Whitesboro, New York

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Whitesboro, New York
Whitesboro, New York Commercial Buildings.jpg
Commercial buildings on Main Street in Whitesboro
Whitesboro, New York new city seal (adopted in 2017).png
Seal
Oneida County New York incorporated and unincorporated areas Whitesboro highlighted.svg
Location in Oneida County and the state of New York.
Coordinates: 43°7′N75°18′W / 43.117°N 75.300°W / 43.117; -75.300 Coordinates: 43°7′N75°18′W / 43.117°N 75.300°W / 43.117; -75.300
Country United States
State New York
County Oneida
Founded by Hugh White (New York)
Area
  Total1.1 sq mi (2.8 km2)
  Land1.1 sq mi (2.8 km2)
  Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation
423 ft (129 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total3,772
  Estimate 
(2018) [1]
3,632
  Density3,400/sq mi (1,300/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
13492
Area code(s) 315
FIPS code 36-81710 [2]
GNIS feature ID0971160 [3]

Whitesboro is a village in Oneida County, New York, United States. The population was 3,772 at the 2010 census. The village was named after Hugh White, an early settler who had been adopted into the Oneida tribe and built the first permanent settlement there in 1784-85. [4]

Village Small clustered human settlement smaller than a town

A village is a clustered human settlement or community, larger than a hamlet but smaller than a town, with a population ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand. Though villages are often located in rural areas, the term urban village is also applied to certain urban neighborhoods. Villages are normally permanent, with fixed dwellings; however, transient villages can occur. Further, the dwellings of a village are fairly close to one another, not scattered broadly over the landscape, as a dispersed settlement.

Oneida County, New York County in New York

Oneida County is a county located in the state of New York, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 234,878. The county seat is Utica. The name is in honor of the Oneida, one of the Five Nations of the Iroquois League or Haudenosaunee, which had long occupied this territory at the time of European encounter and colonization. The federally recognized Oneida Indian Nation has had a reservation in the region since the late 18th century, after the American Revolutionary War.

New York (state) American state

New York is a state located in the Northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.54 million residents in 2018, it is the fourth most populous state. In order to distinguish the state from its city with the same name, it is sometimes referred to as New York State (NYS).

Contents

The Village of Whitesboro is inside the Town of Whitestown.

Whitestown, New York Town in New York, United States

Whitestown is a town in Oneida County, New York, USA. The population was 18,667 at the 2010 census. The name is derived from Judge Hugh White, an early settler.

History

The village began to be settled in 1784, and was incorporated in 1813. An 1851 list gave the name Che-ga-quat-ka for Whitesboro in a language of the Iroquois people. [5]

Iroquois Northeast Native American confederacy

The Iroquois or Haudenosaunee are a historically powerful northeast Native American confederacy in North America. They were known during the colonial years to the French as the Iroquois League, and later as the Iroquois Confederacy, and to the English as the Five Nations, comprising the Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, and Seneca. After 1722, they accepted the Tuscarora people from the Southeast into their confederacy, as they were also Iroquoian-speaking, and became known as the Six Nations.

The abolitionist Oneida Institute was located in Whitesboro from 1827 to 1843.

Oneida Institute

The Oneida Institute was a short-lived (1827–1843) but highly influential school that was a national leader in the emerging abolitionism movement. It was the most radical school in the country, the first at which black men were just as welcome as whites. "Oneida was the seed of Lane Theological Seminary, Western Reserve College, Oberlin and Knox colleges."

Perspective map of Whitesboro from 1891 with list of landmarks Whitesboro, N.Y. LOC 2003630341.tif
Perspective map of Whitesboro from 1891 with list of landmarks

The older part of the village was bordered by the Erie Canal and the village's Main Street. When the canal was filled in the first half of the 20th century, Oriskany Boulevard was built over the filled-in canal. The streets that connect the two roads form the oldest part of the village.[ citation needed ]

Erie Canal Waterway in New York, USA

The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from the Hudson River in Albany to Lake Erie in Buffalo. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly enhanced the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.

New York State Route 69 highway in New York

New York State Route 69 (NY 69) is a state highway extending for 57.42 miles (92.41 km) across the central portion of the U.S. state of New York. The western terminus of the route is at NY 104 in the Oswego County village of Mexico. The eastern terminus is at NY 5A in the Oneida County village of Yorkville, just west of Utica. In between, NY 69 serves the city of Rome.

The Whitestown Town Hall was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. [6]

Whitestown Town Hall United States historic place

Whitestown Town Hall, also known as Liberty Hall, is a historic town hall building located at Whitesboro in Oneida County, New York. It was built in 1807 and is a two-story brick structure situated on the village green. It features 4 two-story pilasters which are terminated at the top by a simple wood cornice.

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

City seal controversy

The Village's former seal was at the center of controversy Whitesboro New York (city seal).jpeg
The Village's former seal was at the center of controversy

The Whitesboro seal, originating in the early 1900s, displays founder Hugh White wrestling an Oneida Native American. [7] The seal has been controversial because it has been interpreted as a settler choking the Native American; city officials contend it depicts a friendly wrestling match that White won, gaining the respect of the Oneida. [8] The current version of the seal was created in 1970, after a lawsuit by a Native American group: the version used before the suit showed the settler's hands on the Native American's neck instead of his shoulders. [9]

The seal attracted more controversy in 2016 when village residents voted 157 to 55 to keep the seal as-is rather than explore alternative images. [8] On January 21, 2016, Patrick O'Connor, the mayor of Whitesboro, called Jessica Williams, a correspondent for The Daily Show , and told her that the town would change the seal. [10]

An updated seal was adopted in the summer of 2017. [11] The new seal was created by Marina Richmond, a student at the PrattMWP College of Art and Design in Utica. [12] While the new seal depicts the same scene as the previous seal it has been changed so that it no longer depicts the Native American as being strangled. [13] Additionally, inaccuracies like the design of the headdress worn by the Oneida chief have been corrected as well as the attire of Hugh White. The skin tone of the Oneida chief has also been whitened. [14]

Geography

Whitesboro is located at 43°7′N75°18′W / 43.117°N 75.300°W / 43.117; -75.300 (43.124, -75.296). [15]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.1 square miles (2.8 km2), all land. [16] The Sauquoit Creek runs through the village.[ citation needed ]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1870 964
1880 1,37042.1%
1890 1,66321.4%
1900 1,95817.7%
1910 2,37521.3%
1920 3,03827.9%
1930 3,37511.1%
1940 3,5324.7%
1950 3,90210.5%
1960 4,78422.6%
1970 4,8050.4%
1980 4,460−7.2%
1990 4,195−5.9%
2000 3,943−6.0%
2010 3,772−4.3%
Est. 20183,632 [1] −3.7%
U.S. Decennial Census [17]

As of the census [2] of 2000, there were 3,943 people, 1,778 households, and 992 families residing in the village. The population density was 3,675.4 people per square mile (1,422.8/km²). There were 1,921 housing units at an average density of 1,790.6 per square mile (693.2/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 97.69% White, 0.53% African American, 0.03% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 0.53% from other races, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.47% of the population.

There were 1,778 households out of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.9% were married couples living together, 15.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.2% were non-families. 39.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.7% had someone living alone who were 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the village, the population was spread out with 23.3% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 31.7% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 86.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.2 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $31,947, and the median income for a family was $42,741. Males had a median income of $29,408 versus $25,865 for females. The per capita income for the village was $17,386.

Notable people

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References

  1. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. Transactions of the Oneida Historical Society at Utica, 1881–1884, p.73 et seq. (1885)
  5. Jones, Pomroy (1851). Annals and recollections of Oneida County. Rome, New York: Published by the author. p. 872.
  6. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  7. Katz, Brigit. "New York Village Changes Controversial Seal Showing a White Settler Wrestling a Native American". Smithsonian.com. Smithsonian Magazine. Retrieved 29 September 2017.
  8. 1 2 Santora, Marc (January 12, 2016). "Residents in Whitesboro, N.Y., vote to keep a much-criticized village emblem". The New York Times .
  9. Potts, Courtney (January 4, 2009). "Whitesboro seal 'takes a little explaining'". Observer-Dispatch .
  10. "Wrestling with History in Whitesboro, NY". The Daily Show . 21 January 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  11. "Whitesboro officially replaces controversial seal". September 25, 2017.
  12. Koren, Cindiana. “Solving Racism – Whitesboro – UPDATE.” http://meetinghouse.co/solving-racism-whitesboro-ny-update/ Accessed 30 Sept. 2017.
  13. Maya Salam (27 September 2017). "New York Village's Seal, Widely Criticized as Racist, Has Been Changed". The New York Times. Retrieved 29 September 2017 via www.nytimes.com.
  14. http://www.uticaod.com/news/20170926/after-past-uproar-whitesboro-has-new-village-seal
  15. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  16. Bureau, US Census. "Search Results". www.census.gov. Retrieved 2017-09-29.
  17. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.