of 1918. Since that year the state has allocated two districts for its representatives.

The U.S. state of Mississippi's at-large congressional district existed from December 10, 1817, when it was admitted to the Union until 1847, when representatives were elected in districts.

Pennsylvania's twenty-first congressional district was a congressional district in northwestern Pennsylvania. It was created following the 1830 Census and was disbanded after the 2000 Census removed two representatives from Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania's twentieth congressional district was a congressional district in southwestern Pennsylvania. It was created following the 1830 Census and was disbanded after the 2000 Census removed two representatives from Pennsylvania. The 18th district is generally considered to be its successor, although the 12th district contains some of its territory.

Iowa's 7th congressional district is a former congressional district in Iowa. It was eliminated after the 1970 election, leaving Iowa with six congressional districts. The state has since been reduced to four congressional districts.

Oklahoma's 6th congressional district is a former congressional district in western Oklahoma. Oklahoma gained 3 seats in the 1910 census, but elected the extra seats at-large in 1912. The 6th district was thus created and first used for the 1914 House election. Oklahoma has gradually lost seats since the 1910 census, and lost its 6th seat in the 2000 census. Since 2003, most of the territory that was in the final configuration of the 6th District has been in the 3rd district.

References