1999 FIFA Women's World Cup

Last updated

FIFA Women's World Cup USA '99
1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.gif
Tournament details
Host countryUnited States
Dates19 June – 10 July
Teams16 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)8 (in 8 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of the United States.svg  United States (2nd title)
Runners-upFlag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Third placeFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Fourth placeFlag of Norway.svg  Norway
Tournament statistics
Matches played32
Goals scored123 (3.84 per match)
Attendance1,194,215 (37,319 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Brazil.svg Sissi
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Sun Wen
(7 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Sun Wen
1995
2003

The 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup, the third edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by the host team. [1] [2] The final between the U.S. and China, held on 10 July at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, was the most-attended women's sports event in history with an official attendance of 90,185. [3] U.S. President Bill Clinton was among those in attendance. The final was scoreless after extra time and won by the U.S. in a penalty shootout. [4] [5] This remains the only Women's World Cup tournament in which the host nation has won.

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

United States womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States Women's National Soccer Team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning three Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic women's gold medals, eight CONCACAF Gold Cups, and ten Algarve Cups. It medaled in every single World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF.

China womens national football team womens national association football team representing the Peoples Republic of China

The Chinese women's national football team, recognized as China PR by FIFA, is governed by the Chinese Football Association. The team is colloquially referred to as "Zhōngguó Nǚzú".

Contents

An official music video of the number Let's Get Loud by Jennifer Lopez was filmed live at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.

A music video is a short film that integrates a song with imagery, and is produced for promotional or artistic purposes. Modern music videos are primarily made and used as a marketing device intended to promote the sale of music recordings. There are also cases where songs are used in tie-in marketing campaigns that allow them to become more than just a song. Tie-ins and merchandising can be used for toys or for food or other products. Although the origins of the music video date back to musical short films that first appeared in the 1920s, they again came into prominence in the 1980s when the channel MTV based their format around the medium. Prior to the 1980s, these kinds of videos were described by various terms including "illustrated song", "filmed insert", "promotional (promo) film", "promotional clip", "promotional video", "song video", "song clip" or "film clip".

Lets Get Loud song by Jennifer Lopez

"Let's Get Loud" is a song recorded by American singer Jennifer Lopez for her debut studio album On the 6 (1999). Originally written by the song's co-writer Gloria Estefan for herself, she felt as if the song was too similar to her previous material and passed it onto Lopez. Estefan, who co-wrote the song alongside Kike Santander, stated that Lopez would have "more fun with it" and would put "a new spin" on it. "Let's Get Loud" is sometimes regarded as Lopez's signature song. Estefan eventually released her own version of the song in 2011 as a bonus track on the deluxe Target edition of her album Miss Little Havana.

Jennifer Lopez American singer and actress

Jennifer Lynn Lopez is an American singer, actress, dancer and producer. In 1991, Lopez began appearing as a Fly Girl dancer on In Living Color, where she remained a regular until she decided to pursue an acting career in 1993. For her first leading role in the 1997 Selena biopic of the same name, Lopez received a Golden Globe nomination and became the first Latin actress to earn over US$1 million for a film. She went on to star in Anaconda (1997) and Out of Sight (1998), later establishing herself as the highest-paid Latin actress in Hollywood.

Host selection

On 31 May 1996, the FIFA Executive Committee awarded as the tournament to the United States. [6] They became the second country to host both men's and women's World Cup, having hosted the men's less than two years before the selection.

FIFA World Cup association football competition for mens national teams

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

1994 FIFA World Cup 1994 edition of the FIFA World Cup

The 1994 FIFA World Cup was the 15th FIFA World Cup, held in nine cities across the United States from 17 June to 17 July 1994. The United States was chosen as the host by FIFA on 4 July 1988. Despite the host nation's lack of soccer tradition, the tournament was the most financially successful in World Cup history; aided by the high-capacity stadiums in the United States, it broke the World Cup average attendance record with more than 69,000 spectators per game, a mark that still stands. The total attendance of nearly 3.6 million for the final tournament remains the highest in World Cup history, despite the expansion of the competition from 24 to 32 teams, which was first introduced at the 1998 World Cup and is the current format.

Venues

Rose Bowl, panorama.jpg FedExredskins.jpg Giants Stadium aerial crop.jpg StanfordStadium2004.jpg
Rose Bowl

Location: Pasadena (Los Angeles), California
Capacity: 90,185

Jack Kent Cooke Stadium

Location: Landover, Maryland (Washington, D.C.)
Capacity: 80,116

Giants Stadium

Location: East Rutherford, New Jersey (New York City)
Capacity: 78,972

Stanford Stadium

Location: Stanford (San Francisco), California
Capacity: 73,123

1999 FIFA Women's World Cup (the United States)
Soldier Field Chicago aerial view crop.jpg Foxborostade crop.png SPStaSJ.jpg PGEParkpano.jpg
Soldier Field

Location: Chicago
Capacity: 65,080

Foxboro Stadium

Location: Foxborough (Boston), Massachusetts
Capacity: 54,456

Spartan Stadium

Location: San Jose, California
Capacity: 31,218

Civic Stadium

Location: Portland, Oregon
Capacity: 20,129

Teams

16 teams participated in the final tournament. The teams were:

Confederation of African Football governing body of association football in Africa

The Confederation of African Football or CAF is the administrative and controlling body for African association football.

Nigeria womens national football team womens national association football team representing Nigeria

The Nigeria national women's football team, nicknamed the Super Falcons, is the national team of Nigeria and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation. They won the first seven African championships and through their first twenty years lost only five games to African competition: December 12, 2002 to Ghana in Warri, June 3, 2007 at Algeria, August 12, 2007 to Ghana in an Olympic qualifier, November 25, 2008 at Equatorial Guinea in the semis of the 2008 Women's African Football Championship and May 2011 at Ghana in an All Africa Games qualification match.

Ghana womens national football team womens national association football team representing Ghana

The Ghana women's national football team is the national team of Ghana and is controlled by the Ghana Football Association. They are nicknamed the Black Queens.

  • Europe (UEFA)
  • North America, Central America & Caribbean (CONCACAF)
    Canada womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Canada

    The Canada women's national soccer team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

    Mexico womens national football team womens national association football team representing Mexico

    The Mexico women's national football team is governed by La Federación Mexicana de Fútbol.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

Denmark womens national football team womens national association football team representing Denmark

The Denmark women's national football team represents Denmark in international women's football. The team is controlled by the Danish Football Association (DBU).

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

Squads

For a list of all squads that played in the final tournament, see 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup squads.

Match officials

Draw

The group draw took place at the Spartan Stadium in San Jose, California on 14 February 1999. [7] [8]

Group stage

Group A

Qualifying countries FIFA Womens World Cup 1999.png
Qualifying countries
PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States (H)3300131+129
2Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 320158−36
3Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 310246−23
4Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 300318−70

(H): Host.

Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg0–3Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report Hamm Soccerball shade.svg 17'
Foudy Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Lilly Soccerball shade.svg 89'
Giants Stadium, East Rutherford
Attendance: 78,972
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)
North Korea  Flag of North Korea.svg1–2Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Jo Soccerball shade.svg 74' Report Akide Soccerball shade.svg 50'
Nwadike Soccerball shade.svg 79'
Rose Bowl, Pasadena
Attendance: 17,100
Referee: Katriina Elovirta (Finland)
United States  Flag of the United States.svg7–1Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Chiejine Soccerball shade.svg 19' (o.g.)
Hamm Soccerball shade.svg 20'
Milbrett Soccerball shade.svg 23', 83'
Lilly Soccerball shade.svg 32'
Akers Soccerball shade.svg 39'
Parlow Soccerball shade.svg 42'
Report Okosieme Soccerball shade.svg 2'
Soldier Field, Chicago
Attendance: 65,080
Referee: Nicole Petignat (Switzerland)
North Korea  Flag of North Korea.svg3–1Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Jin Soccerball shade.svg 15'
Jo Soccerball shade.svg 39'
Kim Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Report Johansen Soccerball shade.svg 74'
Civic Stadium, Portland
Attendance: 20,129
Referee: Martha Toro (Colombia)
Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg2–0Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Akide Soccerball shade.svg 25'
Okosieme Soccerball shade.svg 81'
Report
United States  Flag of the United States.svg3–0Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea
MacMillan Soccerball shade.svg 56'
Venturini Soccerball shade.svg 68', 76'
Report
Foxboro Stadium, Foxborough
Attendance: 50,484
Referee: Katriina Elovirta (Finland)

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 3210124+87
2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3120104+65
3Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 31113304
4Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 3003115−140
Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg7–1Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Pretinha Soccerball shade.svg 3', 12', 90+1'
Sissi Soccerball shade.svg 29', 42', 50'
Kátia Soccerball shade.svg 35' (pen.)
Report Domínguez Soccerball shade.svg 10'
Italy  Flag of Italy.svg1–1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Panico Soccerball shade.svg 36' Report Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 61' (pen.)
Rose Bowl, Pasadena
Attendance: 17,100
Referee: Bola Elizabeth Abidoye (Nigeria)
Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg2–0Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Sissi Soccerball shade.svg 3', 63' Report
Soldier Field, Chicago
Attendance: 65,080
Referee: Gitte Nielsen (Denmark)
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg6–0Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Grings Soccerball shade.svg 10', 57', 90+2'
Smisek Soccerball shade.svg 46'
Hingst Soccerball shade.svg 49'
Lingor Soccerball shade.svg 89'
Report
Civic Stadium, Portland
Attendance: 20,129
Referee: Im Eun Ju (Korea Republic)
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg3–3Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Prinz Soccerball shade.svg 8'
Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 46' (pen.)
Jones Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Report [ permanent dead link ] Kátia Soccerball shade.svg 15'
Sissi Soccerball shade.svg 20'
Maycon Soccerball shade.svg 90+4'
Mexico  Flag of Mexico.svg0–2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Report Panico Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Zanni Soccerball shade.svg 51'

Group C

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3300132+119
2Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 3201103+76
3Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3012312−91
4Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 3012110−91
Japan  Flag of Japan.svg1–1Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Otake Soccerball shade.svg 64' Report Burtini Soccerball shade.svg 32'
Spartan Stadium, San Jose
Attendance: 23,298
Referee: Maria Edilene Siqueira (Brazil)
Russia  Flag of Russia.svg1–2Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Komarova Soccerball shade.svg 78' Report Sandaune Soccerball shade.svg 28'
Pettersen Soccerball shade.svg 68'
Foxboro Stadium, Foxborough
Attendance: 14,873
Referee: Xiudi Zuo (China)
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg7–1Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 8', 36'
Lehn Soccerball shade.svg 49'
Riise Soccerball shade.svg 54'
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 68'
Pettersen Soccerball shade.svg 76'
Gulbrandsen Soccerball shade.svg 87'
Report Hooper Soccerball shade.svg 31'
Japan  Flag of Japan.svg0–5Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Report Savina Soccerball shade.svg 29'
Letyushova Soccerball shade.svg 52', 90'
N. Karasseva Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Barbashina Soccerball shade.svg 80'
Civic Stadium, Portland
Attendance: 17,668
Referee: Sandra Hunt (United States)
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg1–4Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Hooper Soccerball shade.svg 76' Report Grigorieva Soccerball shade.svg 54'
Fomina Soccerball shade.svg 66', 86'
O. Karasseva Soccerball shade.svg 90+1'
Giants Stadium, East Rutherford
Attendance: 29,401
Referee: Xiudi Zuo (China)
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg4–0Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Riise Soccerball shade.svg 8' (pen.)
Isozaki Soccerball shade.svg 26' (o.g.)
Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 36'
Mellgren Soccerball shade.svg 61'
Report

Group D

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 3300122+109
2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 320163+36
3Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 301237−41
4Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 3012110−91
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg1–2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Bengtsson Soccerball shade.svg 2' Report Jin Y. Soccerball shade.svg 17'
Liu A.L. Soccerball shade.svg 69'
Spartan Stadium, San Jose
Attendance: 23,298
Referee: Virginia Tovar (Mexico)
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg1–1Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana
Murray Soccerball shade.svg 74' Report Gyamfua Soccerball shade.svg 76'
Foxboro Stadium, Foxborough
Attendance: 14,867
Referee: Kari Seitz (United States)
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg1–3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Murray Soccerball shade.svg 32' Report Törnqvist Soccerball shade.svg 8'
Ljungberg Soccerball shade.svg 21', 69'
Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, Landover
Attendance: 16,448
Referee: Fatou Gaye (Senegal)
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg7–0Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana
Sun W. Soccerball shade.svg 9', 21', 54'
Jin Y. Soccerball shade.svg 16'
Zhang O.Y. Soccerball shade.svg 82', 90+1'
Zhao L.H. Soccerball shade.svg 90+2'
Report
Civic Stadium, Portland
Attendance: 17,668
Referee: Elke Günthner (Germany)
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg3–1Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Sun W. Soccerball shade.svg 39', 51'
Liu Y. Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Report Salisbury Soccerball shade.svg 66'
Ghana  Flag of Ghana.svg0–2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Report Svensson Soccerball shade.svg 58', 86'
Soldier Field, Chicago
Attendance: 34,256
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Knockout stage

Bracket

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
1 July – Landover
 
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3
 
4 July – Stanford
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 2
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2
 
1 July – Landover
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil (a.e.t.) 4
 
10 July – Pasadena
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 3
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States (pen.) 0 (5)
 
30 June – San Jose
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0 (4)
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3
 
4 July – Foxboro
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 0
 
30 June – San Jose
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 5Third place
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 2
 
10 July – Pasadena
 
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 0
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil (pen.) 0 (5)
 
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 0 (4)
 

Quarter-finals

China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg2–0Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Pu W. Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Jin Y. Soccerball shade.svg 56'
Report
Spartan Stadium, San Jose
Attendance: 21,411
Referee: Nicole Petignat (Switzerland)

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg3–1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 51'
Pettersen Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Riise Soccerball shade.svg 72' (pen.)
Report Moström Soccerball shade.svg 90'
Spartan Stadium, San Jose
Attendance: 21,411
Referee: Im Eun-ju (Korea Republic)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg3–2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Milbrett Soccerball shade.svg 16'
Chastain Soccerball shade.svg 49'
Fawcett Soccerball shade.svg 66'
Report Chastain Soccerball shade.svg 5' (o.g.)
Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 45+1'
Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, Landover
Attendance: 54,642
Referee: Martha Toro (Colombia)

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg4–3 (a.e.t.)Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Cidinha Soccerball shade.svg 4', 22'
Nenê Soccerball shade.svg 35'
Sissi Soccerball shade gold.svg 104'
Report [ permanent dead link ] Emeafu Soccerball shade.svg 63'
Okosieme Soccerball shade.svg 72'
Egbe Soccerball shade.svg 85'
Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, Landover
Attendance: 54,642
Referee: Virginia Tovar (Mexico)

Semi-finals

United States  Flag of the United States.svg2–0Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Parlow Soccerball shade.svg 5'
Akers Soccerball shade.svg 80' (pen.)
Report [ permanent dead link ]
Stanford Stadium, Stanford
Attendance: 73,123
Referee: Katriina Elovirta (Finland)

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg0–5Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Report Sun W. Soccerball shade.svg 3', 72'
Liu A.L. Soccerball shade.svg 14', 51'
Fan Y.J. Soccerball shade.svg 65'
Foxboro Stadium, Foxborough
Attendance: 8,986
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Third place play-off

A No extra time was played. [9]

Final

Awards

The following awards were given for the tournament: [10]

Golden BallSilver BallBronze Ball
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Sun Wen Flag of Brazil.svg Sissi Flag of the United States.svg Michelle Akers
Golden ShoeSilver ShoeBronze Shoe
Flag of Brazil.svg Sissi Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Sun Wen Flag of Norway.svg Ann Kristin Aarønes
7 goals7 goals4 goals
FIFA Fair Play Award
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR

All-Star Team

GoalkeepersDefendersMidfieldersForwards

Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Gao Hong
Flag of the United States.svg Briana Scurry

Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Wang Liping
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Wen Lirong
Flag of Germany.svg Doris Fitschen
Flag of the United States.svg Brandi Chastain
Flag of the United States.svg Carla Overbeck

Flag of Brazil.svg Sissi
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Liu Ailing
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Zhao Lihong
Flag of Germany.svg Bettina Wiegmann
Flag of the United States.svg Michelle Akers

Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Jin Yan
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Sun Wen
Flag of Norway.svg Ann Kristin Aarønes
Flag of the United States.svg Mia Hamm

Goal scorers

Sissi of Brazil and Sun Wen of China won the Golden Shoe award for scoring seven goals. In total, 123 goals were scored by 74 different players, with three of them credited as own goals. [11]

7 goals
4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goals

Tournament ranking

RankTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6510183+1516
2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 6510192+1716
3Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 6321169+711
4Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 6411168+813
Eliminated in the quarter-finals
5Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 4202105+56
6Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 420276+16
7Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 4202812–46
8Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 4121127+55
Eliminated at the group stage
9Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 31113304
10Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 310246–23
11Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 301237–41
12Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3012312–91
13Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 3012110–91
13Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 3012110–91
15Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 300318–70
16Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 3003115–140

Table source[ citation needed ]

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Group C of the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was one of four groups of nations, consisting of Argentina, Canada, Germany and Japan. It began on 20 September and its last matches were played on 27 September. Most matches were played at the Columbus Crew Stadium in Columbus. Germany won every match, while Argentina failed to win a match. Despite beating Argentina 6–0, Japan failed to advance, while a young Canada team surprisingly made the second round.

Group D of the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was one of four groups of nations, consisting of Australia, China, Ghana and Russia. It began on 21 September and ended on 28 September. Most matches were played at The Home Depot Center in Carson, save the last two that were played at PGE Park in Portland. China PR topped the group despite their lackluster performances, followed to the next round by Russia. Australia and Ghana didn't make the second round.

The knockout stage of the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was the second and final stage of the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup in the United States. It began on 1 October 2003 and ended with the final at the Home Depot Center, Carson, California on 12 October 2003. Germany, China, Norway, Brazil, Canada, Russia, Sweden, and defending champions United States. Canada, Germany, Sweden and the United States made it to the semi-finals. Sweden beat Canada 2–1 to reach the final, while Germany overcame the host country 3–0. The United States beat its neighbors for third place, and Germany beat Sweden 2–1 in the final in extra time.

The Australia women's national association football team has represented Australia at the FIFA Women's World Cup on six occasions in 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011 and 2015 and have qualified for the 2019 tournament. The team also participated in the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament, a precursor to the Women's World Cup.

This article contains the results of the Republic of Ireland women's national football team between 1990 and 1999. During the 1990s the Republic of Ireland competed in four UEFA Women's Championship qualification campaigns – 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2001. After losing 10–0 to Sweden in a Euro 1993 qualifier, the FAI did not enter a team in the 1995 competition. This defeat against Sweden remains the team's biggest defeat. They also competed in qualifiers for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup. On 4 September 1999 they also played an away friendly against the United States.

United States at the CONCACAF Gold Cup

The United States men's national soccer team has participated in all 14 editions of the CONCACAF Gold Cup since its foundation at 1991 to replace the CONCACAF Championship. The U.S. is also the second-most successful team in the tournament, having won six titles since the beginning of the Gold Cup, behind Mexico by just one title. Before the Gold Cup however, the U.S. only qualified for two of the previous ten CONCACAF Championships.

Katriina Elovirta Finnish association football player and referee

Katriina Elovirta was a Finnish female footballer and was a well known international match referee who served from 1991-2003. She served as a referee affiliating with FIFA between 1995 to 2003 She also worked as a development manager for the Finnish Football Association until her death. Elovirta died at age 57 after a long illness.

References

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  10. Awards 1999
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