Power number

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For Newton number, see also Kissing number in the sphere packing problem.

The power numberNp (also known as Newton number) is a commonly used dimensionless number relating the resistance force to the inertia force.

The power-number has different specifications according to the field of application. E.g., for stirrers the power number is defined as: [1]

with

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References

  1. Seinfeld, John H (1991). Wei, J; Anderson, J L; Bischoff, K B (eds.). Advances in Chemical Engineering. Academic Press. p. 44. ISBN   978-0-08-056564-4.